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Old 02-24-2009, 05:13 AM
Ted Potter
 
Default New Monitor

Corte


On Mon, Feb 23, 2009 at 6:29 PM, Brenda Radford <brkittycat@verizon.net> wrote:

I am running RHEL AS 4 U5.

It is an Acer H213H new-fangled monitor (it's huge).

The video card is an ATI Radeon 9250.

I have tried hooking it up with a VGA cable and a DVI cable. It made no

difference.



I tried hooking it up to a VGA monitor. The floppy disk light came on and

stayed on, so I unplugged the floppy drive and disabled it in the BIOS.

I got some text display on the VGA monitor related to the BIOS only. No Red

Hat text of any kind



I do not know how to boot up in text only mode. You will have to tell me how

to do that



I hope it is not DOA. It was working a couple of months ago. I did not have

the money to renew my Red Hat Academic subscription until today, and I was

hoping to get the box updated.



Thanks to all you guys; I hope I answered all your questions. I love this

install list.

If you can see the bios then I would expect you should see the boot loader grub
or whatever. The other idea would be to try and ping the machine if you know what
the ip address is.


Another idea - get a live boot cd/dvd and boot from that.




*



*


-----Original Message-----

From: redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com

[mailto:redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com] On Behalf Of Rick Stevens

Sent: Monday, February 23, 2009 8:43 PM

To: Getting started with Red Hat Linux

Subject: Re: New Monitor



Brenda Radford wrote:

> I think I am in trouble already because I am top posting, but blame it on

> Windows.

>

> When I turn the Red Hat box on with the new monitor hooked up, I get the

> motherboard splash screen and then the screen goes blank. I do not see any

> of the text I am supposed to see when the computer is booting up.

>

> Does that change your answer of what to try to do? I tried Ctrl-Alt-F1

with

> no results on the screen.

>

> I should have given more detail when I asked the question.



We need a bit more data:

* * * *What version of Red Hat are you running?

* * * *What monitor is it? (make and model)



Try booting in text only mode and see if it comes up. *If you don't know

how to do that, let us know, but also tell us the info above.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

- Rick Stevens, Systems Engineer * * * * * * * * * * *ricks@nerd.com -

- AIM/Skype: therps2 * * * *ICQ: 22643734 * * * * * *Yahoo: origrps2 -

- * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *-

- * * * * * This message printed using recycled bandwidth * * * * * *-

----------------------------------------------------------------------



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--
Ted Potter
tpotter@techmarin.com
Never do anything against conscience even if the state demands it. - Albert Einstein


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Old 02-24-2009, 04:30 PM
Rick Stevens
 
Default New Monitor

Bob McClure Jr wrote:

As for top posting, I don't think you have to start your reply where
MS leaves your cursor. Just arrow down to where you want to insert a
reply, open up a line and start typing there. See also

http://mailformat.dan.info/quoting/bottom-posting.html

On Mon, Feb 23, 2009 at 09:42:24PM -0500, Brenda Radford wrote:

I am running RHEL AS 4 U5.
It is an Acer H213H new-fangled monitor (it's huge).
The video card is an ATI Radeon 9250.
I have tried hooking it up with a VGA cable and a DVI cable. It made no
difference.

I tried hooking it up to a VGA monitor. The floppy disk light came on and
stayed on, so I unplugged the floppy drive and disabled it in the BIOS.
I got some text display on the VGA monitor related to the BIOS only. No Red
Hat text of any kind


Sounds like the hard drive or memory is not coming up. Does the
machine do a single beep shortly after reset or power-on? If not,
something's failing the POST (power-on self test). Power it off and
get inside the box and pull and reseat memory sticks and any add-on
cards.

If it does beep, then POST is good. Hit Del or whatever is prescribed
to get into the BIOS after the beep. Does the BIOS recognize the hard
drive? If not, power down, open it up, and pull and reseat the cables
that connect the hard drive(s) to the motherboard.

Let us know how far you get.


If it does see the hard drive, you might want to try to reset the BIOS
to its default settings. If the machine hasn't been fired up in a
while, it is possible that some of the BIOS settings got glitched due
to an old motherboard CMOS battery (that's a button-shaped battery on
the motherboard that keeps the CMOS memory holding the BIOS settings
alive when the machine's powered down). If that's the case, and once
you get the machine up, you really need to replace that CMOS battery.




I do not know how to boot up in text only mode. You will have to tell me how
to do that


As to booting in text mode, it sounds complicated but it isn't:

1. Wait for the grub menu to come up, then press the spacebar.

2. Use the keyboard up and down arrow keys to highlight the kernel you
want to boot (it's probably already selected).

3. Press "E" (for "Edit"). You'll be shown a couple of lines of text.

4. Use the up/down arrow keys to select the line that starts with the
word "kernel".

5. Press "E" again and that line of text will be displayed for editing.

6. Press the "End" key on your keyboard or use the right arrow key to
get to the end of the line.

7. Add " text" OR " 3" (that's a space and the word "text" OR a space
and the digit "3") to the end of the line. Do NOT include the quotes.
The end of the line should look something like:

rhgb quiet text
or
rhgb quiet 3

8. Press the "ENTER" key to save the line.

9. Press "B" to boot the kernel with the changes.

Note that these changes are only temporary and will work for THIS boot.
If you reboot, you'll have to do this again.



I hope it is not DOA. It was working a couple of months ago. I did not have
the money to renew my Red Hat Academic subscription until today, and I was
hoping to get the box updated.


We'll get it sorted. It's difficult to diagnose remotely and on a
mailing list to boot, but we've done far more arcane things here! :-)


Thanks to all you guys; I hope I answered all your questions. I love this
install list.


If you could, Brenda, try not to top post. It makes following the
logic of the messages difficult. It's better to place your comments
and responses below what you're commenting on (as we try to do).

