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Old 04-03-2008, 11:03 AM
k h
 
Default installing tar.gz files

Is*there any program that i can use that will simplify intalling these compressed files?* I am a newbie, and i can't figure out how to install using kompile.* In fact,*I don't even know how to get to Kompile.* I am running Kubuntu 7.10
*
Thanks!


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Old 04-03-2008, 12:07 PM
"p.daniels"
 
Default installing tar.gz files

Honestly, in the long run you're better off learning it the "hard" way (not
that compiling is terribly hard, but it can be intimidating to the n00bs).
I'd be happy to help you out; what are you trying to install?

-pd-

On Thursday 03 April 2008 06:03:01 k h wrote:
> Is there any program that i can use that will simplify intalling these
> compressed files? I am a newbie, and i can't figure out how to install
> using kompile. In fact, I don't even know how to get to Kompile. I am
> running Kubuntu 7.10
>
> Thanks!

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Old 04-03-2008, 12:11 PM
Luís Silva
 
Default installing tar.gz files

Hi!
I don't know any graphical tool that lets you do what you want. On the other
hand, what you want to do is pretty standard.

A tar.gz is a set of files that was first archived with tar and then
compressed with gzip. You will also often find tar.bz2. The difference being
the compression utility used, in this case bzip2. tar itself can handle them
both.

Here is how it goes:
1- Create a folder named BUILD in your /home/YourUserName (This is just to
keep your home tidy!)
2- move/copy the tar.gz into this folder
3- I suppose you have already used the command line before. If you did the
above in the command line just cd to the BUILD folder. If not, open a
terminal, type "cd" (without the ") (this is to make sure you are in your
home folder), type "cd BUILD".
4- Now you are in the BUILD folder, you are going to unzip and untar the file:
tar vxzf yourfile.tar.gz
The "v" is for verbose, the "x" is for extract, "z" is because you have a
gziped file (you should use "j" instead if you had a tar.bz2), and the "f" is
to say that the next word is going to be your file name.
5- now you should have a new folder there. Check it with "ls -hl"
6- "cd" to the new folder.
7- Each program in source code comes with one or several scripts that perform
the actual compilation and installation for you. Typically you have
a "configure" script there. Again, check it with "ls -hl". Run it
with "./configure"
8- If you get any errors just post them here so we can help you going through
them. If don't just type "make". This should compile your program.
9- If everything went as expected, and you want to install the program in your
system type "sudo make install" and enter your password when asked for it.
10- That's it. There are surely a lot of things I omitted. If you want to know
more about each command you used (and you should be learning about these)
type 'man command' on the command line (replacing command by what you want to
know about.

A nice thing about kde (I assume you are using kde) is that you have man, info
and help available in konqueror. So typing man:command, info:command or
help:command in the location bar gives you help on the desired command. For a
newbie I would recommend its EXTENSIVE use.

Ok! Have fun and keep trying. Don't stop just because something didn't work
the first time.
--
Luís A. C. Silva
lacsilva@gmail.com
-----BEGIN GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
Version: 3.1
GCS/S d()>$ s: a? C+++(+++)$>+++ UL+++ P@ L+++(+++)$>+++ !E---(---)>---
W++(++)>++ !N !o K--? !w---(---)?>--- O-(-) !M-(-)>- !V PS++(+) PE Y+ PGP-
t+>$ 5++ X++ !R? tv b++ DI+++(++)>+ !D G+ e+++? h?>$ !r?* !y**
------END GEEK CODE BLOCK------

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Old 04-03-2008, 12:28 PM
"p.daniels"
 
Default installing tar.gz files

Luís-
This is a great explanation. Can I post this to my blog?

