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-   -   not sure where to ask this question, about the audio production possibilities... (http://www.linux-archive.org/ubuntu-studio-user/348571-not-sure-where-ask-question-about-audio-production-possibilities.html)

Viktor Mastoridis 03-29-2010 01:05 PM

not sure where to ask this question, about the audio production possibilities...
 
Hi Gabriel,

I am not sure from your email what is the level of your knowledge, so I will presume you know almost nothing (pardon me if I am wrong)

Here's the way I use UbuntuStudio, and I guess everyone is using it in a different way



1. Jack (audio server) is at the heart of an audio system - it lets you route all audio and midi signals:
- hardware audio inputs (guitar, mics) to software (Ardour,)
- software outputs (Ardour, Muse) to hardware outputs (stereo out > amp > speakers)


- software outputs (Ardour, Muse)* to other software inputs (Effects etc)
- midi inputs (keyboard midi out) to software inputs (Muse)
- other midi signals routing: keyboard (Muse midi out to external synth or hardware stereo out or Ardour for audio recording of the midi signal)



Please note that some programs let you edit the Jack connections via their own interface, some even insist on that (Ardour).
-----------------------------
The second main use of Jack is that it serves as a Master Transport control - i.e. all 'jack-aware' apps start and stop the playback when one of them is started/stopped. Of course, you will need to check that jack-transport is enabled on most of them for this to work.



Audio/Midi recording. There are all kinds of possibilities here. I personally use

2. Hydrogen - for drums. Comes with a few drums kits, lets you download more within the program itself. Excellent, intuitive drum-machine



3. Muse - for midi: it has a built-in soft* synth, but I use it mainly for soundfonts (sf2). Soundfonts (or soundfont banks) are basically good and and not so good copies/emulations of real instruments (you might want to google here for MIDI standard, General Midi specifications, sf2 fonts etc)



4. Zynaddsubfx for generated synth sounds; it possesses many banks of ready sounds, and other users of this list have contributed with patches for its libraries.

5. Ardour for audio recording (mics, guitars etc), and fx (reverb, chorus etc)



6. Jamin - once I have all these 4 apps playing parts (drums, midi, audio) of my music, run them all through Jamin,* trying to create a nice master track. The jamin output I usually record back in Ardour on a stereo track, and then right-click > export it on my computer.



here's a good Ubuntu Studio link to get you into the things in a more technical/detailed way.
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UbuntuStudio



I hope this helps.

Viktor Mastoridis
www.meditera.co.uk

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Brian David 03-29-2010 02:52 PM

not sure where to ask this question, about the audio production possibilities...
 
On Sat, Mar 27, 2010 at 8:11 PM, G L Romeu <romeug@comcast.net> wrote:

I have been on the graphics end of computers, everything from photo

through layout to 3d for cad/cam, and therefore my initial interest in

studio.***SNIP*

Does anyone have some programs that i should concentrate on to start

with, and any other advice? *There seems to be so much

available....thanks, gabriel

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G L Romeu

* * * * http://studiofurniture.com

* * * * http://lessplusmore.com

* * * * http://journalphoto.org



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For someone working with audio, you will want to make sure you understand how to start the JACK audio server.* Oddly enough, for software that is the heart of professional audio in Linux, there is surprisingly little documentation on this software.* Here is about as good a guide as there is on using JACK:


http://en.flossmanuals.net/Ardour/StartJackUbuntu

That is a chapter in a manual on using Ardour, which is the other application that you WILL want to know if you really want to get the most out of your Ubuntu Studio install.* The link to the full manual is:


http://en.flossmanuals.net/ardour/
Many people will recommend Audacity, particularly for beginners.* But trust me, if you plan on getting into Ubuntu Studio and Linux audio for the long haul,* Ardour is the program you'll want to use.


Speaking of Ardour, I noticed there's a good change they won't reach their fundraising goals over at Ardour.org this month.* So, as a reminder to all you audio enthusiasts:* If you're on this list and you use Ardour regularly and you're not a subscriber, you should seriously consider supporting the program financially.

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Brian David 03-30-2010 03:47 AM

not sure where to ask this question, about the audio production possibilities...
 
On Mon, Mar 29, 2010 at 6:45 PM, mac <suemac@empire.net> wrote:

Hi from the Ardour web page:



Non-destructive, non-linear editing with unlimited undo



What you describe above is indeed modifying the recording, I don't

believe it is considered "destructive" editing.



Audacity will allow the wave form to be edited on a per sample basis,

actually changing the value of the sample at will. I believe this is

considered "destructive" editing.



I would be happy to be wrong, but I don't think Ardour allows such

detailed editing of the raw data.



Regards,

Mac





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I must admit, Mac, I find myself confused by your statements.* Why would you want destructive editing?* We should make sure our definitions are the same.* By destructive editing, I refer to the act of editing an audio file in a program, and then those changes are immediately applied to the original audio file, therefore making the changes permanent (i.e. cannot be undone). It is common practice to avoid destructive editing like the plague, as you usually want to retain the integrity the original file just in case you'd like to go back and do things differently.* If you want a new file that reflects the changes you have made, then you use the program's 'Export' feature.


Editing on a per sample basis, as you put it, is not necessarily destructive, and it is also something that I believe Ardour can do.* I rarely have need to do such a thing, and as such I cannot be certain if Ardour does that as well as Audacity.

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