Windows mail clients default to top posting, but nothing says you HAVE
to put your response there. Just use the arrow keys to scroll down to
where you want to put your comment and do it your way.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
- Rick Stevens, Systems Engineer ricks@nerd.com -
- AIM/Skype: therps2 ICQ: 22643734 Yahoo: origrps2 -
- -
- Make it idiot proof and someone will make a better idiot. -
----------------------------------------------------------------------

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Subject: unsubscribe
 
Old 02-25-2009, 12:48 AM
"Brenda Radford"
 
Default New Monitor

-----Original Message-----
From: redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com
[mailto:redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com] On Behalf Of Rick Stevens
Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 12:30 PM
To: Getting started with Red Hat Linux
Subject: Re: New Monitor

Bob McClure Jr wrote:
> As for top posting, I don't think you have to start your reply where
> MS leaves your cursor. Just arrow down to where you want to insert a
> reply, open up a line and start typing there. See also
>
> http://mailformat.dan.info/quoting/bottom-posting.html
>
> On Mon, Feb 23, 2009 at 09:42:24PM -0500, Brenda Radford wrote:
>> I am running RHEL AS 4 U5.
>> It is an Acer H213H new-fangled monitor (it's huge).
>> The video card is an ATI Radeon 9250.
>> I have tried hooking it up with a VGA cable and a DVI cable. It made no
>> difference.
>>
>> I tried hooking it up to a VGA monitor. The floppy disk light came on and
>> stayed on, so I unplugged the floppy drive and disabled it in the BIOS.
>> I got some text display on the VGA monitor related to the BIOS only. No
Red
>> Hat text of any kind
>
> Sounds like the hard drive or memory is not coming up. Does the
> machine do a single beep shortly after reset or power-on? If not,
> something's failing the POST (power-on self test). Power it off and
> get inside the box and pull and reseat memory sticks and any add-on
> cards.
>
> If it does beep, then POST is good. Hit Del or whatever is prescribed
> to get into the BIOS after the beep. Does the BIOS recognize the hard
> drive? If not, power down, open it up, and pull and reseat the cables
> that connect the hard drive(s) to the motherboard.
>
> Let us know how far you get.

If it does see the hard drive, you might want to try to reset the BIOS
to its default settings. If the machine hasn't been fired up in a
while, it is possible that some of the BIOS settings got glitched due
to an old motherboard CMOS battery (that's a button-shaped battery on
the motherboard that keeps the CMOS memory holding the BIOS settings
alive when the machine's powered down). If that's the case, and once
you get the machine up, you really need to replace that CMOS battery.

>
>> I do not know how to boot up in text only mode. You will have to tell me
how
>> to do that

As to booting in text mode, it sounds complicated but it isn't:

1. Wait for the grub menu to come up, then press the spacebar.

2. Use the keyboard up and down arrow keys to highlight the kernel you
want to boot (it's probably already selected).

3. Press "E" (for "Edit"). You'll be shown a couple of lines of text.

4. Use the up/down arrow keys to select the line that starts with the
word "kernel".

5. Press "E" again and that line of text will be displayed for editing.

6. Press the "End" key on your keyboard or use the right arrow key to
get to the end of the line.

7. Add " text" OR " 3" (that's a space and the word "text" OR a space
and the digit "3") to the end of the line. Do NOT include the quotes.
The end of the line should look something like:

rhgb quiet text
or
rhgb quiet 3

8. Press the "ENTER" key to save the line.

9. Press "B" to boot the kernel with the changes.

Note that these changes are only temporary and will work for THIS boot.
If you reboot, you'll have to do this again.

>>
>> I hope it is not DOA. It was working a couple of months ago. I did not
have
>> the money to renew my Red Hat Academic subscription until today, and I
was
>> hoping to get the box updated.

We'll get it sorted. It's difficult to diagnose remotely and on a
mailing list to boot, but we've done far more arcane things here! :-)

>> Thanks to all you guys; I hope I answered all your questions. I love this
>> install list.

If you could, Brenda, try not to top post. It makes following the
logic of the messages difficult. It's better to place your comments
and responses below what you're commenting on (as we try to do).

Windows mail clients default to top posting, but nothing says you HAVE
to put your response there. Just use the arrow keys to scroll down to
where you want to put your comment and do it your way.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
- Rick Stevens, Systems Engineer ricks@nerd.com -
- AIM/Skype: therps2 ICQ: 22643734 Yahoo: origrps2 -
- -
- Make it idiot proof and someone will make a better idiot. -
----------------------------------------------------------------------

I opened up the case and reseated the memory and made sure the hard drive
was plugged in properly and reconnected the floppy drive (I think the cable
was on backwards; I seem to remember that makes the light stay on) and fired
it up again and got it working with the new monitor. I went into grub,
changed it to text, and pressed B to boot the kernel with the changes.
Then I got these error messages:

VFS: can't find ext 3 filesystem on dev dm-0
mount: error 22 mounting ext 3
mount: error 2 mounting none
switchroot: mount failed: 22
umount/initrd/dev failed: 2
Kernel panic - not syncing: Attempted to kill init!

This cannot be good. Something is wrong with the hard drive, is that what it
all means?

FYI, I was able to boot with Knoppix.

Thanks
Brenda


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Subject: unsubscribe
 
Old 02-25-2009, 01:29 AM
Bob McClure Jr
 
Default New Monitor

On Tue, Feb 24, 2009 at 08:48:29PM -0500, Brenda Radford wrote:
>
> <some, otherwise fine, but irrelevant at this point, snippage>
>
> If it does see the hard drive, you might want to try to reset the BIOS
> to its default settings. If the machine hasn't been fired up in a
> while, it is possible that some of the BIOS settings got glitched due
> to an old motherboard CMOS battery (that's a button-shaped battery on
> the motherboard that keeps the CMOS memory holding the BIOS settings
> alive when the machine's powered down). If that's the case, and once
> you get the machine up, you really need to replace that CMOS battery.
>
> >
> >> I do not know how to boot up in text only mode. You will have to tell me
> how
> >> to do that
>
> As to booting in text mode, it sounds complicated but it isn't:
>
> 1. Wait for the grub menu to come up, then press the spacebar.
>
> 2. Use the keyboard up and down arrow keys to highlight the kernel you
> want to boot (it's probably already selected).
>
> 3. Press "E" (for "Edit"). You'll be shown a couple of lines of text.
>
> 4. Use the up/down arrow keys to select the line that starts with the
> word "kernel".
>
> 5. Press "E" again and that line of text will be displayed for editing.
>
> 6. Press the "End" key on your keyboard or use the right arrow key to
> get to the end of the line.
>
> 7. Add " text" OR " 3" (that's a space and the word "text" OR a space
> and the digit "3") to the end of the line. Do NOT include the quotes.
> The end of the line should look something like:
>
> rhgb quiet text
> or
> rhgb quiet 3
>
> 8. Press the "ENTER" key to save the line.
>
> 9. Press "B" to boot the kernel with the changes.
>
> Note that these changes are only temporary and will work for THIS boot.
> If you reboot, you'll have to do this again.
>
> >>
> >> I hope it is not DOA. It was working a couple of months ago. I did not
> have
> >> the money to renew my Red Hat Academic subscription until today, and I
> was
> >> hoping to get the box updated.
>
> We'll get it sorted. It's difficult to diagnose remotely and on a
> mailing list to boot, but we've done far more arcane things here! :-)
>
> >> Thanks to all you guys; I hope I answered all your questions. I love this
> >> install list.
>
> If you could, Brenda, try not to top post. It makes following the
> logic of the messages difficult. It's better to place your comments
> and responses below what you're commenting on (as we try to do).
>
> Windows mail clients default to top posting, but nothing says you HAVE
> to put your response there. Just use the arrow keys to scroll down to
> where you want to put your comment and do it your way.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> - Rick Stevens, Systems Engineer ricks@nerd.com -
> - AIM/Skype: therps2 ICQ: 22643734 Yahoo: origrps2 -
> - -
> - Make it idiot proof and someone will make a better idiot. -
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> I opened up the case and reseated the memory and made sure the hard drive
> was plugged in properly and reconnected the floppy drive (I think the cable
> was on backwards; I seem to remember that makes the light stay on) and fired
> it up again and got it working with the new monitor. I went into grub,
> changed it to text, and pressed B to boot the kernel with the changes.
> Then I got these error messages:
>
> VFS: can't find ext 3 filesystem on dev dm-0
> mount: error 22 mounting ext 3
> mount: error 2 mounting none
> switchroot: mount failed: 22
> umount/initrd/dev failed: 2
> Kernel panic - not syncing: Attempted to kill init!
>
> This cannot be good. Something is wrong with the hard drive, is that what it
> all means?