-p.daniels


On Thursday 03 April 2008 07:11:14 Luís Silva wrote:
> Hi!
> I don't know any graphical tool that lets you do what you want. On the
> other hand, what you want to do is pretty standard.
>
> A tar.gz is a set of files that was first archived with tar and then
> compressed with gzip. You will also often find tar.bz2. The difference
> being the compression utility used, in this case bzip2. tar itself can
> handle them both.
>
> Here is how it goes:
> 1- Create a folder named BUILD in your /home/YourUserName (This is just to
> keep your home tidy!)
> 2- move/copy the tar.gz into this folder
> 3- I suppose you have already used the command line before. If you did the
> above in the command line just cd to the BUILD folder. If not, open a
> terminal, type "cd" (without the ") (this is to make sure you are in your
> home folder), type "cd BUILD".
> 4- Now you are in the BUILD folder, you are going to unzip and untar the
> file: tar vxzf yourfile.tar.gz
> The "v" is for verbose, the "x" is for extract, "z" is because you have a
> gziped file (you should use "j" instead if you had a tar.bz2), and the "f"
> is to say that the next word is going to be your file name.
> 5- now you should have a new folder there. Check it with "ls -hl"
> 6- "cd" to the new folder.
> 7- Each program in source code comes with one or several scripts that
> perform the actual compilation and installation for you. Typically you have
> a "configure" script there. Again, check it with "ls -hl". Run it
> with "./configure"
> 8- If you get any errors just post them here so we can help you going
> through them. If don't just type "make". This should compile your program.
> 9- If everything went as expected, and you want to install the program in
> your system type "sudo make install" and enter your password when asked for
> it. 10- That's it. There are surely a lot of things I omitted. If you want
> to know more about each command you used (and you should be learning about
> these) type 'man command' on the command line (replacing command by what
> you want to know about.
>
> A nice thing about kde (I assume you are using kde) is that you have man,
> info and help available in konqueror. So typing man:command, info:command
> or help:command in the location bar gives you help on the desired command.
> For a newbie I would recommend its EXTENSIVE use.
>
> Ok! Have fun and keep trying. Don't stop just because something didn't work
> the first time.
> --
> Luís A. C. Silva
> lacsilva@gmail.com
> -----BEGIN GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
> Version: 3.1
> GCS/S d()>$ s: a? C+++(+++)$>+++ UL+++ P@ L+++(+++)$>+++ !E---(---)>---
> W++(++)>++ !N !o K--? !w---(---)?>--- O-(-) !M-(-)>- !V PS++(+) PE Y+ PGP-
> t+>$ 5++ X++ !R? tv b++ DI+++(++)>+ !D G+ e+++? h?>$ !r?* !y**
> ------END GEEK CODE BLOCK------



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Old 04-03-2008, 12:46 PM
Nils Kassube
 
Default installing tar.gz files

k h wrote:
> In fact, I don't even know how to get to Kompile.

You should enable the universe repository, then you can install the
package kompile using your favourite package management tool.


Nils

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Old 04-03-2008, 12:49 PM
"Jonas Norlander"
 
Default installing tar.gz files

2008/4/3, Luís Silva <lacsilva@gmail.com>:
> Hi!
> I don't know any graphical tool that lets you do what you want. On the other
> hand, what you want to do is pretty standard.
>
> A tar.gz is a set of files that was first archived with tar and then
> compressed with gzip. You will also often find tar.bz2. The difference being
> the compression utility used, in this case bzip2. tar itself can handle them
> both.
>
> Here is how it goes:
> 1- Create a folder named BUILD in your /home/YourUserName (This is just to
> keep your home tidy!)
> 2- move/copy the tar.gz into this folder
> 3- I suppose you have already used the command line before. If you did the
> above in the command line just cd to the BUILD folder. If not, open a
> terminal, type "cd" (without the ") (this is to make sure you are in your
> home folder), type "cd BUILD".
> 4- Now you are in the BUILD folder, you are going to unzip and untar the file:
> tar vxzf yourfile.tar.gz
> The "v" is for verbose, the "x" is for extract, "z" is because you have a
> gziped file (you should use "j" instead if you had a tar.bz2), and the "f" is
> to say that the next word is going to be your file name.

