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Old 11-09-2009, 12:00 AM
Erik Rasmussen
 
Default Hardware & Software Recommendations?

Looking for Hardware and Software recommendations...
HARDWARE:If you build your own desktop computer and you plan to install Ubuntu Studio to do broadcast audio and video production, what motherboard and audio card do you recommend?

If you are about to purchase a laptop for audio and video production and to use Ubuntu Studio, what laptop do you recommend?
SOFTWARE:On Windows, Sony*Sound Forge and Sony Vegas Pro have worked very well for broadcast audio and video production. *I'm trying to switch to Ubuntu Studio, but I have not found comparable and capable native Linux tools to achieve the tasks of detailed audio editing, multi-track audio & video editing and production. *What Linux native software do you recommend for broadcast quality audio and video production?


Brief list of some software features desired:Can open, edit and save as FLAC audio files (without having to manually convert first).

Multi-track editing*capabilities.Very detailed graphical representation of waveform.Fast to open and to save files.Visual feedback of audio levels or graphical representation of waveform while recording and playback.

Able to gracefully handle and mix with audio files of varying sample and bit rates.
Thanks!
-Erik*


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Old 11-09-2009, 01:32 AM
Christopher Stamper
 
Default Hardware & Software Recommendations?

On Sun, Nov 8, 2009 at 8:00 PM, Erik Rasmussen <MailForErik@gmail.com> wrote:


Brief list of some software features desired:Can open, edit and save as FLAC audio files (without having to manually convert first).

Multi-track editing*capabilities.Very detailed graphical representation of waveform.Fast to open and to save files.Visual feedback of audio levels or graphical representation of waveform while recording and playback.



Able to gracefully handle and mix with audio files of varying sample and bit rates
Ardour is definately what you want. It may not be able to handle FLAC, but it's does everything else and more.



See ardour.org

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Old 11-09-2009, 09:10 AM
john
 
Default Hardware & Software Recommendations?

I strongly recommend you work with both ardour and audacity, they're
great tools with different capabilities.

I would say by your list of features, you are looking for an editing
program more than a DAW. Ardour is the best option for multitrack
recording and mixing, but when it comes to editing, you're much better
working with audacity.

Audacity has great features and support for file converting and handling
different sample rates. In fact, something really handy is its batch
converting capabilities which can really speed up your work!
It also comes with spectrum as well as other forms of analizers.

It also has a cool feature of being able to work with files of DIFFERENT
sample rates in a session. I don't recommend doing this, but it's
practical when wanting to load files quickly without having to convert
everything before working.

good luck!

john


On Mon, 2009-11-09 at 02:32 +0000,
ubuntu-studio-users-request@lists.ubuntu.com wrote:
> Message: 10
> Date: Sun, 8 Nov 2009 21:32:32 -0500
> From: Christopher Stamper <christopherstamper@gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: Hardware & Software Recommendations?
> To: Ubuntu Studio Users Help and Discussion
> <ubuntu-studio-users@lists.ubuntu.com>
> Message-ID:
> <f8ce4b8a0911081832k7437a42dna7012b494960248b@mail .gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> On Sun, Nov 8, 2009 at 8:00 PM, Erik Rasmussen
> <MailForErik@gmail.com>wrote:
>
> > Brief list of *some *software features desired:
> >
> > 1. Can open, edit and save as FLAC audio files (without having to
> > manually convert first).
> > 2. Multi-track editing capabilities.
> > 3. Very detailed graphical representation of waveform.
> > 4. Fast to open and to save files.
> > 5. Visual feedback of audio levels or graphical representation of
> > waveform while recording and playback.
> > 6. Able to gracefully handle and mix with audio files of varying
> sample
> > and bit rates
> >
> >
> Ardour is definately what you want. It may not be able to handle FLAC,
> but
> it's does everything else and more.
>
> See ardour.org


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Old 11-09-2009, 01:01 PM
Pietro Bergamo
 
Default Hardware & Software Recommendations?

On Sun, 2009-11-08 at 19:00 -0600, Erik Rasmussen wrote:





Brief list of some software features desired:



Can open, edit and save as FLAC audio files (without having to manually convert first).


Audacity


Multi-track editing capabilities.


Audacity or Ardour


Very detailed graphical representation of waveform.


Audacity or Ardour


Fast to open and to save files.


Audacity


Visual feedback of audio levels or graphical representation of waveform while recording and playback.


Ardour


Able to gracefully handle and mix with audio files of varying sample and bit rates.


Audacity



Cheers,

Pietro


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Old 11-09-2009, 01:20 PM
Hartmut Noack
 
Default Hardware & Software Recommendations?