Well, the drive's not totally toast, since it booted partway, but one
of the filesystems is in a hurting status.

> FYI, I was able to boot with Knoppix.

Is that a live CD? If so, you can do some poking around, starting
with:

fdisk -l # that's "ell", not one
lvscan

The first will find all the physical partitions. The next will find
all the logical volumes. Let us know what they report.

For each of the partitions listed as a Linux (type 83) filesystem, run

e2fsck /dev/hdax # where "x" is the partition number

For each of the LVs (if any), run

e2fsck /dev/<vgname>/<lvname>

Make a note of which one(s) ha(ve|s) problems.

If you still have your distribution disks, boot with Disc 1, and at
the Boot: prompt, put "linux rescue".

When it asks about networking, tell it no. When it offers to mount
any filesystems, tell it "continue" (i.e. make it so). Some of the
mounts will probably fail, but if any succeed, you can

chroot /mnt/sysimage

The do a

cat /etc/fstab

and report the results.

Don't know what more to suggest until we get that information. At
that point, you can

exit # or Ctrl-D out of the chroot shell
exit # or Ctrl-D, yes, again, to reboot

After it says something about "rebooting", let it roll to see if
something wonderful happens, or just shut it down.

> Thanks
> Brenda

Cheers,
--
Bob McClure, Jr. Bobcat Open Systems, Inc.
bob@bobcatos.com http://www.bobcatos.com
Never be lacking in zeal, but keep your spiritual fervor, serving the
Lord. Romans 12:11 (NIV)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: unsubscribe
 
Old 02-25-2009, 05:36 PM
"Brenda Radford"
 
Default New Monitor

-----Original Message-----
From: redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com
[mailto:redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com] On Behalf Of Bob McClure Jr
Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 9:29 PM
To: Getting started with Red Hat Linux
Subject: Re: New Monitor

On Tue, Feb 24, 2009 at 08:48:29PM -0500, Brenda Radford wrote:
>
> <some, otherwise fine, but irrelevant at this point, snippage>
>
> If it does see the hard drive, you might want to try to reset the BIOS
> to its default settings. If the machine hasn't been fired up in a
> while, it is possible that some of the BIOS settings got glitched due
> to an old motherboard CMOS battery (that's a button-shaped battery on
> the motherboard that keeps the CMOS memory holding the BIOS settings
> alive when the machine's powered down). If that's the case, and once
> you get the machine up, you really need to replace that CMOS battery.
>
> >
> >> I do not know how to boot up in text only mode. You will have to tell
me
> how
> >> to do that
>
> As to booting in text mode, it sounds complicated but it isn't:
>
> 1. Wait for the grub menu to come up, then press the spacebar.
>
> 2. Use the keyboard up and down arrow keys to highlight the kernel you
> want to boot (it's probably already selected).
>
> 3. Press "E" (for "Edit"). You'll be shown a couple of lines of text.
>
> 4. Use the up/down arrow keys to select the line that starts with the
> word "kernel".
>
> 5. Press "E" again and that line of text will be displayed for editing.
>
> 6. Press the "End" key on your keyboard or use the right arrow key to
> get to the end of the line.
>
> 7. Add " text" OR " 3" (that's a space and the word "text" OR a space
> and the digit "3") to the end of the line. Do NOT include the quotes.
> The end of the line should look something like:
>
> rhgb quiet text
> or
> rhgb quiet 3
>
> 8. Press the "ENTER" key to save the line.
>
> 9. Press "B" to boot the kernel with the changes.
>
> Note that these changes are only temporary and will work for THIS boot.
> If you reboot, you'll have to do this again.
>
> >>
> >> I hope it is not DOA. It was working a couple of months ago. I did not
> have
> >> the money to renew my Red Hat Academic subscription until today, and I
> was
> >> hoping to get the box updated.
>
> We'll get it sorted. It's difficult to diagnose remotely and on a
> mailing list to boot, but we've done far more arcane things here! :-)
>
> >> Thanks to all you guys; I hope I answered all your questions. I love
this
> >> install list.
>
> If you could, Brenda, try not to top post. It makes following the
> logic of the messages difficult. It's better to place your comments
> and responses below what you're commenting on (as we try to do).
>
> Windows mail clients default to top posting, but nothing says you HAVE
> to put your response there. Just use the arrow keys to scroll down to
> where you want to put your comment and do it your way.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> - Rick Stevens, Systems Engineer ricks@nerd.com -
> - AIM/Skype: therps2 ICQ: 22643734 Yahoo: origrps2 -
> - -
> - Make it idiot proof and someone will make a better idiot. -
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> I opened up the case and reseated the memory and made sure the hard drive
> was plugged in properly and reconnected the floppy drive (I think the
cable
> was on backwards; I seem to remember that makes the light stay on) and
fired
> it up again and got it working with the new monitor. I went into grub,
> changed it to text, and pressed B to boot the kernel with the changes.
> Then I got these error messages:
>
> VFS: can't find ext 3 filesystem on dev dm-0
> mount: error 22 mounting ext 3
> mount: error 2 mounting none
> switchroot: mount failed: 22
> umount/initrd/dev failed: 2
> Kernel panic - not syncing: Attempted to kill init!
>
> This cannot be good. Something is wrong with the hard drive, is that what
it
> all means?

