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Old 02-13-2012, 03:27 PM
Pandu Poluan
 
Default MySQL's future in Debian and Ubuntu

On Feb 13, 2012 2:21 PM, "Eddie Bachle" <enb10@albion.edu> wrote:

>

> In general, I am generally an simply an observer on most of these mailing lists, however my concerns with a switch are far less technical and far more practical. *I work currently for a college in Michigan which utilizes almost solely Windows servers simply because it is what the IT staff here knows. *As a student here, I was brought in to assist with the web server administration, and as time went by because I have a degree of*Linux*knowledge, I was given permission to put together a Ubuntu LAMP server to serve a couple of interested parties on campus who wanted simply to demo several small scale web apps that were*Linux*exclusive. *This server would serve as an exception to the general rule of our server architecture. *However as time has went by and my knowledge looks more like it will be a fixture here after graduation, along with the simple instability of PHP and Apache on the Windows platform, my boss is giving far more consideration to moving to Linux. *


>

> As Linux gains more public recognition, more and more Windows-only organizations will consider using it as an alternative, especially for their web servers. * This is especially true because of the fact that each of the necessarily main components of a web server exist in Linux in the same form as the do on Windows and often run much better. *Then, the only piece one would need to learn would be the new operating system, not the database, HTTP server, or PHP scripting language software. **However, this is going to be a more difficult proposition if the aforementioned advantage is somewhat*eliminated. *Were I to have to tell my boss that we could switch to Ubuntu but it would mean that would need to use a "MySQL compatible" database if we want to use the native database (which we likely would because it's tested to be stable and it is supported by the developers), then she would be much more hesitant. *


>

> There simply is a much greater sense of trepidation for those who are not significantly Linux savvy if there exists a possibility that they would have to make something work in an unfamiliar environment, especially if it were to happen unexpectedly. *If we ported our www website server over to Ubuntu and then 6 months down the road we were to upgrade our Joomla version and there became an issue with MariaDB because it lacks some MySQL feature that it needs, or even that Joomla would fail to recognize Maria as being equivalent to MySQL at some point, then that would be a huge detraction against switching. *


>

> Unless assurances that any software that asks for MySQL will recognize and accept MariaDB equivalents, and that this should always be the case, and that it will retain the stability and recognized benefits of MySQL, I would encourage extreme caution in encouraging a switch. *Linux is beginning to grow into areas it previously didn't reach and bringing a far superior web server experience as well as simply a better operating system experience for many and I would not like to see that growth compromised. *I would like to say we would still switch, or still heavily consider it for the grains that could be made by using Ubuntu, however realistically, the lack of native MySQL in any OS would be a huge mark against it. *Also that being said, if the technical concerns are answered adequately for a vast majority of applications and hardware/OS setups, then I would be totally behind switching to a more open source friendly and compatible database software as there would be little love lost between me and MySQL. *


>

> I hope this perspective helps a bit in considering this decision, *

>


Do remember that there's an alternative to MySQL/MariaDB: PostgreSQL.


I'm actually busy migrating the Windows infrastructure, and my target database is PostgreSQL.


Note: I am *not* recommending that Ubuntu replaced its default database from MySQL to PostgreSQL; If a company already deployed a MySQL-based app, then it should migrate to MariaDB, if only to prevent being trapped by Oracle into migrating into Oracle. But for those still exploring a migration to Linux, I won't hesitate to push them toward PostgreSQL instead. There are clear benefits of PostgreSQL over MySQL for the enterprise, and vv.



Rgds,



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Old 02-14-2012, 02:41 AM
Diego Xirinachs
 
Default MySQL's future in Debian and Ubuntu

I currently use Mysql but dont have technical knowledge about it, I just use it because the programs I use for web development uses it (like wordpress), so, If I would get the same features and stability while on MariaDB, I would encourage the move.


Most people who are not database-savvy wont even notice if this is done well...myself included

And for those who are database savvy, well you can download and install it from the partner repo that will be available by then.


