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Old 07-16-2012, 08:59 PM
"Doll, Margaret Ann"
 
Default Which nivida drivers?

I have two systems that need Nivdia drivers, but I don't know which ones.

(==) Using config file: "/etc/X11/xorg.conf"
================ WARNING WARNING WARNING WARNING ================
This server has a video driver ABI version of 10.0 that is not
supported by this NVIDIA driver. Please check
http://www.nvidia.com/ for driver updates or downgrade to an X
server with a supported driver ABI.
================================================== ===============
(EE) NVIDIA: Use the -ignoreABI option to override this check.
(EE) Failed to load module "nvidia" (module requirement mismatch, 0)
(EE) No drivers available.

How do I find out

The Product type such as GeForce, Quadro, etc
The Product Series such as GeForce 600 Series
Product such as GeForce GTX 690 ?

Thanks for information.
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Old 07-16-2012, 09:29 PM
 
Default Which nivida drivers?

Hi, Margaret,

Doll, Margaret Ann wrote:
> I have two systems that need Nivdia drivers, but I don't know which ones.
>
<snip>
Use lshw or dmidecode, through more, and find out what it says it is. Then
go to NVidia's website, and see which driver it wants for
Linux.<http://www.nvidia.com/Download/Find.aspx?lang=en-us>

Alternatively, add elrepo to your repositories, and install kmod-nvidia -
much easier, and it'll autorebuild every time you update to a new kernel &
reboot. I'm slowly moving folks here to that.

Note you *can* explicitly make that the only thing you get from elrepo -
you do it in your elrepo.repo config file.

mark

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Old 07-17-2012, 12:35 PM
"Doll, Margaret Ann"
 
Default Which nivida drivers?

Thanks for the tip on lshw. I installed the package. I had to run it as

lshw > ~/hardware.

The hardware file then had all the information I needed. I will look at
your other suggestions because keeping up with the nvidia drivers on a
linux system is a pain.

dmidecode only seemed to give information on devices that were a integral
part of the cpu system and not to devices attached to the system such as
monitors.


On Mon, Jul 16, 2012 at 5:29 PM, <m.roth@5-cent.us> wrote:

> Hi, Margaret,
>
> Doll, Margaret Ann wrote:
> > I have two systems that need Nivdia drivers, but I don't know which ones.
> >
> <snip>
> Use lshw or dmidecode, through more, and find out what it says it is. Then
> go to NVidia's website, and see which driver it wants for
> Linux.<http://www.nvidia.com/Download/Find.aspx?lang=en-us>
>
> Alternatively, add elrepo to your repositories, and install kmod-nvidia -
> much easier, and it'll autorebuild every time you update to a new kernel &
> reboot. I'm slowly moving folks here to that.
>
> Note you *can* explicitly make that the only thing you get from elrepo -
> you do it in your elrepo.repo config file.
>
> mark
>
> --
> redhat-list mailing list
> unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
> https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
>
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Old 07-17-2012, 01:07 PM
 
Default Which nivida drivers?

Doll, Margaret Ann wrote:
> Thanks for the tip on lshw. I installed the package. I had to run it as
>
> lshw > ~/hardware.
>
> The hardware file then had all the information I needed. I will look at
> your other suggestions because keeping up with the nvidia drivers on a
> linux system is a pain.
>
> dmidecode only seemed to give information on devices that were a integral
> part of the cpu system and not to devices attached to the system such as
> monitors.
>
Yeah, lshw is quite nice, and IMO formats the info more cleanly.

mark
>
> On Mon, Jul 16, 2012 at 5:29 PM, <m.roth@5-cent.us> wrote:
>
>> Hi, Margaret,
>>
>> Doll, Margaret Ann wrote:
>> > I have two systems that need Nivdia drivers, but I don't know which
>> ones.
>> >
>> <snip>
>> Use lshw or dmidecode, through more, and find out what it says it is.
>> Then
>> go to NVidia's website, and see which driver it wants for
>> Linux.<http://www.nvidia.com/Download/Find.aspx?lang=en-us>
>>
>> Alternatively, add elrepo to your repositories, and install kmod-nvidia
>> -
>> much easier, and it'll autorebuild every time you update to a new kernel
>> &
>> reboot. I'm slowly moving folks here to that.
>>
>> Note you *can* explicitly make that the only thing you get from elrepo -
>> you do it in your elrepo.repo config file.
>>
>> mark
>>
>> --
>> redhat-list mailing list
>> unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
>> https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
>>
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Old 07-17-2012, 01:20 PM
Corey Kovacs
 
Default Which nivida drivers?