Well, the drive's not totally toast, since it booted partway, but one
of the filesystems is in a hurting status.

> FYI, I was able to boot with Knoppix.

Is that a live CD? If so, you can do some poking around, starting
with:

fdisk -l # that's "ell", not one
lvscan

The first will find all the physical partitions. The next will find
all the logical volumes. Let us know what they report.

For each of the partitions listed as a Linux (type 83) filesystem, run

e2fsck /dev/hdax # where "x" is the partition number

For each of the LVs (if any), run

e2fsck /dev/<vgname>/<lvname>

Make a note of which one(s) ha(ve|s) problems.

If you still have your distribution disks, boot with Disc 1, and at
the Boot: prompt, put "linux rescue".

When it asks about networking, tell it no. When it offers to mount
any filesystems, tell it "continue" (i.e. make it so). Some of the
mounts will probably fail, but if any succeed, you can

chroot /mnt/sysimage

The do a

cat /etc/fstab

and report the results.

Don't know what more to suggest until we get that information. At
that point, you can

exit # or Ctrl-D out of the chroot shell
exit # or Ctrl-D, yes, again, to reboot

After it says something about "rebooting", let it roll to see if
something wonderful happens, or just shut it down.

> Thanks
> Brenda

Cheers,
--
Bob McClure, Jr. Bobcat Open Systems, Inc.
bob@bobcatos.com http://www.bobcatos.com
Never be lacking in zeal, but keep your spiritual fervor, serving the
Lord. Romans 12:11 (NIV)



fdisk -l

Device boot start end ID system

/dev/hde1 * 1 13 83 Linux
/dev/hde2 14 9729 8e Linux LVM

lvscan

inactive /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 [72.62GB] inherit
inactive /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01 [1.75GB] inherit


e2fsck /dev/<vgname>/<lvname>
/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00
/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01
I got this error message for both:

No such file or directory while trying to open
The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct ext2
filesystem. If the device is valid and it really contains an ext2 file
system (and not swap or ufs or something else), then the superblock is
corrupt and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate superblock:
E2fsck -b 8193 <device>

Linux rescue gave me this:
You don't have any Linux partitions.

The chroot /mnt/sysimage
And cat /etc/fstab also failed. No such file or directory

Nothing wonderful happened when it rebooted.

Now what do I do? Do I have to start over with a fresh install?
This reminds me of a blue screen in Windows. I had one of those last
January.

Thanks,
Brenda


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Subject: unsubscribe
 
Old 02-25-2009, 05:58 PM
Ted Potter
 
Default New Monitor

On Wed, Feb 25, 2009 at 10:36 AM, Brenda Radford <brkittycat@verizon.net> wrote:





-----Original Message-----

From: redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com

[mailto:redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com] On Behalf Of Bob McClure Jr

Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 9:29 PM

To: Getting started with Red Hat Linux

Subject: Re: New Monitor



On Tue, Feb 24, 2009 at 08:48:29PM -0500, Brenda Radford wrote:

>

> <some, otherwise fine, but irrelevant at this point, snippage>

>

> If it does see the hard drive, you might want to try to reset the BIOS

> to its default settings. *If the machine hasn't been fired up in a

> while, it is possible that some of the BIOS settings got glitched due

> to an old motherboard CMOS battery (that's a button-shaped battery on

> the motherboard that keeps the CMOS memory holding the BIOS settings

> alive when the machine's powered down). *If that's the case, and once

> you get the machine up, you really need to replace that CMOS battery.

>

> >

> >> I do not know how to boot up in text only mode. You will have to tell

me

> how

> >> to do that

>

> As to booting in text mode, it sounds complicated but it isn't:

>

> 1. Wait for the grub menu to come up, then press the spacebar.

>

> 2. Use the keyboard up and down arrow keys to highlight the kernel you

> want to boot (it's probably already selected).

>

> 3. Press "E" (for "Edit"). *You'll be shown a couple of lines of text.

>

> 4. Use the up/down arrow keys to select the line that starts with the

> word "kernel".

>

> 5. Press "E" again and that line of text will be displayed for editing.

>

> 6. Press the "End" key on your keyboard or use the right arrow key to

> get to the end of the line.

>

> 7. Add " text" OR " 3" (that's a space and the word "text" OR a space

> and the digit "3") to the end of the line. *Do NOT include the quotes.

> The end of the line should look something like:

>

> * * * rhgb quiet text

> or

> * * * rhgb quiet 3

>

> 8. Press the "ENTER" key to save the line.

>

> 9. Press "B" to boot the kernel with the changes.

>

> Note that these changes are only temporary and will work for THIS boot.

> If you reboot, you'll have to do this again.

>

> >>

> >> I hope it is not DOA. It was working a couple of months ago. I did not

> have

> >> the money to renew my Red Hat Academic subscription until today, and I

> was

> >> hoping to get the box updated.

>

> We'll get it sorted. *It's difficult to diagnose remotely and on a

> mailing list to boot, but we've done far more arcane things here! *:-)

>

> >> Thanks to all you guys; I hope I answered all your questions. I love

this

> >> install list.

>

> If you could, Brenda, try not to top post. *It makes following the

> logic of the messages difficult. *It's better to place your comments

> and responses below what you're commenting on (as we try to do).

>

> Windows mail clients default to top posting, but nothing says you HAVE

> to put your response there. *Just use the arrow keys to scroll down to

> where you want to put your comment and do it your way.

>

> ----------------------------------------------------------------------

> - Rick Stevens, Systems Engineer * * * * * * * * * * *ricks@nerd.com -

> - AIM/Skype: therps2 * * * *ICQ: 22643734 * * * * * *Yahoo: origrps2 -

> - * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *-

> - * * Make it idiot proof and someone will make a better idiot. * * *-

> ----------------------------------------------------------------------

>

> I opened up the case and reseated the memory and made sure the hard drive

> was plugged in properly and reconnected the floppy drive (I think the

cable

> was on backwards; I seem to remember that makes the light stay on) and

fired

> it up again and got it working with the new monitor. I went into grub,

> changed it to text, and pressed B to boot the kernel with the changes.