I also found an interview Linux.com did to the creator of MariaDB, interesting read and bold statements from the dude

https://www.linux.com/news/enterprise/biz-enterprise/544438:special-qaa-with-monty-widenius


cheers

2012/2/13 Pandu Poluan <pandu@poluan.info>




On Feb 13, 2012 2:21 PM, "Eddie Bachle" <enb10@albion.edu> wrote:

>

> In general, I am generally an simply an observer on most of these mailing lists, however my concerns with a switch are far less technical and far more practical. *I work currently for a college in Michigan which utilizes almost solely Windows servers simply because it is what the IT staff here knows. *As a student here, I was brought in to assist with the web server administration, and as time went by because I have a degree of*Linux*knowledge, I was given permission to put together a Ubuntu LAMP server to serve a couple of interested parties on campus who wanted simply to demo several small scale web apps that were*Linux*exclusive. *This server would serve as an exception to the general rule of our server architecture. *However as time has went by and my knowledge looks more like it will be a fixture here after graduation, along with the simple instability of PHP and Apache on the Windows platform, my boss is giving far more consideration to moving to Linux. *



>

> As Linux gains more public recognition, more and more Windows-only organizations will consider using it as an alternative, especially for their web servers. * This is especially true because of the fact that each of the necessarily main components of a web server exist in Linux in the same form as the do on Windows and often run much better. *Then, the only piece one would need to learn would be the new operating system, not the database, HTTP server, or PHP scripting language software. **However, this is going to be a more difficult proposition if the aforementioned advantage is somewhat*eliminated. *Were I to have to tell my boss that we could switch to Ubuntu but it would mean that would need to use a "MySQL compatible" database if we want to use the native database (which we likely would because it's tested to be stable and it is supported by the developers), then she would be much more hesitant. *



>

> There simply is a much greater sense of trepidation for those who are not significantly Linux savvy if there exists a possibility that they would have to make something work in an unfamiliar environment, especially if it were to happen unexpectedly. *If we ported our www website server over to Ubuntu and then 6 months down the road we were to upgrade our Joomla version and there became an issue with MariaDB because it lacks some MySQL feature that it needs, or even that Joomla would fail to recognize Maria as being equivalent to MySQL at some point, then that would be a huge detraction against switching. *



>

> Unless assurances that any software that asks for MySQL will recognize and accept MariaDB equivalents, and that this should always be the case, and that it will retain the stability and recognized benefits of MySQL, I would encourage extreme caution in encouraging a switch. *Linux is beginning to grow into areas it previously didn't reach and bringing a far superior web server experience as well as simply a better operating system experience for many and I would not like to see that growth compromised. *I would like to say we would still switch, or still heavily consider it for the grains that could be made by using Ubuntu, however realistically, the lack of native MySQL in any OS would be a huge mark against it. *Also that being said, if the technical concerns are answered adequately for a vast majority of applications and hardware/OS setups, then I would be totally behind switching to a more open source friendly and compatible database software as there would be little love lost between me and MySQL. *



>

> I hope this perspective helps a bit in considering this decision, *

>


Do remember that there's an alternative to MySQL/MariaDB: PostgreSQL.


I'm actually busy migrating the Windows infrastructure, and my target database is PostgreSQL.


Note: I am *not* recommending that Ubuntu replaced its default database from MySQL to PostgreSQL; If a company already deployed a MySQL-based app, then it should migrate to MariaDB, if only to prevent being trapped by Oracle into migrating into Oracle. But for those still exploring a migration to Linux, I won't hesitate to push them toward PostgreSQL instead. There are clear benefits of PostgreSQL over MySQL for the enterprise, and vv.




Rgds,




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Old 02-14-2012, 11:28 AM
"Fabio T. Leitao"
 
Default MySQL's future in Debian and Ubuntu

For those who have not¬*followed¬*this up closely, a little history.
Remember that MariaDB is not just "compatible" with MySQL, but it kind of IS MySQL, forked and¬*re-branded.


In 2009, even before Oracle has purchased Sun, Monty Widenius (one of the original creators of MySQL and architects) has left the Sun (than the owner of MySQL) and started MariaDB,¬*intended as a replacement for the full MySQL server.


It seems that since that, most of the MySQL developers left and joined either Drizzle or MariaDB. Drizzle is another fork, but was targeted to a ‚Äúlimited but important market‚ÄĚ, created by Brian Aker almost the same time when MySQL was bought by Sun (back in 2008)


Most of the differences would be which patches are applied when, some the overall "what do the developers want the end product to be", and in the case of Ubuntu linux, the actual names of the packages in the repositories (and the¬*eventually¬*cross references in other packages dependencies)



2012/2/14 Diego Xirinachs <dxiri343@gmail.com>


I currently use Mysql but dont have technical knowledge about it, I just use it because the programs I use for web development uses it (like wordpress), so, If I would get the same features and stability while on MariaDB, I would encourage the move.