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

Erik Rasmussen schrieb:
> Looking for Hardware and Software recommendations...
>
> *HARDWARE:*
>
> 1. If you build your own desktop computer and you plan to install Ubuntu
> Studio to do broadcast audio and video production, what *motherboard *

Any recent mid-price motherboard will do. If you buy a new one from the
shelf the older the better....

> and
> *audio **card *do you recommend?

Depending on budget:

lowest: MAudio Audiophile (around Euro/USD 80,-) no other reasonable
card on the market works the same as smoothly.

more: MAudio Delta (the same as the Audiophile yet with more analogue
channels)

pro: RME Hammerfall DSP - unbeatable yet with around 500+ on ebay not
quite cheap.



> 2. If you are about to purchase a *laptop *for audio and video production
> and to use Ubuntu Studio, what laptop do you recommend?

> *What Linux native software do you recommend
> for broadcast quality audio and video production?*

Every software on Linux produces sound at the maximum quality level that
can be handled by the hardware.
There is no artificial limitation in terms of quality in free software
for Linux.


>
> Brief list of *some *software features desired:
>
> 1. Can open, edit and save as FLAC audio files (without having to
> manually convert first).
> 2. Multi-track editing capabilities.
> 3. Very detailed graphical representation of waveform.
> 4. Fast to open and to save files.
> 5. Visual feedback of audio levels or graphical representation of
> waveform while recording and playback.
> 6. Able to gracefully handle and mix with audio files of varying sample
> and bit rates.
>

I also recommend Ardour but you have to accept, that you need to open
("import") every file you want to use in Ardour. There is no
"rightklick/open with ardour" option in any filemanager. Ardour itself
knows only one fileformat, all external files you want to use are
converted with the import.
Thus Ardour can offer maximum performance/comfort and soundquality. And
ask whoever you want in the pro-audioscene: nobody will name a single
reason to actually work with compressed fileformats.

Regarding movies: Ardour can be synched with the videoplayer xjadeo to
make it work for post-production. To cut/arrange movies in the first
place I recommend openmovieeditor - it is available for ubuntu studio
and works reliable and fast while it has everything one would use dayly
when working with final cut

best regs

HZN
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Old 11-09-2009, 01:24 PM
Daniel Joshua Worth
 
Default Hardware & Software Recommendations?

On Mon, Nov 9, 2009 at 7:20 AM, Hartmut Noack <zettberlin@linuxuse.de> wrote:

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

Hash: SHA1



Erik Rasmussen schrieb:

> Looking for Hardware and Software recommendations...

>

> *HARDWARE:*

>

> * *1. If you build your own desktop computer and you plan to install Ubuntu

> * *Studio to do broadcast audio and video production, what *motherboard *



Any recent mid-price motherboard will do. If you buy a new one from the

shelf the older the better....



> and

> * **audio **card *do you recommend?



Depending on budget:



lowest: MAudio Audiophile (around Euro/USD 80,-) no other reasonable

card on the market works the same as smoothly.



more: MAudio Delta (the same as the Audiophile yet with more analogue

channels)



pro: RME Hammerfall DSP - unbeatable yet with around 500+ on ebay not

quite cheap.







> * *2. If you are about to purchase a *laptop *for audio and video production

> * *and to use Ubuntu Studio, what laptop do you recommend?



> *What Linux native software do you recommend

> for broadcast quality audio and video production?*



Every software on Linux produces sound at the maximum quality level that

can be handled by the hardware.

There is no artificial limitation in terms of quality in free software

for Linux.





>

> Brief list of *some *software features desired:

>

> * *1. Can open, edit and save as FLAC audio files (without having to

> * *manually convert first).

> * *2. Multi-track editing capabilities.

> * *3. Very detailed graphical representation of waveform.

> * *4. Fast to open and to save files.

> * *5. Visual feedback of audio levels or graphical representation of

> * *waveform while recording and playback.

> * *6. Able to gracefully handle and mix with audio files of varying sample

> * *and bit rates.

>



I also recommend Ardour but you have to accept, that you need to open

("import") every file you want to use in Ardour. There is no

"rightklick/open with ardour" option in any filemanager. Ardour itself

knows only one fileformat, all external files you want to use are

converted with the import.

Thus Ardour can offer maximum performance/comfort and soundquality. And

ask whoever you want in the pro-audioscene: nobody will name a single

reason to actually work with compressed fileformats.



Regarding movies: Ardour can be synched with the videoplayer xjadeo to

make it work for post-production. To cut/arrange movies in the first

place I recommend openmovieeditor - it is available for ubuntu studio

and works reliable and fast while it has everything one would use dayly

when working with final cut



best regs



HZN

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----

Version: GnuPG v1.4.9 (GNU/Linux)

Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org



iEYEARECAAYFAkr4JUoACgkQ1Aecwva1SWNfTwCeNCv7xnKl2t 7eXNmQIRRg4NUs

p8sAoIXBYu8NMLsCIrBMxRzvRFCeYwCz

=nous

-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----



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The latest version of Ardour (2.8.3) supports import and export of Flac files.