> Then I got these error messages:

>

> VFS: can't find ext 3 filesystem on dev dm-0

> mount: error 22 mounting ext 3

> mount: error 2 mounting none

> switchroot: mount failed: 22

> umount/initrd/dev failed: 2

> Kernel panic - not syncing: Attempted to kill init!

>

> This cannot be good. Something is wrong with the hard drive, is that what

it

> all means?



Well, the drive's not totally toast, since it booted partway, but one

of the filesystems is in a hurting status.



> FYI, I was able to boot with Knoppix.



Is that a live CD? *If so, you can do some poking around, starting

with:



*fdisk -l # that's "ell", not one

*lvscan



The first will find all the physical partitions. *The next will find

all the logical volumes. *Let us know what they report.



For each of the partitions listed as a Linux (type 83) filesystem, run



*e2fsck /dev/hdax # where "x" is the partition number



For each of the LVs (if any), run



*e2fsck /dev/<vgname>/<lvname>



Make a note of which one(s) ha(ve|s) problems.



If you still have your distribution disks, boot with Disc 1, and at

the Boot: prompt, put "linux rescue".



When it asks about networking, tell it no. *When it offers to mount

any filesystems, tell it "continue" (i.e. make it so). *Some of the

mounts will probably fail, but if any succeed, you can



*chroot /mnt/sysimage



The do a



*cat /etc/fstab



and report the results.



Don't know what more to suggest until we get that information. *At

that point, you can



*exit # or Ctrl-D out of the chroot shell

*exit # or Ctrl-D, yes, again, to reboot



After it says something about "rebooting", let it roll to see if

something wonderful happens, or just shut it down.



> Thanks

> Brenda



Cheers,

--

Bob McClure, Jr. * * * * * * Bobcat Open Systems, Inc.

bob@bobcatos.com * * * * * * http://www.bobcatos.com

Never be lacking in zeal, but keep your spiritual fervor, serving the

Lord. *Romans 12:11 (NIV)







fdisk -l



Device *boot * *start * end * * ID * * *system



/dev/hde1 * * * * * * * 1 * * * 13 * * *83 * * *Linux

/dev/hde2 * * * * * * * 14 * * *9729 * *8e * * *Linux LVM



lvscan



inactive * * * */dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 * * * *[72.62GB] * * * inherit

inactive * * * */dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01 * * * *[1.75GB] * * * *inherit





e2fsck /dev/<vgname>/<lvname>

* * * /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00

* * * * /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01

I got this error message for both:



No such file or directory while trying to open

The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct ext2

filesystem. If the device is valid and it really contains an ext2 file

system (and not swap or ufs or something else), then the superblock is

corrupt and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate superblock:

E2fsck -b 8193 <device>



Linux rescue gave me this:

You don't have any Linux partitions.



The chroot /mnt/sysimage

And cat /etc/fstab also failed. No such file or directory



Nothing wonderful happened when it rebooted.



Now what do I do? Do I have to start over with a fresh install?

This reminds me of a blue screen in Windows. I had one of those last

January.



Thanks,

Brenda




Bob or Rick may have a different take. I say if you have nothing to lose
then why not do a fresh install. Still in reviewing this post it seems some
part of the file systems is hosed. If a recovery option exists, as a tech-guy

I would pursue it just for the learning experience. From a sys admin point of
view with the goal of having a running box do a fresh install. Assuming no
data or apps are needed from the existing install.







--
Ted Potter
tpotter@techmarin.com
Never do anything against conscience even if the state demands it. - Albert Einstein

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Subject: unsubscribe
 
Old 02-25-2009, 06:53 PM
"Brenda Radford"
 
Default New Monitor

*


*










From:
redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com
[mailto:redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com] On Behalf Of Ted Potter

Sent: Wednesday, February 25, 2009
1:58 PM

To: Getting
started with Red Hat Linux

Subject: Re: New Monitor




*


*




On Wed, Feb 25, 2009 at 10:36 AM, Brenda Radford <brkittycat@verizon.net> wrote:








-----Original Message-----

From: redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com






[mailto:redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com]
On Behalf Of Bob McClure Jr

Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 9:29 PM

To: Getting started with Red Hat Linux

Subject: Re: New Monitor








On Tue, Feb 24, 2009 at
08:48:29PM -0500, Brenda Radford wrote:

>

> <some, otherwise fine, but irrelevant at this point, snippage>

>

> If it does see the hard drive, you might want to try to reset the BIOS

> to its default settings. *If the machine hasn't been fired up in a

> while, it is possible that some of the BIOS settings got glitched due

> to an old motherboard CMOS battery (that's a button-shaped battery on

> the motherboard that keeps the CMOS memory holding the BIOS settings

> alive when the machine's powered down). *If that's the case, and once

> you get the machine up, you really need to replace that CMOS battery.

>

> >

> >> I do not know how to boot up in text only mode. You will have to
tell

me

> how

> >> to do that

>

> As to booting in text mode, it sounds complicated but it isn't:

>

> 1. Wait for the grub menu to come up, then press the spacebar.

>

> 2. Use the keyboard up and down arrow keys to highlight the kernel you

> want to boot (it's probably already selected).

>

> 3. Press "E" (for "Edit"). *You'll be shown a
couple of lines of text.

>

> 4. Use the up/down arrow keys to select the line that starts with the

> word "kernel".

>

> 5. Press "E" again and that line of text will be displayed for
editing.

>

> 6. Press the "End" key on your keyboard or use the right arrow
key to

> get to the end of the line.

>

> 7. Add " text" OR " 3" (that's a space and the word
"text" OR a space

> and the digit "3") to the end of the line. *Do NOT include
the quotes.

> The end of the line should look something like:

>

> * * * rhgb quiet text

> or

> * * * rhgb quiet 3

>

> 8. Press the "ENTER" key to save the line.

>

> 9. Press "B" to boot the kernel with the changes.

>

> Note that these changes are only temporary and will work for THIS boot.

> If you reboot, you'll have to do this again.

>

> >>

> >> I hope it is not DOA. It was working a couple of months ago. I
did not

> have

> >> the money to renew my Red Hat Academic subscription until today,
and I

> was

> >> hoping to get the box updated.

>

> We'll get it sorted. *It's difficult to diagnose remotely and on a

> mailing list to boot, but we've done far more arcane things here!
*:-)

>

> >> Thanks to all you guys; I hope I answered all your questions. I
love

this

> >> install list.