Margaret, generally speaking, dmidecode is a very useful tool. It's really
useful when you want to do things like get the gospel truth on how much ram
is in a machine, number of CPU's, pci slots, serial numbers etc. It reads
it's information from a dump if the DMI. For your case, it might have been
much simpler to just use *lspci* ? Was there any reason that wasn't giving
you what you needed? I ask because it has always given me what I needed
when dealing with NVidia drivers.

Now, if you ever want to find out what version your card/kernel is actually
using at a point in time, simply cat out...

/proc/driver/nvidia/version

I can't remember of that's exactlt right but poke around in the
/proc/driver/ directory and you'll find it. Another way is to pass *-k* to
lspci. it will tell you what driver is being used for all devices. At that
point, you could do *modinfo <drivername>*. For example on my home
system....

lspci -k

...
05:00.0 VGA compatible controller: nVidia Corporation G73 [GeForce 7600 GS]
(rev a1)
Subsystem: Micro-Star International Co., Ltd. Device 0413
Kernel driver in use: nouveau

This is what gets reported with respect to the video card.

Anyway, just some tools and techniques to get you though.

Take care


Corey


On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 6:35 AM, Doll, Margaret Ann <margaret_doll@brown.edu
> wrote:

> Thanks for the tip on lshw. I installed the package. I had to run it as
>
> lshw > ~/hardware.
>
> The hardware file then had all the information I needed. I will look at
> your other suggestions because keeping up with the nvidia drivers on a
> linux system is a pain.
>
> dmidecode only seemed to give information on devices that were a integral
> part of the cpu system and not to devices attached to the system such as
> monitors.
>
>
> On Mon, Jul 16, 2012 at 5:29 PM, <m.roth@5-cent.us> wrote:
>
> > Hi, Margaret,
> >
> > Doll, Margaret Ann wrote:
> > > I have two systems that need Nivdia drivers, but I don't know which
> ones.
> > >
> > <snip>
> > Use lshw or dmidecode, through more, and find out what it says it is.
> Then
> > go to NVidia's website, and see which driver it wants for
> > Linux.<http://www.nvidia.com/Download/Find.aspx?lang=en-us>
> >
> > Alternatively, add elrepo to your repositories, and install kmod-nvidia -
> > much easier, and it'll autorebuild every time you update to a new kernel
> &
> > reboot. I'm slowly moving folks here to that.
> >
> > Note you *can* explicitly make that the only thing you get from elrepo -
> > you do it in your elrepo.repo config file.
> >
> > mark
> >
> > --
> > redhat-list mailing list
> > unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
> > https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
> >
> --
> redhat-list mailing list
> unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
> https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
>
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Old 07-17-2012, 01:29 PM
"Doll, Margaret Ann"
 
Default Which nivida drivers?

Thanks, Corey.

That gives me the information.



On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 9:20 AM, Corey Kovacs <corey.kovacs@gmail.com>wrote:

> Margaret, generally speaking, dmidecode is a very useful tool. It's really
> useful when you want to do things like get the gospel truth on how much ram
> is in a machine, number of CPU's, pci slots, serial numbers etc. It reads
> it's information from a dump if the DMI. For your case, it might have been
> much simpler to just use *lspci* ? Was there any reason that wasn't giving
> you what you needed? I ask because it has always given me what I needed
> when dealing with NVidia drivers.
>
> Now, if you ever want to find out what version your card/kernel is actually
> using at a point in time, simply cat out...
>
> /proc/driver/nvidia/version
>
> I can't remember of that's exactlt right but poke around in the
> /proc/driver/ directory and you'll find it. Another way is to pass *-k* to
> lspci. it will tell you what driver is being used for all devices. At that
> point, you could do *modinfo <drivername>*. For example on my home
> system....
>
> lspci -k
>
> ...
> 05:00.0 VGA compatible controller: nVidia Corporation G73 [GeForce 7600 GS]
> (rev a1)
> Subsystem: Micro-Star International Co., Ltd. Device 0413
> Kernel driver in use: nouveau
>
> This is what gets reported with respect to the video card.
>
> Anyway, just some tools and techniques to get you though.
>
> Take care
>
>
> Corey
>
>
> On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 6:35 AM, Doll, Margaret Ann <
> margaret_doll@brown.edu
> > wrote:
>
> > Thanks for the tip on lshw. I installed the package. I had to run it as
> >
> > lshw > ~/hardware.
> >
> > The hardware file then had all the information I needed. I will look at
> > your other suggestions because keeping up with the nvidia drivers on a
> > linux system is a pain.
> >
> > dmidecode only seemed to give information on devices that were a integral
> > part of the cpu system and not to devices attached to the system such as
> > monitors.
> >
> >
> > On Mon, Jul 16, 2012 at 5:29 PM, <m.roth@5-cent.us> wrote:
> >
> > > Hi, Margaret,
> > >
> > > Doll, Margaret Ann wrote:
> > > > I have two systems that need Nivdia drivers, but I don't know which
> > ones.
> > > >
> > > <snip>
> > > Use lshw or dmidecode, through more, and find out what it says it is.
> > Then
> > > go to NVidia's website, and see which driver it wants for
> > > Linux.<http://www.nvidia.com/Download/Find.aspx?lang=en-us>
> > >
> > > Alternatively, add elrepo to your repositories, and install
> kmod-nvidia -
> > > much easier, and it'll autorebuild every time you update to a new
> kernel
> > &
> > > reboot. I'm slowly moving folks here to that.
> > >
> > > Note you *can* explicitly make that the only thing you get from elrepo
> -
> > > you do it in your elrepo.repo config file.
> > >
> > > mark
> > >
> > > --
> > > redhat-list mailing list
> > > unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
> > > https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
> > >
> > --
> > redhat-list mailing list
> > unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
> > https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
> >
> --
> redhat-list mailing list
> unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
> https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
>
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Old 07-17-2012, 01:30 PM
 