Dan

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Old 11-09-2009, 05:55 PM
Erik Rasmussen
 
Default Hardware & Software Recommendations?

Thanks so much for all the responses! *Any thoughts on these comments?
Need to work with full quality compressed files:

Ardour seemed like the program I should learn to use, but I was rather put off by the lack of FLAC support and requirement to manually convert all files to WAVE using some other software. *It also seemed like I randomly had trouble getting Ardour to capture or playback audio. *Any tips?


In producing a 30 minute radio broadcast program, I work with numerous audio files that are normally in excess of 1 hour in length. *Full CD quality Wave files of this length consume a lot of hard drive space and with the volume of files that I need to record, capture and edit, it is simply not real practical to work in Wave files. *FLAC serves very well in that you get full quality without the space consumption of Wave files. *


Sony Sound Forge and Sony Vegas Pro do something they call "proxy compressed files". *So when you go to open a compressed file their software de-compresses it automatically, (without requiring the user to do so manually), and allows you to work with the file, and then when you save the software it will save back to the compressed format and automatically delete the "proxy file" when you close the application. *It would be nice if Ardour could do something like that.*


I see that Daniel Worth said Ardour 2.8.3 can import and export FLAC files. *Is that the version of Ardour that comes with Ubuntu Studio 9.10?
AUDACITY:I want to like Audacity, but it seems very slow for me to save and a little cumbersome to navigate. *As stated above, I'm generally working with large files and perhaps that's what slows down Audacity? *When I started digital audio production I had to sacrifice lots of wait time while the software did it's saving. *I hate to have to go back to long wait times again.


Does anyone know of any tricks to make Audacity save large files faster, or are there any other alternative audio editing and mixing software programs anyone would recommend?

I really appreciate the advice and tips from you all. *This is my last important task which I need to migrate to Linux before I can dump my last Windows PC and run only on Linux.

Thanks!
-Erik*



On Mon, Nov 9, 2009 at 08:20, Hartmut Noack <zettberlin@linuxuse.de> wrote:


-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

Hash: SHA1



Erik Rasmussen schrieb:

> Looking for Hardware and Software recommendations...

>

> *HARDWARE:*

>

> * *1. If you build your own desktop computer and you plan to install Ubuntu

> * *Studio to do broadcast audio and video production, what *motherboard *



Any recent mid-price motherboard will do. If you buy a new one from the

shelf the older the better....



> and

> * **audio **card *do you recommend?



Depending on budget:



lowest: MAudio Audiophile (around Euro/USD 80,-) no other reasonable

card on the market works the same as smoothly.



more: MAudio Delta (the same as the Audiophile yet with more analogue

channels)



pro: RME Hammerfall DSP - unbeatable yet with around 500+ on ebay not

quite cheap.







> * *2. If you are about to purchase a *laptop *for audio and video production

> * *and to use Ubuntu Studio, what laptop do you recommend?



> *What Linux native software do you recommend

> for broadcast quality audio and video production?*



Every software on Linux produces sound at the maximum quality level that

can be handled by the hardware.

There is no artificial limitation in terms of quality in free software

for Linux.





>

> Brief list of *some *software features desired:

>

> * *1. Can open, edit and save as FLAC audio files (without having to

> * *manually convert first).

> * *2. Multi-track editing capabilities.

> * *3. Very detailed graphical representation of waveform.

> * *4. Fast to open and to save files.

> * *5. Visual feedback of audio levels or graphical representation of

> * *waveform while recording and playback.

> * *6. Able to gracefully handle and mix with audio files of varying sample

> * *and bit rates.

>



I also recommend Ardour but you have to accept, that you need to open

("import") every file you want to use in Ardour. There is no

"rightklick/open with ardour" option in any filemanager. Ardour itself

knows only one fileformat, all external files you want to use are

converted with the import.

Thus Ardour can offer maximum performance/comfort and soundquality. And

ask whoever you want in the pro-audioscene: nobody will name a single

reason to actually work with compressed fileformats.



Regarding movies: Ardour can be synched with the videoplayer xjadeo to

make it work for post-production. To cut/arrange movies in the first

place I recommend openmovieeditor - it is available for ubuntu studio

and works reliable and fast while it has everything one would use dayly

when working with final cut



best regs



HZN

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Old 11-09-2009, 06:39 PM
Christopher Stamper
 
Default Hardware & Software Recommendations?