>

> If you could, Brenda, try not to top post. *It makes following the

> logic of the messages difficult. *It's better to place your comments

> and responses below what you're commenting on (as we try to do).

>

> Windows mail clients default to top posting, but nothing says you HAVE

> to put your response there. *Just use the arrow keys to scroll down
to

> where you want to put your comment and do it your way.

>

> ----------------------------------------------------------------------

> - Rick Stevens, Systems Engineer * * * * * *
* * * * *ricks@nerd.com
-

> - AIM/Skype: therps2 * * * *ICQ: 22643734 *
* * * * *Yahoo: origrps2 -

> - * * * * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * * * * *
* *-

> - * * Make it idiot proof and someone will make a better idiot.
* * *-

> ----------------------------------------------------------------------

>

> I opened up the case and reseated the memory and made sure the hard drive

> was plugged in properly and reconnected the floppy drive (I think the

cable

> was on backwards; I seem to remember that makes the light stay on) and

fired

> it up again and got it working with the new monitor. I went into grub,

> changed it to text, and pressed B to boot the kernel with the changes.

> Then I got these error messages:

>

> VFS: can't find ext 3 filesystem on dev dm-0

> mount: error 22 mounting ext 3

> mount: error 2 mounting none

> switchroot: mount failed: 22

> umount/initrd/dev failed: 2

> Kernel panic - not syncing: Attempted to kill init!

>

> This cannot be good. Something is wrong with the hard drive, is that what

it

> all means?



Well, the drive's not totally toast, since it booted partway, but one

of the filesystems is in a hurting status.



> FYI, I was able to boot with Knoppix.



Is that a live CD? *If so, you can do some poking around, starting

with:



*fdisk -l # that's "ell", not one

*lvscan



The first will find all the physical partitions. *The next will find

all the logical volumes. *Let us know what they report.



For each of the partitions listed as a Linux (type 83) filesystem, run



*e2fsck /dev/hdax # where "x" is the partition number



For each of the LVs (if any), run



*e2fsck /dev/<vgname>/<lvname>



Make a note of which one(s) ha(ve|s) problems.



If you still have your distribution disks, boot with Disc 1, and at

the Boot: prompt, put "linux rescue".



When it asks about networking, tell it no. *When it offers to mount

any filesystems, tell it "continue" (i.e. make it so). *Some of
the

mounts will probably fail, but if any succeed, you can



*chroot /mnt/sysimage



The do a



*cat /etc/fstab



and report the results.



Don't know what more to suggest until we get that information. *At

that point, you can



*exit # or Ctrl-D out of the chroot shell

*exit # or Ctrl-D, yes, again, to reboot



After it says something about "rebooting", let it roll to see if

something wonderful happens, or just shut it down.



> Thanks

> Brenda



Cheers,

--

Bob McClure, Jr. * * * * * * Bobcat Open Systems,
Inc.

bob@bobcatos.com * * *
* * * http://www.bobcatos.com

Never be lacking in zeal, but keep your spiritual fervor, serving the

Lord. *Romans 12:11 (NIV)












fdisk -l



Device *boot * *start * end * * ID * *
*system



/dev/hde1 * * * * * * * 1 * * * 13
* * *83 * * *Linux

/dev/hde2 * * * * * * * 14 * *
*9729 * *8e * * *Linux LVM



lvscan



inactive * * * */dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 * *
* *[72.62GB] * * * inherit

inactive * * * */dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01 * *
* *[1.75GB] * * * *inherit





e2fsck /dev/<vgname>/<lvname>

* * * /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00

* * * * /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01

I got this error message for both:



No such file or directory while trying to open

The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct ext2

filesystem. If the device is valid and it really contains an ext2 file

system (and not swap or ufs or something else), then the superblock is

corrupt and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate superblock:

E2fsck -b 8193 <device>



Linux rescue gave me this:

You don't have any Linux partitions.



The chroot /mnt/sysimage

And cat /etc/fstab also failed. No such file or directory



Nothing wonderful happened when it rebooted.



Now what do I do? Do I have to start over with a fresh install?

This reminds me of a blue screen in Windows. I had one of those last

January.



Thanks,

Brenda






*








Bob or Rick may have a different take. I say if you have nothing to
lose

then why not do a fresh install. Still in reviewing this post it seems some

part of the file systems is hosed. If a recovery option exists, as a tech-guy

I would pursue it just for the learning experience. From a sys admin point of

view with the goal of having a running box do a fresh install. Assuming no

data or apps are needed from the existing install.



--

Ted Potter

tpotter@techmarin.com

Never do anything against conscience even if the state demands it. - Albert
Einstein


*


Thanks, Ted. It is a learning box, not a
mission critical production box. I think I have the data on a CD I burned a
short time ago. I just need some supervision to try to do a recovery. I will
wait for Bob or Rick to weigh in before I do anything, though.







_______________________________________________
Redhat-install-list mailing list
Redhat-install-list@redhat.com
https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/redhat-install-list
To Unsubscribe Go To ABOVE URL or send a message to:
redhat-install-list-request@redhat.com
Subject: unsubscribe
 