Default Which nivida drivers?

Doll, Margaret Ann wrote:
> Thanks, Corey.
>
> That gives me the information.
>
I'll second the thanks - I didn't know about the -k flag.

mark
>
>
> On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 9:20 AM, Corey Kovacs
> <corey.kovacs@gmail.com>wrote:
>
>> Margaret, generally speaking, dmidecode is a very useful tool. It's
>> really
>> useful when you want to do things like get the gospel truth on how much
>> ram
>> is in a machine, number of CPU's, pci slots, serial numbers etc. It
>> reads
>> it's information from a dump if the DMI. For your case, it might have
>> been
>> much simpler to just use *lspci* ? Was there any reason that wasn't
>> giving
>> you what you needed? I ask because it has always given me what I needed
>> when dealing with NVidia drivers.
>>
>> Now, if you ever want to find out what version your card/kernel is
>> actually
>> using at a point in time, simply cat out...
>>
>> /proc/driver/nvidia/version
>>
>> I can't remember of that's exactlt right but poke around in the
>> /proc/driver/ directory and you'll find it. Another way is to pass *-k*
>> to
>> lspci. it will tell you what driver is being used for all devices. At
>> that
>> point, you could do *modinfo <drivername>*. For example on my home
>> system....
>>
>> lspci -k
>>
>> ...
>> 05:00.0 VGA compatible controller: nVidia Corporation G73 [GeForce 7600
>> GS]
>> (rev a1)
>> Subsystem: Micro-Star International Co., Ltd. Device 0413
>> Kernel driver in use: nouveau
>>
>> This is what gets reported with respect to the video card.
>>
>> Anyway, just some tools and techniques to get you though.
>>
>> Take care
>>
>>
>> Corey
>>
>>
>> On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 6:35 AM, Doll, Margaret Ann <
>> margaret_doll@brown.edu
>> > wrote:
>>
>> > Thanks for the tip on lshw. I installed the package. I had to run it
>> as
>> >
>> > lshw > ~/hardware.
>> >
>> > The hardware file then had all the information I needed. I will look
>> at
>> > your other suggestions because keeping up with the nvidia drivers on a
>> > linux system is a pain.
>> >
>> > dmidecode only seemed to give information on devices that were a
>> integral
>> > part of the cpu system and not to devices attached to the system such
>> as
>> > monitors.
>> >
>> >
>> > On Mon, Jul 16, 2012 at 5:29 PM, <m.roth@5-cent.us> wrote:
>> >
>> > > Hi, Margaret,
>> > >
>> > > Doll, Margaret Ann wrote:
>> > > > I have two systems that need Nivdia drivers, but I don't know
>> which
>> > ones.
>> > > >
>> > > <snip>
>> > > Use lshw or dmidecode, through more, and find out what it says it
>> is.
>> > Then
>> > > go to NVidia's website, and see which driver it wants for
>> > > Linux.<http://www.nvidia.com/Download/Find.aspx?lang=en-us>
>> > >
>> > > Alternatively, add elrepo to your repositories, and install
>> kmod-nvidia -
>> > > much easier, and it'll autorebuild every time you update to a new
>> kernel
>> > &
>> > > reboot. I'm slowly moving folks here to that.
>> > >
>> > > Note you *can* explicitly make that the only thing you get from
>> elrepo
>> -
>> > > you do it in your elrepo.repo config file.
>> > >
>> > > mark
>> > >
>> > > --
>> > > redhat-list mailing list
>> > > unsubscribe
>> mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
>> > > https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
>> > >
>> > --
>> > redhat-list mailing list
>> > unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
>> > https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
>> >
>> --
>> redhat-list mailing list
>> unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
>> https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
>>
> --
> redhat-list mailing list
> unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
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Old 07-17-2012, 02:44 PM
Corey Kovacs
 
Default Which nivida drivers?