Or you can just skip the z or j option and tar vill figure out what
kind of file it is.

/ Jonas
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Old 04-03-2008, 01:06 PM
"Jonas Norlander"
 
Default installing tar.gz files

2008/4/3, Nils Kassube <kassube@gmx.net>:
> k h wrote:
> > In fact, I don't even know how to get to Kompile.
>
>
> You should enable the universe repository, then you can install the
> package kompile using your favourite package management tool.
>
>
>
> Nils
>

To be able to compile programs you need at least install the package
build-essential.
From a console write "sudo apt-get install build-essential" without
the quotes or you
can install with one of the GUI package manager.
Depending what sources you trying to compile you may need to install some extra
libraries and header files. The are usually named dev at the end of
the package name.

BTW there are a GUI tool for compiling sources: Kconfigure
http://www.kde-apps.org/content/show.php/kconfigure?content=17183
I have not tried it and it looks like it haven't been updated sens 2005.

As already written here the best way is to learn to use the command
line it's worth it.

Good luck

/ Jonas

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Old 04-03-2008, 01:52 PM
Luís Silva
 
Default installing tar.gz files

Be my guest! Just remember, this doesn't cover cmake builds.
--
Luís A. C. Silva
lacsilva@gmail.com
-----BEGIN GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
Version: 3.1
GCS/S d()>$ s: a? C+++(+++)$>+++ UL+++ P@ L+++(+++)$>+++ !E---(---)>---
W++(++)>++ !N !o K--? !w---(---)?>--- O-(-) !M-(-)>- !V PS++(+) PE Y+ PGP-
t+>$ 5++ X++ !R? tv b++ DI+++(++)>+ !D G+ e+++? h?>$ !r?* !y**
------END GEEK CODE BLOCK------

--
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Old 04-06-2008, 02:01 PM
"Asuka Langley"
 
Default installing tar.gz files

Silvia posted a very impressive howto. (The tar explanation is the best in it.). I recommend the "CHECKINSTALL" application, what makes you a .deb from source. With this, you can uninstall (or purge) your application more easily. By the way, you can uninstall them by keeping the source then give the following command in the source folder: sudo make uninstall.


I don't think this compiling is so difficult, or takes so much time. You can use > ./configure && make && make install | if you have matter with time. But beware. Source can easily demolish your stable system!


2008/4/3, k h <bballdude1888@yahoo.com>:


Is*there any program that i can use that will simplify intalling these compressed files?* I am a newbie, and i can't figure out how to install using kompile.* In fact,*I don't even know how to get to Kompile.* I am running Kubuntu 7.10

*
Thanks!


You rock. That's why Blockbuster's offering you one month of Blockbuster Total Access, No Cost.

--

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--
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Old 04-06-2008, 05:03 PM
"D. Michael McIntyre"
 
Default installing tar.gz files

On Sunday 06 April 2008, Asuka Langley wrote:
> But beware. Source can easily demolish your stable system!

Let me underscore that several times. When I see "newbie" and "source" in the
same post, I get worried. It's really important for people new to Linux to
get used to the idea of package management first. Grabbing the source is
very rarely the way to go for most people under most circumstances.

Windows teaches people to look for software "out there" somewhere, so they go
looking for software out on the web, instead of turning to the package
manager first. Most projects have web pages where they publish release
tarballs, and I've even seen these things available at places like Tucows.
Those tarballs are mostly intended for distro package managers, and not
ordinary end users, under most circumstances.

There are exceptions, but they're rare, and newbies should definitely try to
get used to the rule before they start screwing around with the exceptions.
Ignore this advice at your peril.

Lots of people discover that the hard way. I know I did.

Hence the really important question in all of this is the one "p.daniels"
asked early on in the thread. "What are you trying to install?"

Odds are, you don't need to fool with a tarball at all, and you're playing
with matches without even realizing it.
--
D. Michael McIntyre

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