Old 02-25-2009, 07:59 PM
Bob McClure Jr
 
Default New Monitor

On Wed, Feb 25, 2009 at 02:53:04PM -0500, Brenda Radford wrote:
>
>
>
>
> _____
>
> From: redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com
> [mailto:redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com] On Behalf Of Ted Potter
> Sent: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 1:58 PM
> To: Getting started with Red Hat Linux
> Subject: Re: New Monitor
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Feb 25, 2009 at 10:36 AM, Brenda Radford <brkittycat@verizon.net>
> wrote:
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com
>
> [mailto:redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com] On Behalf Of Bob McClure Jr
> Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 9:29 PM
> To: Getting started with Red Hat Linux
> Subject: Re: New Monitor
>
> On Tue, Feb 24, 2009 at 08:48:29PM -0500, Brenda Radford wrote:
> >
> > <some, otherwise fine, but irrelevant at this point, snippage>
> >
> > If it does see the hard drive, you might want to try to reset the BIOS
> > to its default settings. If the machine hasn't been fired up in a
> > while, it is possible that some of the BIOS settings got glitched due
> > to an old motherboard CMOS battery (that's a button-shaped battery on
> > the motherboard that keeps the CMOS memory holding the BIOS settings
> > alive when the machine's powered down). If that's the case, and once
> > you get the machine up, you really need to replace that CMOS battery.
> >
> > >
> > >> I do not know how to boot up in text only mode. You will have to tell
> me
> > how
> > >> to do that
> >
> > As to booting in text mode, it sounds complicated but it isn't:
> >
> > 1. Wait for the grub menu to come up, then press the spacebar.
> >
> > 2. Use the keyboard up and down arrow keys to highlight the kernel you
> > want to boot (it's probably already selected).
> >
> > 3. Press "E" (for "Edit"). You'll be shown a couple of lines of text.
> >
> > 4. Use the up/down arrow keys to select the line that starts with the
> > word "kernel".
> >
> > 5. Press "E" again and that line of text will be displayed for editing.
> >
> > 6. Press the "End" key on your keyboard or use the right arrow key to
> > get to the end of the line.
> >
> > 7. Add " text" OR " 3" (that's a space and the word "text" OR a space
> > and the digit "3") to the end of the line. Do NOT include the quotes.
> > The end of the line should look something like:
> >
> > rhgb quiet text
> > or
> > rhgb quiet 3
> >
> > 8. Press the "ENTER" key to save the line.
> >
> > 9. Press "B" to boot the kernel with the changes.
> >
> > Note that these changes are only temporary and will work for THIS boot.
> > If you reboot, you'll have to do this again.
> >
> > >>
> > >> I hope it is not DOA. It was working a couple of months ago. I did not
> > have
> > >> the money to renew my Red Hat Academic subscription until today, and I
> > was
> > >> hoping to get the box updated.
> >
> > We'll get it sorted. It's difficult to diagnose remotely and on a
> > mailing list to boot, but we've done far more arcane things here! :-)
> >
> > >> Thanks to all you guys; I hope I answered all your questions. I love
> this
> > >> install list.
> >
> > If you could, Brenda, try not to top post. It makes following the
> > logic of the messages difficult. It's better to place your comments
> > and responses below what you're commenting on (as we try to do).
> >
> > Windows mail clients default to top posting, but nothing says you HAVE
> > to put your response there. Just use the arrow keys to scroll down to
> > where you want to put your comment and do it your way.
> >
> > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> > - Rick Stevens, Systems Engineer ricks@nerd.com -
> > - AIM/Skype: therps2 ICQ: 22643734 Yahoo: origrps2 -
> > - -
> > - Make it idiot proof and someone will make a better idiot. -
> > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > I opened up the case and reseated the memory and made sure the hard drive
> > was plugged in properly and reconnected the floppy drive (I think the
> cable
> > was on backwards; I seem to remember that makes the light stay on) and
> fired
> > it up again and got it working with the new monitor. I went into grub,
> > changed it to text, and pressed B to boot the kernel with the changes.
> > Then I got these error messages:
> >
> > VFS: can't find ext 3 filesystem on dev dm-0
> > mount: error 22 mounting ext 3
> > mount: error 2 mounting none
> > switchroot: mount failed: 22
> > umount/initrd/dev failed: 2
> > Kernel panic - not syncing: Attempted to kill init!
> >
> > This cannot be good. Something is wrong with the hard drive, is that what
> it
> > all means?
>
> Well, the drive's not totally toast, since it booted partway, but one
> of the filesystems is in a hurting status.
>
> > FYI, I was able to boot with Knoppix.
>
> Is that a live CD? If so, you can do some poking around, starting
> with:
>
> fdisk -l # that's "ell", not one
> lvscan
>
> The first will find all the physical partitions. The next will find
> all the logical volumes. Let us know what they report.
>
> For each of the partitions listed as a Linux (type 83) filesystem, run
>
> e2fsck /dev/hdax # where "x" is the partition number
>
> For each of the LVs (if any), run
>
> e2fsck /dev/<vgname>/<lvname>
>
> Make a note of which one(s) ha(ve|s) problems.
>
> If you still have your distribution disks, boot with Disc 1, and at
> the Boot: prompt, put "linux rescue".
>
> When it asks about networking, tell it no. When it offers to mount
> any filesystems, tell it "continue" (i.e. make it so). Some of the
> mounts will probably fail, but if any succeed, you can
>
> chroot /mnt/sysimage
>
> The do a
>
> cat /etc/fstab
>
> and report the results.
>
> Don't know what more to suggest until we get that information. At
> that point, you can
>
> exit # or Ctrl-D out of the chroot shell
> exit # or Ctrl-D, yes, again, to reboot
>
> After it says something about "rebooting", let it roll to see if
> something wonderful happens, or just shut it down.
>
> > Thanks
> > Brenda
>
> Cheers,
> --
> Bob McClure, Jr. Bobcat Open Systems, Inc.
> bob@bobcatos.com http://www.bobcatos.com
> Never be lacking in zeal, but keep your spiritual fervor, serving the
> Lord. Romans 12:11 (NIV)
>
>
>
>
> fdisk -l
>
> Device boot start end ID system
>
> /dev/hde1 * 1 13 83 Linux
> /dev/hde2 14 9729 8e Linux LVM
>
> lvscan
>
> inactive /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 [72.62GB] inherit
> inactive /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01 [1.75GB] inherit
>
>
> e2fsck /dev/<vgname>/<lvname>
> /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00
> /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01
> I got this error message for both:
>
> No such file or directory while trying to open
> The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct ext2
> filesystem. If the device is valid and it really contains an ext2 file
> system (and not swap or ufs or something else), then the superblock is
> corrupt and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate superblock:
> E2fsck -b 8193 <device>

I'm guessing that's because they weren't activated, but ...

> Linux rescue gave me this:
> You don't have any Linux partitions.

If there was anything useful there, it should have found it, so it's
probably reinstall time, but I will defer to Rick's judgement. He may
(and frequently does) know something I don't.

> The chroot /mnt/sysimage
> And cat /etc/fstab also failed. No such file or directory
>
> Nothing wonderful happened when it rebooted.
>
> Now what do I do? Do I have to start over with a fresh install?
> This reminds me of a blue screen in Windows. I had one of those last
> January.
>
> Thanks,
> Brenda
>
>
>
> Bob or Rick may have a different take. I say if you have nothing to lose
> then why not do a fresh install. Still in reviewing this post it seems some
> part of the file systems is hosed. If a recovery option exists, as a
> tech-guy
> I would pursue it just for the learning experience. From a sys admin point
> of
> view with the goal of having a running box do a fresh install. Assuming no
> data or apps are needed from the existing install.
>
> --
> Ted Potter
> tpotter@techmarin.com
> Never do anything against conscience even if the state demands it. - Albert
> Einstein
>
>
>
> Thanks, Ted. It is a learning box, not a mission critical production box. I
> think I have the data on a CD I burned a short time ago. I just need some
> supervision to try to do a recovery. I will wait for Bob or Rick to weigh in
> before I do anything, though.