No worries. Glad to help.

C
On Jul 17, 2012 7:31 AM, "Doll, Margaret Ann" <margaret_doll@brown.edu>
wrote:

> Thanks, Corey.
>
> That gives me the information.
>
>
>
> On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 9:20 AM, Corey Kovacs <corey.kovacs@gmail.com
> >wrote:
>
> > Margaret, generally speaking, dmidecode is a very useful tool. It's
> really
> > useful when you want to do things like get the gospel truth on how much
> ram
> > is in a machine, number of CPU's, pci slots, serial numbers etc. It reads
> > it's information from a dump if the DMI. For your case, it might have
> been
> > much simpler to just use *lspci* ? Was there any reason that wasn't
> giving
> > you what you needed? I ask because it has always given me what I needed
> > when dealing with NVidia drivers.
> >
> > Now, if you ever want to find out what version your card/kernel is
> actually
> > using at a point in time, simply cat out...
> >
> > /proc/driver/nvidia/version
> >
> > I can't remember of that's exactlt right but poke around in the
> > /proc/driver/ directory and you'll find it. Another way is to pass *-k*
> to
> > lspci. it will tell you what driver is being used for all devices. At
> that
> > point, you could do *modinfo <drivername>*. For example on my home
> > system....
> >
> > lspci -k
> >
> > ...
> > 05:00.0 VGA compatible controller: nVidia Corporation G73 [GeForce 7600
> GS]
> > (rev a1)
> > Subsystem: Micro-Star International Co., Ltd. Device 0413
> > Kernel driver in use: nouveau
> >
> > This is what gets reported with respect to the video card.
> >
> > Anyway, just some tools and techniques to get you though.
> >
> > Take care
> >
> >
> > Corey
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 6:35 AM, Doll, Margaret Ann <
> > margaret_doll@brown.edu
> > > wrote:
> >
> > > Thanks for the tip on lshw. I installed the package. I had to run it
> as
> > >
> > > lshw > ~/hardware.
> > >
> > > The hardware file then had all the information I needed. I will look
> at
> > > your other suggestions because keeping up with the nvidia drivers on a
> > > linux system is a pain.
> > >
> > > dmidecode only seemed to give information on devices that were a
> integral
> > > part of the cpu system and not to devices attached to the system such
> as
> > > monitors.
> > >
> > >
> > > On Mon, Jul 16, 2012 at 5:29 PM, <m.roth@5-cent.us> wrote:
> > >
> > > > Hi, Margaret,
> > > >
> > > > Doll, Margaret Ann wrote:
> > > > > I have two systems that need Nivdia drivers, but I don't know which
> > > ones.
> > > > >
> > > > <snip>
> > > > Use lshw or dmidecode, through more, and find out what it says it is.
> > > Then
> > > > go to NVidia's website, and see which driver it wants for
> > > > Linux.<http://www.nvidia.com/Download/Find.aspx?lang=en-us>
> > > >
> > > > Alternatively, add elrepo to your repositories, and install
> > kmod-nvidia -
> > > > much easier, and it'll autorebuild every time you update to a new
> > kernel
> > > &
> > > > reboot. I'm slowly moving folks here to that.
> > > >
> > > > Note you *can* explicitly make that the only thing you get from
> elrepo
> > -
> > > > you do it in your elrepo.repo config file.
> > > >
> > > > mark
> > > >
> > > > --
> > > > redhat-list mailing list
> > > > unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com
> ?subject=unsubscribe
> > > > https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
> > > >
> > > --
> > > redhat-list mailing list
> > > unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
> > > https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
> > >
> > --
> > redhat-list mailing list
> > unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
> > https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
> >
> --
> redhat-list mailing list
> unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
> https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
>
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Old 07-17-2012, 07:31 PM
"Doll, Margaret Ann"
 
Default Which nivida drivers?

What are the advantages of using a NVIDIA graphics card for research
purposes? We do look at a lot of lunar and planet maps.