Most people who are not database-savvy wont even notice if this is done well...myself included

And for those who are database savvy, well you can download and install it from the partner repo that will be available by then.




I also found an interview Linux.com did to the creator of MariaDB, interesting read and bold statements from the dude

https://www.linux.com/news/enterprise/biz-enterprise/544438:special-qaa-with-monty-widenius




cheers

2012/2/13 Pandu Poluan <pandu@poluan.info>






On Feb 13, 2012 2:21 PM, "Eddie Bachle" <enb10@albion.edu> wrote:

>

> In general, I am generally an simply an observer on most of these mailing lists, however my concerns with a switch are far less technical and far more practical. ¬*I work currently for a college in Michigan which utilizes almost solely Windows servers simply because it is what the IT staff here knows. ¬*As a student here, I was brought in to assist with the web server administration, and as time went by because I have a degree of¬*Linux¬*knowledge, I was given permission to put together a Ubuntu LAMP server to serve a couple of interested parties on campus who wanted simply to demo several small scale web apps that were¬*Linux¬*exclusive. ¬*This server would serve as an exception to the general rule of our server architecture. ¬*However as time has went by and my knowledge looks more like it will be a fixture here after graduation, along with the simple instability of PHP and Apache on the Windows platform, my boss is giving far more consideration to moving to Linux. ¬*





>

> As Linux gains more public recognition, more and more Windows-only organizations will consider using it as an alternative, especially for their web servers. ¬* This is especially true because of the fact that each of the necessarily main components of a web server exist in Linux in the same form as the do on Windows and often run much better. ¬*Then, the only piece one would need to learn would be the new operating system, not the database, HTTP server, or PHP scripting language software. ¬*¬*However, this is going to be a more difficult proposition if the aforementioned advantage is somewhat¬*eliminated. ¬*Were I to have to tell my boss that we could switch to Ubuntu but it would mean that would need to use a "MySQL compatible" database if we want to use the native database (which we likely would because it's tested to be stable and it is supported by the developers), then she would be much more hesitant. ¬*





>

> There simply is a much greater sense of trepidation for those who are not significantly Linux savvy if there exists a possibility that they would have to make something work in an unfamiliar environment, especially if it were to happen unexpectedly. ¬*If we ported our www website server over to Ubuntu and then 6 months down the road we were to upgrade our Joomla version and there became an issue with MariaDB because it lacks some MySQL feature that it needs, or even that Joomla would fail to recognize Maria as being equivalent to MySQL at some point, then that would be a huge detraction against switching. ¬*





>

> Unless assurances that any software that asks for MySQL will recognize and accept MariaDB equivalents, and that this should always be the case, and that it will retain the stability and recognized benefits of MySQL, I would encourage extreme caution in encouraging a switch. ¬*Linux is beginning to grow into areas it previously didn't reach and bringing a far superior web server experience as well as simply a better operating system experience for many and I would not like to see that growth compromised. ¬*I would like to say we would still switch, or still heavily consider it for the grains that could be made by using Ubuntu, however realistically, the lack of native MySQL in any OS would be a huge mark against it. ¬*Also that being said, if the technical concerns are answered adequately for a vast majority of applications and hardware/OS setups, then I would be totally behind switching to a more open source friendly and compatible database software as there would be little love lost between me and MySQL. ¬*





>

> I hope this perspective helps a bit in considering this decision, ¬*

>


Do remember that there's an alternative to MySQL/MariaDB: PostgreSQL.


I'm actually busy migrating the Windows infrastructure, and my target database is PostgreSQL.


Note: I am *not* recommending that Ubuntu replaced its default database from MySQL to PostgreSQL; If a company already deployed a MySQL-based app, then it should migrate to MariaDB, if only to prevent being trapped by Oracle into migrating into Oracle. But for those still exploring a migration to Linux, I won't hesitate to push them toward PostgreSQL instead. There are clear benefits of PostgreSQL over MySQL for the enterprise, and vv.