Cheers,
--
Bob McClure, Jr. Bobcat Open Systems, Inc.
bob@bobcatos.com http://www.bobcatos.com
Remember, O LORD, your great mercy and love, for they are from of
old. Remember not the sins of my youth and my rebellious ways;
according to your love remember me, for you are good, O LORD.
Psalm 25:6,7 (NIV)

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Subject: unsubscribe
 
Old 02-25-2009, 08:04 PM
Rick Stevens
 
Default New Monitor

(bunch of stuff snipped)
(Brenda said


fdisk -l

Device boot start end ID system

/dev/hde1 * 1 13 83 Linux
/dev/hde2 14 9729 8e Linux LVM

lvscan

inactive /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 [72.62GB] inherit
inactive /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01 [1.75GB] inherit


e2fsck /dev/<vgname>/<lvname>
/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00
/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01
I got this error message for both:

No such file or directory while trying to open
The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct ext2
filesystem. If the device is valid and it really contains an ext2 file
system (and not swap or ufs or something else), then the superblock is
corrupt and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate superblock:
E2fsck -b 8193 <device>

Linux rescue gave me this:
You don't have any Linux partitions.

The chroot /mnt/sysimage
And cat /etc/fstab also failed. No such file or directory

Nothing wonderful happened when it rebooted.

Now what do I do? Do I have to start over with a fresh install?
This reminds me of a blue screen in Windows. I had one of those last
January.

Thanks,
Brenda




Bob or Rick may have a different take. I say if you have nothing to lose
then why not do a fresh install. Still in reviewing this post it seems some
part of the file systems is hosed. If a recovery option exists, as a
tech-guy
I would pursue it just for the learning experience. From a sys admin point
of
view with the goal of having a running box do a fresh install. Assuming no
data or apps are needed from the existing install.


I'd tend to agree. There's something very odd here. The fdisk -l shows
Linux partitions on /dev/hde? You'd have to have at least five IDE
drives to get out there, and Linux now treats all drives as SCSI so they
should show up as /dev/sde (not /dev/hde) with any fairly recent kernel.

You could, theoretically, do an "fsck /dev/hde1" as it's a regular
partition with a filesystem on it. Do NOT fsck /dev/hde2 as that's an
LVM volume.

The rescue disk should have found that stuff and activated your volume
groups. You can try it again by going into rescue mode and entering
"vgchange -ay" to activate the volume groups.

Going back to the initial problem, a message such as "FS: can't find
ext 3 filesystem on dev dm-0" smells more like we have a software RAID
here and it somehow is degraded or the RAID modules aren't loaded in the
initrd image. A device such as dm-0 is a software RAID volume.


Brenda, was this configured on a software RAID?
----------------------------------------------------------------------
- Rick Stevens, Systems Engineer ricks@nerd.com -
- AIM/Skype: therps2 ICQ: 22643734 Yahoo: origrps2 -
- -
- Grabel's Law: 2 is not equal to 3--not even for large values of 2. -
----------------------------------------------------------------------

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Old 02-25-2009, 08:23 PM
"Brenda Radford"
 
Default New Monitor

-----Original Message-----
From: redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com
[mailto:redhat-install-list-bounces@redhat.com] On Behalf Of Rick Stevens
Sent: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 4:04 PM
To: Getting started with Red Hat Linux
Subject: Re: New Monitor

(bunch of stuff snipped)
(Brenda said

> fdisk -l
>
> Device boot start end ID system
>
> /dev/hde1 * 1 13 83 Linux
> /dev/hde2 14 9729 8e Linux LVM
>
> lvscan
>
> inactive /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 [72.62GB] inherit
> inactive /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01 [1.75GB] inherit
>
>
> e2fsck /dev/<vgname>/<lvname>
> /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00
> /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01
> I got this error message for both:
>
> No such file or directory while trying to open
> The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct ext2
> filesystem. If the device is valid and it really contains an ext2 file
> system (and not swap or ufs or something else), then the superblock is
> corrupt and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate superblock:
> E2fsck -b 8193 <device>
>
> Linux rescue gave me this:
> You don't have any Linux partitions.
>
> The chroot /mnt/sysimage
> And cat /etc/fstab also failed. No such file or directory
>
> Nothing wonderful happened when it rebooted.
>
> Now what do I do? Do I have to start over with a fresh install?
> This reminds me of a blue screen in Windows. I had one of those last
> January.
>
> Thanks,
> Brenda
>
>
>
> Bob or Rick may have a different take. I say if you have nothing to lose
> then why not do a fresh install. Still in reviewing this post it seems
some
> part of the file systems is hosed. If a recovery option exists, as a
> tech-guy
> I would pursue it just for the learning experience. From a sys admin point
> of
> view with the goal of having a running box do a fresh install. Assuming no
> data or apps are needed from the existing install.

I'd tend to agree. There's something very odd here. The fdisk -l shows
Linux partitions on /dev/hde? You'd have to have at least five IDE
drives to get out there, and Linux now treats all drives as SCSI so they
should show up as /dev/sde (not /dev/hde) with any fairly recent kernel.

You could, theoretically, do an "fsck /dev/hde1" as it's a regular
partition with a filesystem on it. Do NOT fsck /dev/hde2 as that's an
LVM volume.

The rescue disk should have found that stuff and activated your volume
groups. You can try it again by going into rescue mode and entering
"vgchange -ay" to activate the volume groups.

Going back to the initial problem, a message such as "FS: can't find
ext 3 filesystem on dev dm-0" smells more like we have a software RAID
here and it somehow is degraded or the RAID modules aren't loaded in the
initrd image. A device such as dm-0 is a software RAID volume.

Brenda, was this configured on a software RAID?




No RAID configuration. This box has four hard drives in it, but they are not
cabled.





----------------------------------------------------------------------
- Rick Stevens, Systems Engineer ricks@nerd.com -
- AIM/Skype: therps2 ICQ: 22643734 Yahoo: origrps2 -
- -
- Grabel's Law: 2 is not equal to 3--not even for large values of 2. -
----------------------------------------------------------------------



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