On Mon, Nov 9, 2009 at 1:55 PM, Erik Rasmussen <MailForErik@gmail.com> wrote:


Thanks so much for all the responses! *Any thoughts on these comments?
Need to work with full quality compressed files:

Ardour seemed like the program I should learn to use, but I was rather put off by the lack of FLAC support and requirement to manually convert all files to WAVE using some other software. *It also seemed like I randomly had trouble getting Ardour to capture or playback audio. *Any tips?


In producing a 30 minute radio broadcast program, I work with numerous audio files that are normally in excess of 1 hour in length. *Full CD quality Wave files of this length consume a lot of hard drive space and with the volume of files that I need to record, capture and edit, it is simply not real practical to work in Wave files. *FLAC serves very well in that you get full quality without the space consumption of Wave files. *




Sony Sound Forge and Sony Vegas Pro do something they call "proxy compressed files". *So when you go to open a compressed file their software de-compresses it automatically, (without requiring the user to do so manually), and allows you to work with the file, and then when you save the software it will save back to the compressed format and automatically delete the "proxy file" when you close the application. *It would be nice if Ardour could do something like that.*


Are you understanding the typical DAW workflow?

Your project folder contains all the audio for the project, in whatever format the DAW (in this case Ardour) chooses to use. If you import existing audio to the project, such as a FLAC file, the DAW will copy and maybe convert the file automatically. There will now be a new file in the project folder. The file you imported can be deleted without effecting the project.



You can record audio in the project, and files will automatically be created in the background.

All audio in the project is represented as one or more regions. You can move these 'regions' around in the project, and merge or split them. It doesn't matter if they came from an external file, or if it was recorded from within the DAW software.



When you are done, you export the project as a single track in whatever format you choose. This is how almost all 'pro audio' software works, so you might as well just get used to it. It really makes more sense than anything else.



Note that through the entire process, you shouldn't have to worry about the files or file formats. Everything is done automatically. The exception obviously is importing/exporting.

*

I see that Daniel Worth said Ardour 2.8.3 can import and export FLAC files. *Is that the version of Ardour that comes with Ubuntu Studio 9.10?
If not all you have to do is let it update (via update manager/apt).


*

AUDACITY:I want to like Audacity, but it seems very slow for me to save and a little cumbersome to navigate. *As stated above, I'm generally working with large files and perhaps that's what slows down Audacity? *When I started digital audio production I had to sacrifice lots of wait time while the software did it's saving. *I hate to have to go back to long wait times again.




Does anyone know of any tricks to make Audacity save large files faster, or are there any other alternative audio editing and mixing software programs anyone would recommend?


Audacity is *bad*. Really bad.

Well, ok maybe it's not that bad. But I have no idea why you would want to use it for anything but a quick edit operation. Ardour can do everything it can, and more (except maybe mp3 exports ;-). Plus, Ardour is easier to use.



Hope this helps!

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Old 11-10-2009, 01:12 AM
daniel romero calder—n
 
Default Hardware & Software Recommendations?

Erik Rasmussen escribió:
> Thanks so much for all the responses! Â Any thoughts on these comments?
>
> Need to work with full quality compressed files:
> Ardour seemed like the program I should learn to use, but I was rather
> put off by the lack of FLAC support and requirement to manually
> convert all files to WAVE using some other software. Â It also seemed
> like I randomly had trouble getting Ardour to capture or playback
> audio. Â Any tips?

hi, maybe you can try this: http://traverso-daw.org/
they talk about flac support here:
http://traverso-daw.org/resampling-and-compression.html

hope this helps
dani.

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Old 11-10-2009, 05:23 AM
"laurent.bellegarde"
 
Default Hardware & Software Recommendations?

Erik Rasmussen a écrit :
> Looking for Hardware and Software recommendations...
>
> *HARDWARE:*
>
> 1. If you build your own desktop computer and you plan to install
> Ubuntu Studio to do broadcast audio and video production, what
> *motherboard *and *audio **card *do you recommend?
> 2. If you are about to purchase a *laptop *for audio and video
> production and to use Ubuntu Studio, what laptop do you recommend?
>
>
> *SOFTWARE:*
> On Windows, Sony *Sound Forge*
> <http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/soundforge> and Sony *Vegas Pro*
> <http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/vegaspro> have worked very well
> for broadcast audio and video production. I'm trying to switch to
> Ubuntu Studio, but I have not found comparable and capable native
> Linux tools to achieve the tasks of detailed audio editing,
> multi-track audio & video editing and production. *What Linux native
> software do you recommend for broadcast quality audio and video
> production?*

Hi Erik,

for video editing,

beginner : Kino, Open shot editor (like window movie maker/imovie)
intermediate : Open movie editor, kdenlive (like studio pinnacle)
Advanced : Cinelerra (like adobe premiere, final cut)

Laurent
lprod.org



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