Rgds,




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Old 02-14-2012, 11:36 AM
"Fabio T. Leitao"
 
Default MySQL's future in Debian and Ubuntu

From MariaDB FAQ page:http://kb.askmonty.org/en/why-is-the-project-called-mariadb
"The 'MySQL' name is trademarked by Oracle, and they have chosen to keep that trademark to themselves. The name MySQL (just like the MyISAM storage engine) comes from Monty's first daughter "My". MariaDB continues this tradition by being named after his younger daughter."


If you need to confirm the¬*compatibly and known incompatibilities between them,¬*http://kb.askmonty.org/en/mariadb-versus-mysql-compatibility¬*



2012/2/14 Fabio T. Leitao <fabio.tleitao@gmail.com>


For those who have not¬*followed¬*this up closely, a little history.
Remember that MariaDB is not just "compatible" with MySQL, but it kind of IS MySQL, forked and¬*re-branded.



In 2009, even before Oracle has purchased Sun, Monty Widenius (one of the original creators of MySQL and architects) has left the Sun (than the owner of MySQL) and started MariaDB,¬*intended as a replacement for the full MySQL server.



It seems that since that, most of the MySQL developers left and joined either Drizzle or MariaDB. Drizzle is another fork, but was targeted to a ‚Äúlimited but important market‚ÄĚ, created by Brian Aker almost the same time when MySQL was bought by Sun (back in 2008)



Most of the differences would be which patches are applied when, some the overall "what do the developers want the end product to be", and in the case of Ubuntu linux, the actual names of the packages in the repositories (and the¬*eventually¬*cross references in other packages dependencies)




2012/2/14 Diego Xirinachs <dxiri343@gmail.com>



I currently use Mysql but dont have technical knowledge about it, I just use it because the programs I use for web development uses it (like wordpress), so, If I would get the same features and stability while on MariaDB, I would encourage the move.





Most people who are not database-savvy wont even notice if this is done well...myself included

And for those who are database savvy, well you can download and install it from the partner repo that will be available by then.





I also found an interview Linux.com did to the creator of MariaDB, interesting read and bold statements from the dude

https://www.linux.com/news/enterprise/biz-enterprise/544438:special-qaa-with-monty-widenius





cheers

2012/2/13 Pandu Poluan <pandu@poluan.info>







On Feb 13, 2012 2:21 PM, "Eddie Bachle" <enb10@albion.edu> wrote:

>

> In general, I am generally an simply an observer on most of these mailing lists, however my concerns with a switch are far less technical and far more practical. ¬*I work currently for a college in Michigan which utilizes almost solely Windows servers simply because it is what the IT staff here knows. ¬*As a student here, I was brought in to assist with the web server administration, and as time went by because I have a degree of¬*Linux¬*knowledge, I was given permission to put together a Ubuntu LAMP server to serve a couple of interested parties on campus who wanted simply to demo several small scale web apps that were¬*Linux¬*exclusive. ¬*This server would serve as an exception to the general rule of our server architecture. ¬*However as time has went by and my knowledge looks more like it will be a fixture here after graduation, along with the simple instability of PHP and Apache on the Windows platform, my boss is giving far more consideration to moving to Linux. ¬*






>

> As Linux gains more public recognition, more and more Windows-only organizations will consider using it as an alternative, especially for their web servers. ¬* This is especially true because of the fact that each of the necessarily main components of a web server exist in Linux in the same form as the do on Windows and often run much better. ¬*Then, the only piece one would need to learn would be the new operating system, not the database, HTTP server, or PHP scripting language software. ¬*¬*However, this is going to be a more difficult proposition if the aforementioned advantage is somewhat¬*eliminated. ¬*Were I to have to tell my boss that we could switch to Ubuntu but it would mean that would need to use a "MySQL compatible" database if we want to use the native database (which we likely would because it's tested to be stable and it is supported by the developers), then she would be much more hesitant. ¬*






>

> There simply is a much greater sense of trepidation for those who are not significantly Linux savvy if there exists a possibility that they would have to make something work in an unfamiliar environment, especially if it were to happen unexpectedly. ¬*If we ported our www website server over to Ubuntu and then 6 months down the road we were to upgrade our Joomla version and there became an issue with MariaDB because it lacks some MySQL feature that it needs, or even that Joomla would fail to recognize Maria as being equivalent to MySQL at some point, then that would be a huge detraction against switching. ¬*






