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Old 07-16-2008, 06:24 AM
"Paul DeShaw"
 
Default many problems after upgrade to Hardy

On Tue, 15 Jul 2008 , Gustin Johnson wrote:

> Should not have to create a new user. If the new kernel is indeed
> installed you may have to update grub. See below.
>
> update-grub is your friend. For some reason this was not run
> automatically on your machine during the install. Was your install
> interrupted? It doesn't really matter unless you are trying to
> reproduce the problem for a bug report.
>
> Once you have updated grub you should notice a significant improvement.
> ~ When you are booting into the new kernels it is a good idea to remove
> the old ones.

OK, I think I know the problem. After I ran update-grub, the report
showed the new kernels were found and added to the list, but then they
still didn't appear on the grub menu when I rebooted. That's because
this is a multi-boot system, and the MBR is pointed to the last
installation, which I had hand-edited to include the other two
partitions. I had forgotten that I was actually using the grub list
from Musix to boot Ubuntu. I booted Musix, and ran update-grub. This
was a mistake, as update-grub did not look on the other partitions for
kernels, and erased the Ubuntu and 64 Studio kernels from the list.

So for now I can't boot Ubuntu Studio, but the grub list on that
partition should be OK. I am typing this in Musix.

Rather than edit the grub.list in Musix, I think I would rather fix
the MBR to use the grub.list in Ubuntu Studio. Then I can get rid of
Musix and 64 Studio, which I don't use.


>
> |
> | There are a couple of huge long threads on Ubuntu forums on all kinds of
> | things that happened to people's systems when they upgraded to Hardy,
> | which is why I waited so long, hoping bugs would get reported and
> | fixed. I'm glad this one is LTS; I'm going to skip the next release or
> | two so I can have everything working for a while before an upgrade can
> | mess it up again.
>
> Hundreds of installs out of how many thousands (tens, hundreds, or
> more)? Don't be fooled into thinking there is an epidemic on this basis
> alone. Of course you are free (and encouraged) to come to your own
> conclusions. I do not intend to start a flame war over this. Our
> experiences differ and that is about as far as we are going to get.

Apparently, with the right hardware, everything is wonderful. I did
do quite a bit of research before building my system, but not enough,
it seems.

I also have Ubuntu Studio on a first generation Apple MacBook, and in
general it works better than my desktop. The theme looks great on the
MacBook screen. Sad that the system I installed Ubuntu on as an
afterthought works better than the one I built for it.

>
> At any rate I hope that update-grub does the trick. You should not need
> any switches or other command line options though you do need sudo or
> admin privileges.

Well, unfortunately I applied this tool where it would do the most
damage. I think I saw a tutorial on rewriting an MBR at
ubuntuguide.org . If you know one you like better, I'd like to know
about it.

Thanks,

Paul

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Old 07-19-2008, 04:38 PM
"Paul DeShaw"
 
Default many problems after upgrade to Hardy

Gustin Johnson* wrote:

What are the hardware specs of your desktop and what soundcard/midi

controller are you using?
AMD 64 2800+, 1GB, M-Audio Ozone Academic (USB keyboard/MIDI/audio interface, originally bundled with Pro Tools M-Powered Academic bundle.* Kernel support added for this device in the main kernel tree, late 2007,* then integrated into the Hardy kernel)

*
*Do you have any extra boot options in your

menu.lst (eg. noacpi or some such)?
I don't see any.





You mentioned that you had 64Studio installed, does it fare any better

with your hardware? *I have 64Studio on my Desktop and Ubuntu for my

laptop and am familiar (and happy) with both distros.
I have never been able to get 64 Studio to recognize my audio/midi hardware, even though I updated it fairly recently.* I haven't checked to see what kernel they're currently using.



-On Wed, 16 Jul 2008, Cory K. wrote:



I'm going to suggest a clean reinstall of Ubuntu Studio-Hardy on the box

in question *if* you really wanna see if it's the HW or your

configuration. Feisty->Gutsy->Hardy. Many things could have happened

over this time frame.



