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Old 09-26-2008, 08:22 PM
 
Default wrong command

On Fri, Sep 26, 2008 at 02:56:03PM -0500, mark wrote:
> kent@songbird.com wrote:
> > On Fri, Sep 26, 2008 at 01:37:03PM -0500, mark wrote:
> >> super naut wrote:
> <snip>
> >> Consider this: most of us here have some, or a lot, of systems administration
> >> experience. Things like this are something that someone should have learned in
> >> the first term or first three months of playing with *Nix. When I've posted
> >> here, it's after I've spent hours or days googling for answers.
> >
> > Clearly, you also post whenever you feel like pissing on someone for not
> > meeting your exacting standards of what a system administrator should or
> > should not do.
>
> Clearly, you cut out, and did *not* read the rest of my reply.

No, I read the whole the thing. Didn't feel it was worth copying, or
replying to.

> You know, the
> part where I said, explicitly:
>
> > Then there's folks here who come in and say "I know this, but don't know
> > that,(and even "I'm not a professional") and I've tried this, and it didn't
> > work, does anyone have any answers. Folks like that get answer, and all the
> > help we can give them.
>
> And I've posted enough help to folks who said "I'm not a sysadmin, I'm a
> newbie..." and asked a question I thought was simple, but I've answered it.

Yes, you've convinced me that you are absolutely right. That clearly makes
it OK to be a jerk to everyone else.

Best Regards
Kent

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Old 09-26-2008, 08:43 PM
"bruce"
 
Default wrong command

david...

why did he need to reinstall the entire system again?????

he changed the owner of everything to some "user". yep, this will be an
issue to some/alot of things... but depending on the circumstances, he could
over time figure out which apps/files should be "root" and then figure out
the rest later on!!

on the other hand, reinstalling might be easier, if he left the
drive/format/partitions the same.. but it still wouldn't do anything for his
own apps/files that aren't system provided.. this definitely points to a
good backup/restore process though...

god knows i walkt the tightrope line enough, with no backup/restore!!

peace


-----Original Message-----
From: redhat-list-bounces@redhat.com
[mailto:redhat-list-bounces@redhat.com]On Behalf Of David Richards
Sent: Friday, September 26, 2008 6:34 AM
To: General Red Hat Linux discussion list
Subject: RE: wrong command


As you RHCE'D and you did that! I suggest you reinstall the whole system
again. I personally don't think many people will reply because that is a
really stupid thing to do. Any good sys admin knows never to use root
and this is a good example why. I hope you will learn from your
mistakes!



--
David Richards
Network Administrator

-----Original Message-----
From: redhat-list-bounces@redhat.com
[mailto:redhat-list-bounces@redhat.com] On Behalf Of Vivek Mangal
Sent: 26 September 2008 14:20
To: Red Hat
Subject: wrong command

Hello all,

By mistake i run below command on root.
# chown <user> -R /

It changed the ownership of all directories with their respective files
then how i can recover my system from this problem ?
i think i have to change back ownership of all directories manually ?
or their is other way to do this.... ?
please tell me

--
With Regards,
Vivek Mangal
System Administrator
Red Hat Certified Engineer
Componence Portal Sevices Pvt. Ltd.
Jaipur, Rajasthan -302006
Call +91-9829681753
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Old 09-26-2008, 11:28 PM
Ben
 
Default wrong command

On Fri, 26 Sep 2008, mark wrote:


Ben wrote:


On Fri, 26 Sep 2008, mark wrote:


Ah, the meaningfulness of certifications....


This just made my friday.


<G>
Thank you!

Y'know, I've semi-joked about either doing stand-up comic, a la Lewis
Black, or running for Congress....


How are you with money?


You mean, would I force Treasury and the SEC by law to hire enough
regulators and auditors, who would be required to be all in-your-face
types, and prohibited from working in the financial industry in any way
for five years after they left the regulatory agencies?


That one, which is the funnier of the two. Don't "sell" yourself "short"
though (-:



Or did you mean me, personally? In that case, I'm "between positions", and
job-hunting madly.


Not so funny. Here's hoping you get a gig soon. If nothing else you can
always get a job as a firefighter given all the flames around here today (-:


Ben
--
Unix Support, MISD, University of Cambridge, England
Plugger of wire, typer of keyboard, imparter of Clue
Life Is Short. It's All Good.

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Old 09-29-2008, 12:18 PM
Robert Freeman-Day
 
Default wrong command

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

Bruce,

At my University, a person who was getting to know Linux did this
accidentally. In trying to rectify the situation, he was still having
issues accessing certain devices. Unless you have done some script that
parsed your permissions on a fresh install and subsequent updates or you
run a corporate *nix (Apple), you are going to have some strange issues
for quite awhile. Production machines should not have to be in that
situation, so re-installation is the best solution...nuking from orbit
is the only way to be sure!

Good luck!