>

> Unless assurances that any software that asks for MySQL will recognize and accept MariaDB equivalents, and that this should always be the case, and that it will retain the stability and recognized benefits of MySQL, I would encourage extreme caution in encouraging a switch. ¬*Linux is beginning to grow into areas it previously didn't reach and bringing a far superior web server experience as well as simply a better operating system experience for many and I would not like to see that growth compromised. ¬*I would like to say we would still switch, or still heavily consider it for the grains that could be made by using Ubuntu, however realistically, the lack of native MySQL in any OS would be a huge mark against it. ¬*Also that being said, if the technical concerns are answered adequately for a vast majority of applications and hardware/OS setups, then I would be totally behind switching to a more open source friendly and compatible database software as there would be little love lost between me and MySQL. ¬*






>

> I hope this perspective helps a bit in considering this decision, ¬*

>


Do remember that there's an alternative to MySQL/MariaDB: PostgreSQL.


I'm actually busy migrating the Windows infrastructure, and my target database is PostgreSQL.


Note: I am *not* recommending that Ubuntu replaced its default database from MySQL to PostgreSQL; If a company already deployed a MySQL-based app, then it should migrate to MariaDB, if only to prevent being trapped by Oracle into migrating into Oracle. But for those still exploring a migration to Linux, I won't hesitate to push them toward PostgreSQL instead. There are clear benefits of PostgreSQL over MySQL for the enterprise, and vv.







Rgds,




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Old 02-14-2012, 03:49 PM
Marc Deslauriers
 
Default MySQL's future in Debian and Ubuntu

On Mon, 2012-02-13 at 10:11 -0600, Robbie Williamson wrote:
> On 02/13/2012 01:20 AM, Eddie Bachle wrote:
> > I would like to say we would still switch, or still heavily consider it
> > for the grains that could be made by using Ubuntu, however
> > realistically, the lack of native MySQL in any OS would be a huge mark
> > against it.
>
> FTR, we would not *drop* MySQL support. Worst case scenario, we'd place
> them in partner, much like we did with sun-java. The change would be
> that our default/recommended DB would be MariaDB.
>
> > Also that being said, if the technical concerns are
> > answered adequately for a vast majority of applications and hardware/OS
> > setups, then I would be totally behind switching to a more open source
> > friendly and compatible database software as there would be little love
> > lost between me and MySQL.
>
> One thing to note, the primary motivator for this proposal isn't about
> moving to a more "open source friendly" application. We have genuine
> security concerns/issues with how MySQL handles and publishes their
> security updates. We can't simply update supported prior Ubuntu
> releases to newer MySQL versions, so we have to backport patches. Their
> lack of information and access to the bugs addressed makes it *very*
> time consuming and difficult for our security and SRU teams to do this.
> If we can resolve these issues, then MySQL's future in main looks much
> brighter.

We are unable to determine what the recent MySQL security fixes are due
to lack of details, and unclear commit messages.

The only thing we can do to keep our users secure right now is to push
MySQL 5.5.20 and 5.1.61 to our stable releases, which is less than ideal
for various reasons.

Marc.




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Old 02-15-2012, 10:57 PM
Henrik Ingo
 
Default MySQL's future in Debian and Ubuntu

On Tue, Feb 14, 2012 at 2:28 PM, Fabio T. Leitao
<fabio.tleitao@gmail.com> wrote:
> For those who have not¬*followed¬*this up closely, a little history.
>
> Remember that MariaDB is not just "compatible" with MySQL, but it kind of IS
> MySQL, forked and¬*re-branded.
>
> In 2009, even before Oracle has purchased Sun, Monty Widenius (one of the
> original creators of MySQL and architects) has left the Sun (than the owner
> of MySQL) and started MariaDB,¬*intended as a replacement for the full MySQL
> server.
>
> It seems that since that, most of the MySQL developers left and joined
> either Drizzle or MariaDB. Drizzle is another fork, but was targeted to a
> ‚Äúlimited but important market‚ÄĚ, created by Brian Aker almost the same time
> when MySQL was bought by Sun (back in 2008)
>

Hi Fabio

You contributed a fairly good history, so it inspired me to fill in
missing pieces.

There is also a fourth MySQL fork: Percona Server. It is interesting
to note people in this thread and in general the Linux distro people
seem to omit this when talking about MySQL forks. As far as I'm aware
it is the most popular of the forks (after MySQL itself), and used by
many demanding Percona customers, especially the big and sexy Web
companies (but not only).