-Cory K.
I've been leaning towards this, moving files and directories I want to save to external drives in preparation for it.* Three things are hindering this effort:

1).* I still have to learn how to clone my old /home directory into a new installation.* I could leave it in the containing file and just copy it into the new /home, but I would rather have it just become the new* /home.* I'm not sure I'm being clear--


I don't think I want to end up with /home/pad/old_pad, with old_pad being the home folder I saved from the old installation.* (My user name is pad.)* Rather, I want /home/pad to just be the original /home/pad, with the addition of whatever Ubuntu puts in your home folder by default, such as examples and whatnot.* I don't know how to accomplish this other than moving files one at a time into the new /home/pad.* Surely there's an easier and more elegant way?* Also, not sure if I need the entire /home directory, or just my user (pad) directory to come over.


2)* With the availability of the new 64-bit version, I'd rather install that. (Recall that I have an AMD 64-based system).* I'm not sure if some things get stored in the home folder that will not be compatible between 32-bit and 64-bit systems.* There are all kinds of hidden files that I take to be configuration files, and who knows what else.* I don't know if I will break a whole bunch of stuff by attempting to use my old user folder in a new, 64-bit system.


Maybe I should compromise, by moving my /home into its own partition, then installing the 64-bit with its own /home.* I can then mount the other /home partition to access files as needed, keeping the /home within the new installation as the default /home.* The disadvantage is I won't be able to have the default /home on its own partition--or maybe I can? Just have two different /home partitions with different names, and point to one as the default?


This is way more complicated than I'd like.* Much simpler and more elegant to integrate the old into the new.* But I'm now sure about the procedure, and what to do about any files that might mess up a 64-bit system.


3) I've noticed I have all the sound (but not MIDI) funtioning on the 2.6.22-xx kernels, but NOT the 2.6.24-xx kernels. That M-Audio thing is not detected--even though the 2.6.24-xx kernels work fine with it on the MacBook, including the new-to-Hardy MIDI functionality.* On the desktop, with the ~.24 kernels I can't even listen to .mp3s, no system sounds, nothing.* Who knows if I will have no sound at all with a clean reinstall, and if I will be able to fix it if it doesn't work? * So I'm a little stuck right now.


Thanks for working with me, I don't know what I'd do otherwise.

--PD


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Old 07-19-2008, 10:19 PM
"Rafael F. Compte"
 
Default many problems after upgrade to Hardy

2008/7/19 Paul DeShaw <pauldeshaw@gmail.com>:
> 1). I still have to learn how to clone my old /home directory into a new
> installation. I could leave it in the containing file and just copy it into
> the new /home, but I would rather have it just become the new /home. I'm
> not sure I'm being clear--
>
> I don't think I want to end up with /home/pad/old_pad, with old_pad being
> the home folder I saved from the old installation. (My user name is pad.)
> Rather, I want /home/pad to just be the original /home/pad, with the
> addition of whatever Ubuntu puts in your home folder by default, such as
> examples and whatnot. I don't know how to accomplish this other than moving
> files one at a time into the new /home/pad. Surely there's an easier and
> more elegant way? Also, not sure if I need the entire /home directory, or
> just my user (pad) directory to come over.

I could tell you about what I would do. I usually do a clean install
to avoid issues. So I install on top of the version I'm trying to
replace, "but" I keep my home partition intact. I just mount it as
home but I don't format it. I choose a different username and let it
install. Once I have installed all the packages I need I just do in a
terminal from the /home directory something like this
:~$ sudo chown -R newusername: oldusername
(replace with with own and notice the colon and the spaces)
Now you can put your stuff back in your current home folder. Don't
replace every file, especially hidden ones. This is a fast way to back
up your data though.
I hope this was useful to you.
Regards,

--
Rafael F. Compte

Ciudad de Buenos Aires - Argentina
54 (15) 5870 3482 | 54 11 4706 1625

http://www.rafaelfcompte.com.ar

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