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Rob Frohne 10-13-2010 11:46 PM

Fw: Ubuntu for School
 
Good Project!* The bigger your school is the harder it will be, but it
will be a good learning experience for you in any case, even if you
aren't successful totally.



I actually think we all need to come up with some of the tools to make
administering a lab of computers easier on Ubuntu.* I haven't really
solved this to my satisfaction for my lab.* Ubuntu actually has some
commercial software or a service that looked like it would work nicely,
but it isn't open source of cheap.* It takes far too much time to
upgrade a whole lab of computers, and just keeping them updated is
problematic.* One thing that has helped is this little sequence that
allows me to have the same packages installed on all the lab computers.



dpkg --get-selections > mypackages.txt

sudo dpkg --set-selections < mypackages.txt

sudo apt-get dselect-upgrade



Best wishes,



Rob



Best regards,



Rob



On 10/13/2010 04:17 PM, epic93dude@gmail.com wrote:


Someone at ubuntu-marketing told me to send this to you all. I'm a 15
year old sophomore in a school in the US , going to try to get my
school to adopt ubuntu. Perhaps you might have an idea what a
teacher/principal's concerns might be about ubuntu or FOSS in general.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


From: Epic93dude@gmail.com

Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2010 16:53:16 +0000
To: <ubuntu-marketing@lists.ubuntu.com>
Subject: Ubuntu for School



Hi Ubuntu-Marketing. I ama a student at a small high school in
Southwest Missouri. Recently we had an assignment in a class where we
had to give a presentation on a group/organization/movement. I chose to
give my presentation on Ubuntu. I explained what an operating system
was, then what open source software was. I explained how the open
source community worked and why Open Source Software tends to be more
secure, faster, and easier to use than Proprietary Software, and how
these benefits were present in Ubuntu, in a way that the average
computer user could understand. I also demonstrated some programs that
come with Ubuntu and how they could do many of the tasks just as well
or sometimes better than their Proprietary counterparts.




The response was great. Several students were interested in learning
more about Ubuntu and OSS after I gave the presentation. The school's
principal, who also happened to be there during the presentation, was
also interested in Ubuntu as well as the applications that I showed. I
think that there is an opportunity of some kind here to get OSS in use
at my school, because the students, teacher (of the class I gave the
presentation in), and principal all seemed to be open towards the
concept of free software.




What I want to do is get my school to at least try Ubuntu out in one of
the computer labs or something like that. I think if I could
demonstrate that it is a viable alternative to Microsoft Windows +
Office, which is what we currently use on all our computers, would save
decent amounts of money, and would give access to some pretty amazing
educational programs (The periodic table of elements program
immediately comes to mind), they would be willing to try it.




That being said, I need to be able to convince the IT staff that it
would be easy to learn, easier to manage than Windows Server Edition
(Which is what we use), and compatible with the current infrastructure
that we have. If I can do that, plus convince the administration that
we would save costs etc., I think they would consider trying it out, or
even switching over entirely.




Can you guys help me with this (especially the convincing the IT staff
part) ?



--
Rob Frohne, Ph.D., P.E.
E.F. Cross School of Engineering
Walla Walla University
100 SW 4th Street
College Place, WA 99324
(509) 527-2075 http://people.wallawalla.edu/~rob.frohne



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Diane Leikvold 10-16-2010 08:19 PM

Fw: Ubuntu for School
 
Wow, sounds like you have your work cut out for you, but don't give up.* As with all the comments, I too would suggest not converting a whole school and start with a computer lab. This is our situation and what we have learned.