Out of these four it should first be mentioned that Drizzle is not at
all a compatible fork of MySQL. Some would say the things that are not
compatible are enhancements :-) But nevertheless, while Drizzle feels
very familiar to a MySQL user, you couldn't take away MySQL, drop in
Drizzle and expect that nobody would notice.

Percona Server is like MariaDB in that both of them are compatible
with MySQL and you could do a plug-and-play replacement. Percona
Server is much closer to MySQL (which many think is great), shall I
say more focused. MariaDB has more deviation in the code base and also
adds more stuff like additional storage engines (which many think is
great, especially when you want to play with new features).

Personally I think the main benefit of Percona Server is that they
have a 5.5 version out there for some time - exactly a year ago it
seems! While MariaDB has focused more on their own work (and perhaps
also therefore the merge effort for them is much larger) they haven't
yet produced a 5.5 release (even alpha). This should be taken into
account, since many MySQL users already use MySQL 5.5 and features
like semi-sync replication, they would consider MariaDB a downgrade.

The difference is not big, but it is commonly accepted that (InnoDB)
performance wise a vanilla MySQL 5.5 is better than Percona Server 5.1
or MariaDB 5.3. Otoh Percona Server 5.5 improves on MySQL 5.5.

The other strong advantage Percona has at the moment is their recent
adoption of Galera clustering technology (see Percona XtraDB Cluster).
This is a revolutionary technology when it comes to High-Availability
with MySQL and even scalability of MySQL. In fact it has many of the
good properties seen in many NoSQL solutions (but is still good old
SQL, Galera is just about the clustering). I'm personally a big fan of
Galera and don't intend to use anything else going forward.

Just wanted to complete the discussion with these perspectives from a
MySQL heavy user.

henrik
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Old 02-16-2012, 01:16 AM
Colin Charles
 
Default MySQL's future in Debian and Ubuntu

Hi!

On 13 Feb 2012, at 15:20, Eddie Bachle wrote:

> As Linux gains more public recognition, more and more Windows-only organizations will consider using it as an alternative, especially for their web servers. This is especially true because of the fact that each of the necessarily main components of a web server exist in Linux in the same form as the do on Windows and often run much better. Then, the only piece one would need to learn would be the new operating system, not the database, HTTP server, or PHP scripting language software. However, this is going to be a more difficult proposition if the aforementioned advantage is somewhat eliminated. Were I to have to tell my boss that we could switch to Ubuntu but it would mean that would need to use a "MySQL compatible" database if we want to use the native database (which we likely would because it's tested to be stable and it is supported by the developers), then she would be much more hesitant.

I reckon MySQL will always be available -- this discussion is about a supported release, especially from a security POV

> There simply is a much greater sense of trepidation for those who are not significantly Linux savvy if there exists a possibility that they would have to make something work in an unfamiliar environment, especially if it were to happen unexpectedly. If we ported our www website server over to Ubuntu and then 6 months down the road we were to upgrade our Joomla version and there became an issue with MariaDB because it lacks some MySQL feature that it needs, or even that Joomla would fail to recognize Maria as being equivalent to MySQL at some point, then that would be a huge detraction against switching.

More and more software out there also state it works with MariaDB. While your particular example of Joomla! doesn't, another popular CMS like Drupal has had MariaDB on its list for quite some time. (see: http://drupal.org/requirements -- "Recommended: MySQL (or an equivalent such as MariaDB)")

> Unless assurances that any software that asks for MySQL will recognize and accept MariaDB equivalents, and that this should always be the case, and that it will retain the stability and recognized benefits of MySQL, I would encourage extreme caution in encouraging a switch. Linux is beginning to grow into areas it previously didn't reach and bringing a far

I can totally understand your concern and assure you that MariaDB developers ensure compatibility and treat it as a very high requirement. Backwards compatible is one of our goals and we've never broken that. Extensive testing and QA helps too naturally

cheers,
-c

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Open MariaDB/MySQL documentation at the Knowledgebase: http://kb.askmonty.org/


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Old 02-16-2012, 01:24 AM
Colin Charles
 
Default MySQL's future in Debian and Ubuntu

Hi!