Robert

bruce wrote:
> david...
>
> why did he need to reinstall the entire system again?????
>
> he changed the owner of everything to some "user". yep, this will be an
> issue to some/alot of things... but depending on the circumstances, he could
> over time figure out which apps/files should be "root" and then figure out
> the rest later on!!
>
> on the other hand, reinstalling might be easier, if he left the
> drive/format/partitions the same.. but it still wouldn't do anything for his
> own apps/files that aren't system provided.. this definitely points to a
> good backup/restore process though...
>
> god knows i walkt the tightrope line enough, with no backup/restore!!
>
> peace
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: redhat-list-bounces@redhat.com
> [mailto:redhat-list-bounces@redhat.com]On Behalf Of David Richards
> Sent: Friday, September 26, 2008 6:34 AM
> To: General Red Hat Linux discussion list
> Subject: RE: wrong command
>
>
> As you RHCE'D and you did that! I suggest you reinstall the whole system
> again. I personally don't think many people will reply because that is a
> really stupid thing to do. Any good sys admin knows never to use root
> and this is a good example why. I hope you will learn from your
> mistakes!
>
>
>
> --
> David Richards
> Network Administrator
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: redhat-list-bounces@redhat.com
> [mailto:redhat-list-bounces@redhat.com] On Behalf Of Vivek Mangal
> Sent: 26 September 2008 14:20
> To: Red Hat
> Subject: wrong command
>
> Hello all,
>
> By mistake i run below command on root.
> # chown <user> -R /
>
> It changed the ownership of all directories with their respective files
> then how i can recover my system from this problem ?
> i think i have to change back ownership of all directories manually ?
> or their is other way to do this.... ?
> please tell me
>
>
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Version: GnuPG v1.4.9 (GNU/Linux)
Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org

iEYEARECAAYFAkjgx6QACgkQup357T5MfTaV1wCgp1LnzOWrv7 8fAaSbXZVoEygQ
IHoAoJi71vSUh/zOSoF0HI6FncRULb7a
=UdDa
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Old 09-29-2008, 05:26 PM
Yong Huang
 
Default wrong command

I agree with Bruce. Whether the OP's problem can be corrected by individually changing ownership really depends on the case. If there're only a few apps installed, e.g., only Apache, PHP, and Oracle (which may be typical), changing ownership back is not a big deal.

Everybody makes mistakes. I remember when I was a DBA at a small company in 1999, I accidentally updated all customers' email addresses to the same one, because I forgot the where clause in the SQL! Fortunately, I backed up the table right before the update, as my personal habit. The problem lasted for about 1 minute and was corrected. Since then, when I chat with coworkers about what's the biggest mistake you've ever had, I tell them this story.

Yong Huang

> Bruce,
>
> At my University, a person who was getting to know Linux did this
> accidentally. In trying to rectify the situation, he was still having
> issues accessing certain devices. Unless you have done some script that
> parsed your permissions on a fresh install and subsequent updates or you
> run a corporate *nix (Apple), you are going to have some strange issues
> for quite awhile. Production machines should not have to be in that
> situation, so re-installation is the best solution...nuking from orbit
> is the only way to be sure!
>
> Good luck!
>
> Robert
>
> bruce wrote:
> > david...
> >
> > why did he need to reinstall the entire system again?????
> >
> > he changed the owner of everything to some "user". yep, this will be an
> > issue to some/alot of things... but depending on the circumstances, he could
> > over time figure out which apps/files should be "root" and then figure out
> > the rest later on!!
> >
> > on the other hand, reinstalling might be easier, if he left the
> > drive/format/partitions the same.. but it still wouldn't do anything for his
> > own apps/files that aren't system provided.. this definitely points to a
> > good backup/restore process though...
> >
> > god knows i walkt the tightrope line enough, with no backup/restore!!
> >
> > peace





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Old 10-09-2008, 03:48 PM
Dag Wieers
 
Default wrong command

On Fri, 26 Sep 2008, Vivek Mangal wrote:


By mistake i run below command on root.
# chown <user> -R /

It changed the ownership of all directories with their respective files
then how i can recover my system from this problem ?
i think i have to change back ownership of all directories manually ?
or their is other way to do this.... ?
please tell me


A reinstall would be much better, but if you like to live on the edge,
something like this should work:


rpm -qa --qf '%{name}=%{version}-%{release}
' | xargs apt-get install --reinstall

This requires you to have all the packages you have installed to be
available from a repository that is configured in apt.


If you don't have the exact package versions available, you might as well
do:


rpm -qa --qf '%{name}
' | xargs apt-get install --reinstall

On a 64bit multilib system this would become a bit more complicated but I
doubt it is impossible


If some packages are not in a repository, you'd have to filter them out
with some grep -v expression.


BTW A similar thing is possible to convert a RHEL system to CentOS or
backwards.


--
-- dag wieers, dag@wieers.com, http://dag.wieers.com/ --
[Any errors in spelling, tact or fact are transmission errors]

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