I am the IT person/Computer Teacher for a small private school of 250 K-12 students and have about 30 faculty.* In July we decided to make the switch.* We use Windows 2003 Server for our file and printing server. Our SonicWall handed out our DHCP. We use Google Apps for our Email.* We were running Windows 2000 on the desktops but as of July Windows would no longer supporting it, so Ubuntu sounded like an excellent alternative.* My husband was familiar with it and was trying it out on his netbook for a couple of months prior.* (he was also a programmer and was familiar with trouble shooting issues).* We were also blessed to have received a donation of over 60 laptops shortly after we made the decision.* Before we made the switch, i tried to test as much software* I could in Ubuntu/Wine.* (curriculum software for Science, Student/Administration Management, Math ExamView, and Typing).* Installing was a breeze, and training the teachers and office staff went very well.* Ubuntu ran extremely fast.* Once school got started then the true test came and for the most part went very well but we did run into some issues:




Our student/administration software, RenWeb, worked great for the teachers as it is web based, however for administration (which is a desktop version), some of the features i couldn't get to work (email, chat support, printing, Parent Alert), but we were able to work around most of the issues by using the teachers version (web based) for emailing and printing.




We had purchased new HS Science Curriculum, by Pearson Prentice Hall also over the summer and we are still trying to make all the features work.* It is a pretty extensive software which includes a Lesson Planner, two types of Presentations, ExamView, and some other features.* It has taken pretty much the whole quarter working on it at night to get it to work.*




We ran into an issue with the Dell D800 laptops not able to run a LCD projector because of the video driver uses Nvidia.

In the Elementary computer lab, i have some computers that won't always go into screen saver and does a hibernation, which i can't seem to wake up without restarting the computer. It seems to only be affecting 6 out of the 22.*




The Yearbook class uses Jostens Yearbook Avenue web site to create the yearbook.* It is all web based so I didn't think we would have any issues, however, once the students were creating pages, they were unable to change the fonts, and font colors.* We tried Google Chrome, same thing, we tried installing Firefox and Chrome in Wine, same problem.* We finally found the fix, using Opera in Wine and the problem was solved.*




In the Elementary computer lab, the students go to mostly web based programs.* I have installed all the plugins for Adobe Flash, however there are some sites that some features won't work.* IKnowThat.com has learning games for all grades and subjects and most of them work, but some won't.* What is strange, is that a game will sometimes work on some computers in the lab and not on others, so it is being flaky.* I ran into the same problem with Wycliffe Kids Web site yesterday.* Some computers all the features would work, some would not. I always try to test the site before the kids go into the lab, but in this case I didn't catch it in time.*




Having the teachers switch from MS Word/Excel/PPT 2000 to Open Office went smooth.* I actually like Open Office better.* Although there is a learning curve especially in the area of Word Drawing features and PowerPoint.*



We kept our Windows Server, but would like to change to Linux to store files and be the print server.* In our HS computer lab, it seems the students aren't always able to connect to the server to get their files.





Having said all of this, I don't mean to discourage you, however, in a school situation, a determining factor is whether all windows software needed for administration and classes will completely run in Ubuntu.* I love Ubuntu, and wouldn't go back to Windows, however, i could see how it may be frustrating for other schools in different situations.* I also noticed that most schools in the US were using dual boot which wasn't an option for us, however i do have two computers in the school (mine) that i can dual boot to use when we run into situations where a feature will only work in Windows.




If your schools IT person was willing to have you demo Ubuntu and be willing to try Ubuntu at home or on a pc at school, that may help.* We were fortunate enough that we are a small school and were able to pull this off and work as well as it has.* I am the only IT person at the school, except from the help from my husband, but a larger school would have a larger support staff.*



Best of Luck, Diane



On Wed, Oct 13, 2010 at 5:17 PM, <epic93dude@gmail.com> wrote:


Someone at ubuntu-marketing told me to send this to you all. I'm a 15 year old sophomore in a school in the US , going to try to get my school to adopt ubuntu. Perhaps you might have an idea what a teacher/principal's concerns might be about ubuntu or FOSS in general.





Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
From: Epic93dude@gmail.com
Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2010 16:53:16 +0000To: <ubuntu-marketing@lists.ubuntu.com>Subject: Ubuntu for School





Hi Ubuntu-Marketing. I ama a student at a small high school in Southwest Missouri. Recently we had an assignment in a class where we had to give a presentation on a group/organization/movement. I chose to give my presentation on Ubuntu. I explained what an operating system was, then what open source software was. I explained how the open source community worked and why Open Source Software tends to be more secure, faster, and easier to use than Proprietary Software, and how these benefits were present in Ubuntu, in a way that the average computer user could understand. I also demonstrated some programs that come with Ubuntu and how they could do many of the tasks just as well or sometimes better than their Proprietary counterparts.



The response was great. Several students were interested in learning more about Ubuntu and OSS after I gave the presentation. The school's principal, who also happened to be there during the presentation, was also interested in Ubuntu as well as the applications that I showed. I think that there is an opportunity of some kind here to get OSS in use at my school, because the students, teacher (of the class I gave the presentation in), and principal all seemed to be open towards the concept of free software.



What I want to do is get my school to at least try Ubuntu out in one of the computer labs or something like that. I think if I could demonstrate that it is a viable alternative to Microsoft Windows + Office, which is what we currently use on all our computers, would save decent amounts of money, and would give access to some pretty amazing educational programs (The periodic table of elements program immediately comes to mind), they would be willing to try it.



That being said, I need to be able to convince the IT staff that it would be easy to learn, easier to manage than Windows Server Edition (Which is what we use), and compatible with the current infrastructure that we have. If I can do that, plus convince the administration that we would save costs etc., I think they would consider trying it out, or even switching over entirely.



Can you guys help me with this (especially the convincing the IT staff part) ?

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Caroline Meeks 10-17-2010 01:35 PM

Fw: Ubuntu for School
 
There is a program in Maine called Open 1 to 1 that might be a good case study for you. *They have a number of high schools across the state using Ubuntu in one to one netbook programs.
http://open1to1.org/index.php/Main_Page


Good luck!Caroline

On Wed, Oct 13, 2010 at 7:17 PM, <epic93dude@gmail.com> wrote:


Someone at ubuntu-marketing told me to send this to you all. I'm a 15 year old sophomore in a school in the US , going to try to get my school to adopt ubuntu. Perhaps you might have an idea what a teacher/principal's concerns might be about ubuntu or FOSS in general.


Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
From: Epic93dude@gmail.com
Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2010 16:53:16 +0000To: <ubuntu-marketing@lists.ubuntu.com>Subject: Ubuntu for School


Hi Ubuntu-Marketing. I ama a student at a small high school in Southwest Missouri. Recently we had an assignment in a class where we had to give a presentation on a group/organization/movement. I chose to give my presentation on Ubuntu. I explained what an operating system was, then what open source software was. I explained how the open source community worked and why Open Source Software tends to be more secure, faster, and easier to use than Proprietary Software, and how these benefits were present in Ubuntu, in a way that the average computer user could understand. I also demonstrated some programs that come with Ubuntu and how they could do many of the tasks just as well or sometimes better than their Proprietary counterparts.



The response was great. Several students were interested in learning more about Ubuntu and OSS after I gave the presentation. The school's principal, who also happened to be there during the presentation, was also interested in Ubuntu as well as the applications that I showed. I think that there is an opportunity of some kind here to get OSS in use at my school, because the students, teacher (of the class I gave the presentation in), and principal all seemed to be open towards the concept of free software.



What I want to do is get my school to at least try Ubuntu out in one of the computer labs or something like that. I think if I could demonstrate that it is a viable alternative to Microsoft Windows + Office, which is what we currently use on all our computers, would save decent amounts of money, and would give access to some pretty amazing educational programs (The periodic table of elements program immediately comes to mind), they would be willing to try it.



That being said, I need to be able to convince the IT staff that it would be easy to learn, easier to manage than Windows Server Edition (Which is what we use), and compatible with the current infrastructure that we have. If I can do that, plus convince the administration that we would save costs etc., I think they would consider trying it out, or even switching over entirely.



Can you guys help me with this (especially the convincing the IT staff part) ?

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--
Caroline Meeks
Solution Grove
Caroline@SolutionGrove.com

617-500-3488 - Office
505-213-3268 - Fax


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