On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 10:44 AM, Corey Kovacs <corey.kovacs@gmail.com>wrote:

> No worries. Glad to help.
>
> C
> On Jul 17, 2012 7:31 AM, "Doll, Margaret Ann" <margaret_doll@brown.edu>
> wrote:
>
> > Thanks, Corey.
> >
> > That gives me the information.
> >
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 9:20 AM, Corey Kovacs <corey.kovacs@gmail.com
> > >wrote:
> >
> > > Margaret, generally speaking, dmidecode is a very useful tool. It's
> > really
> > > useful when you want to do things like get the gospel truth on how much
> > ram
> > > is in a machine, number of CPU's, pci slots, serial numbers etc. It
> reads
> > > it's information from a dump if the DMI. For your case, it might have
> > been
> > > much simpler to just use *lspci* ? Was there any reason that wasn't
> > giving
> > > you what you needed? I ask because it has always given me what I needed
> > > when dealing with NVidia drivers.
> > >
> > > Now, if you ever want to find out what version your card/kernel is
> > actually
> > > using at a point in time, simply cat out...
> > >
> > > /proc/driver/nvidia/version
> > >
> > > I can't remember of that's exactlt right but poke around in the
> > > /proc/driver/ directory and you'll find it. Another way is to pass *-k*
> > to
> > > lspci. it will tell you what driver is being used for all devices. At
> > that
> > > point, you could do *modinfo <drivername>*. For example on my home
> > > system....
> > >
> > > lspci -k
> > >
> > > ...
> > > 05:00.0 VGA compatible controller: nVidia Corporation G73 [GeForce 7600
> > GS]
> > > (rev a1)
> > > Subsystem: Micro-Star International Co., Ltd. Device 0413
> > > Kernel driver in use: nouveau
> > >
> > > This is what gets reported with respect to the video card.
> > >
> > > Anyway, just some tools and techniques to get you though.
> > >
> > > Take care
> > >
> > >
> > > Corey
> > >
> > >
> > > On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 6:35 AM, Doll, Margaret Ann <
> > > margaret_doll@brown.edu
> > > > wrote:
> > >
> > > > Thanks for the tip on lshw. I installed the package. I had to run
> it
> > as
> > > >
> > > > lshw > ~/hardware.
> > > >
> > > > The hardware file then had all the information I needed. I will look
> > at
> > > > your other suggestions because keeping up with the nvidia drivers on
> a
> > > > linux system is a pain.
> > > >
> > > > dmidecode only seemed to give information on devices that were a
> > integral
> > > > part of the cpu system and not to devices attached to the system such
> > as
> > > > monitors.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > On Mon, Jul 16, 2012 at 5:29 PM, <m.roth@5-cent.us> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Hi, Margaret,
> > > > >
> > > > > Doll, Margaret Ann wrote:
> > > > > > I have two systems that need Nivdia drivers, but I don't know
> which
> > > > ones.
> > > > > >
> > > > > <snip>
> > > > > Use lshw or dmidecode, through more, and find out what it says it
> is.
> > > > Then
> > > > > go to NVidia's website, and see which driver it wants for
> > > > > Linux.<http://www.nvidia.com/Download/Find.aspx?lang=en-us>
> > > > >
> > > > > Alternatively, add elrepo to your repositories, and install
> > > kmod-nvidia -
> > > > > much easier, and it'll autorebuild every time you update to a new
> > > kernel
> > > > &
> > > > > reboot. I'm slowly moving folks here to that.
> > > > >
> > > > > Note you *can* explicitly make that the only thing you get from
> > elrepo
> > > -
> > > > > you do it in your elrepo.repo config file.
> > > > >
> > > > > mark
> > > > >
> > > > > --
> > > > > redhat-list mailing list
> > > > > unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com
> > ?subject=unsubscribe
> > > > > https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
> > > > >
> > > > --
> > > > redhat-list mailing list
> > > > unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com
> ?subject=unsubscribe
> > > > https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
> > > >
> > > --
> > > redhat-list mailing list
> > > unsubscribe mailto:redhat-list-request@redhat.com?subject=unsubscribe
> > > https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-list
> > >
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Old 07-17-2012, 07:45 PM
Jonathan Billings
 
Default Which nivida drivers?

On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 3:31 PM, Doll, Margaret Ann <margaret_doll@brown.edu
> wrote:

> What are the advantages of using a NVIDIA graphics card for research
> purposes? We do look at a lot of lunar and planet maps.
>

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CUDA

--
Jonathan Billings <jsbillin@umich.edu>
College of Engineering - CAEN - Unix and Linux Support
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