On 14 Feb 2012, at 00:11, Robbie Williamson wrote:

> One thing to note, the primary motivator for this proposal isn't about
> moving to a more "open source friendly" application. We have genuine
> security concerns/issues with how MySQL handles and publishes their
> security updates. We can't simply update supported prior Ubuntu
> releases to newer MySQL versions, so we have to backport patches. Their
> lack of information and access to the bugs addressed makes it *very*
> time consuming and difficult for our security and SRU teams to do this.
> If we can resolve these issues, then MySQL's future in main looks much
> brighter.

As an addition to the lack of transparent security bugs, it should be noted that MySQL has an interesting release policy that may be incompatible with LTS-styled distributions. MySQL policy only aims to support 2 active GA releases at any one time.

In today's world, that is MySQL 5.1 and MySQL 5.5. If MySQL 5.6 becomes GA by April/June/October 2012 (as we suspect -- there is no roadmap/milestone), support will only exist for MySQL 5.5 and MySQL 5.6. With an average of 12-18 months in a release cycle for MySQL, this puts active support for MySQL 5.5 out by sometime in 2014. Ubuntu's next LTS release needs support for security till 2017

Today, only MariaDB is giving you 5 years of community support for every GA release out there (from the date of the GA). i.e. if a bug is reported, and it is security related, it will be backported into older releases as long as they remain in active support. There is no trigger to have a paying customer have a bug, as long as the bug is currently in one of the many supported GA releases and reported on the very public Launchpad bug tracker :-)

cheers,
-c
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MariaDB: Community developed. Feature enhanced. Backward compatible.
Download it at: http://www.mariadb.org/
Open MariaDB/MySQL documentation at the Knowledgebase: http://kb.askmonty.org/


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Old 02-16-2012, 01:29 AM
Colin Charles
 
Default MySQL's future in Debian and Ubuntu

Hi!

On 14 Feb 2012, at 20:28, Fabio T. Leitao wrote:

> Remember that MariaDB is not just "compatible" with MySQL, but it kind of IS MySQL, forked and re-branded.

I like to say that it is MySQL, branched and re-branded with additional features. It is not a fork. We rebase with MySQL on a regular basis, so you get MySQL + all the additional features we've included

cheers,
-c
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Colin Charles, http://bytebot.net/blog/ | twitter: @bytebot | skype: colincharles
MariaDB: Community developed. Feature enhanced. Backward compatible.
Download it at: http://www.mariadb.org/
Open MariaDB/MySQL documentation at the Knowledgebase: http://kb.askmonty.org/


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Old 02-16-2012, 01:41 AM
Colin Charles
 
Default MySQL's future in Debian and Ubuntu

Hi!

On 15 Feb 2012, at 00:49, Marc Deslauriers wrote:

> We are unable to determine what the recent MySQL security fixes are due
> to lack of details, and unclear commit messages.

Based on our analysis of commits and bugs, we believe the CPU (critical patch update) that Oracle released was actually for a lot of bugs that have already been fixed in past versions of MySQL. They just seemed to have decided to "bulk it up" and place it in one update. Of course Oracle has not come up with an official statement and don't seem to be interested to do so. What is clear is that these bugs are not "new", and were not found from October 2011 - January 2012. Of course we cannot be sure, but it would seem irresponsible of Oracle to state that the bugs referenced current community releases of MySQL (5.5.21, 5.1.61 - eg. http://web.nvd.nist.gov/view/vuln/detail?vulnId=CVE-2012-0492). In fact the current GA is 5.5.20, and that advisory is listed as "high" in the CPU

From a blog post by an Oracle employee that is now not online, the reference to fixed bugs were:
1. Bug #11759688
2. Bug #52020
3. Bug #13358468
4. Bug #54082
5. Bug #11761576
6. Bug #51252
7. Bug #11758979
8. Bug #48726
9. Bug #11756764
10. Bug #42784
11. Bug #11751793
12. Bug #45546
13. Bug #11754011
14. Bug #13427949
15. Bug #11745230
16. Bug #12133
17. Bug #13116225
18. Bug #11759688
19. Bug #13358468
20. Bug #63020
21. Bug #13344643

Sadly, even in his reference, there are lots of bugs that are only kept in a closed bug system that Oracle has (basically anything with more than 5 digits in the bug number reference the closed bug system)

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Colin Charles, http://bytebot.net/blog/ | twitter: @bytebot | skype: colincharles
MariaDB: Community developed. Feature enhanced. Backward compatible.
Download it at: http://www.mariadb.org/
Open MariaDB/MySQL documentation at the Knowledgebase: http://kb.askmonty.org/


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