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Old 11-21-2010, 11:57 PM
Bill vance
 
Default HELP!!!!!

Howdy folks;

Having a few minor problems. I saw something yesterday that looked like it might
work on the list, so I typed in:

aptitrude update
aptitude safe-upgrade

thinking that it hjad been long enough that various bug fixes etc.,
would have been
implemented. While that seems to be the case with a couple things, some things
still didn't seem to want to install corectly.

Now however, kde is sending me numerous popup messages saying that various
of its config files are not writable. trying, "chmod a+rwxrwxrwx
.kde/config/*", didn't work, and returned a message that said It was
a, "readonly file system".

Apparently something did that to all my hard drives, so now I have to
post from the Public Library. The last time anything like this
happened, I wound up losing a
bunch of stuff for having to re-install the whole shebang.

So how do I cure my drives of this unasked for disease?

Bill

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Old 11-22-2010, 12:08 AM
"Jason E. High"
 
Default HELP!!!!!

On 11/21/2010 07:57 PM, Bill vance wrote:
> Howdy folks;
>
> Having a few minor problems. I saw something yesterday that looked like it might
> work on the list, so I typed in:
>
> aptitrude update
> aptitude safe-upgrade
>
> thinking that it hjad been long enough that various bug fixes etc.,
> would have been
> implemented. While that seems to be the case with a couple things, some things
> still didn't seem to want to install corectly.
>
> Now however, kde is sending me numerous popup messages saying that various
> of its config files are not writable. trying, "chmod a+rwxrwxrwx
> .kde/config/*", didn't work, and returned a message that said It was
> a, "readonly file system".
>
> Apparently something did that to all my hard drives, so now I have to
> post from the Public Library. The last time anything like this
> happened, I wound up losing a
> bunch of stuff for having to re-install the whole shebang.
>
> So how do I cure my drives of this unasked for disease?
>
> Bill
>

Check /etc/fstab to see if it's mounting your filesystem as read-only.

--
Jason E. High

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Old 11-22-2010, 12:39 AM
Clay Weber
 
Default HELP!!!!!

On Sunday, November 21, 2010 07:57:09 pm Bill vance wrote:
> Howdy folks;
>
> Having a few minor problems. I saw something yesterday that looked like it
> might work on the list, so I typed in:
>
> aptitrude update
> aptitude safe-upgrade
>
> thinking that it hjad been long enough that various bug fixes etc.,
> would have been
> implemented. While that seems to be the case with a couple things, some
> things still didn't seem to want to install corectly.
>
> Now however, kde is sending me numerous popup messages saying that various
> of its config files are not writable. trying, "chmod a+rwxrwxrwx
> .kde/config/*", didn't work, and returned a message that said It was
> a, "readonly file system".
>
> Apparently something did that to all my hard drives, so now I have to
> post from the Public Library. The last time anything like this
> happened, I wound up losing a
> bunch of stuff for having to re-install the whole shebang.
>
> So how do I cure my drives of this unasked for disease?
>
> Bill

K(U)buntu's packages are built more with apt-get in mind, and sometimes
aptitude safe-install can be too 'smart' and perhaps remove/not update some
important things that are needed, causing a bad mix of the old and the new .
Did you note anything in aptitude's output about what was going to be
performed before running the task?

running
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
may help fix that, followed by
sudo apt-get install kubuntu-desktop
just to make sure.

Another thing to look at is not necessarily write permissions, but ownership.
Not knowing the *exact* error message you got it can be hard to determine if
it is an ownership problem or a write-access problem, especially if there
*is* a mis-match in KDE versions.

You can make sure all your files and folders are owned by you:
sudo chown -Rv <username>:<username> /home/<username>

If you can get us the actual error message, that would be helpful.

clay

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Old 11-22-2010, 01:13 AM
Goh Lip
 
Default HELP!!!!!

On Monday 22,November,2010 08:57 AM, Bill vance wrote:
> aptitrude update
> aptitude safe-upgrade
>

Should be the same errors if you use 'apt-get'.

> Now however, kde is sending me numerous popup messages saying that various
> of its config files are not writable. trying, "chmod a+rwxrwxrwx
> .kde/config/*", didn't work, and returned a message that said It was
> a, "readonly file system".

If the only error message is on .kde/config, you can rename the .kde to
.kde_old and restart. You will have a fresh kde desktop and configure it
the way you want it; copy selected old data (like kmail) from .kde_old
to the new .kde; however, best you update/upgrade before doing this.

However, if there is more than just that, to try to resolve errors by

sudo apt-get -f install
sudo dpkg --configure -a

Then, update/upgrade to 'round up'.

Regards - Goh Lip
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Old 11-22-2010, 01:16 AM
Doug
 
Default HELP!!!!!

On 11/21/2010 08:08 PM, Jason E. High wrote:
> On 11/21/2010 07:57 PM, Bill vance wrote:
>> Howdy folks;
>>
>> Having a few minor problems. I saw something yesterday that looked like it might
>> work on the list, so I typed in:
>>
>> aptitrude update
>> aptitude safe-upgrade
>>
>> thinking that it hjad been long enough that various bug fixes etc.,
>> would have been
>> implemented. While that seems to be the case with a couple things, some things
>> still didn't seem to want to install corectly.
>>
>> Now however, kde is sending me numerous popup messages saying that various
>> of its config files are not writable. trying, "chmod a+rwxrwxrwx
>> .kde/config/*", didn't work, and returned a message that said It was
>> a, "readonly file system".
>>
>> Apparently something did that to all my hard drives, so now I have to
>> post from the Public Library. The last time anything like this
>> happened, I wound up losing a
>> bunch of stuff for having to re-install the whole shebang.
>>
>> So how do I cure my drives of this unasked for disease?
>>
>> Bill
>>
> Check /etc/fstab to see if it's mounting your filesystem as read-only.
>
If you can't boot into the system, start a live disk and work from there.
--doug

--
Blessed are the peacemakers...for they shall be shot at from both sides. --A. M. Greeley


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Old 11-22-2010, 07:16 AM
Thomas Olsen
 
Default HELP!!!!!

On Monday 22 November 2010 01:57:09 Bill vance wrote:
> Howdy folks;
>
> Having a few minor problems. I saw something yesterday that looked like it
> might work on the list, so I typed in:
>
> aptitrude update
> aptitude safe-upgrade

I'm guessing 'aptitrude' is just a typo in the message?

> Now however, kde is sending me numerous popup messages saying that various
> of its config files are not writable. trying, "chmod a+rwxrwxrwx
> .kde/config/*", didn't work, and returned a message that said It was
> a, "readonly file system".

I could also be that you have run some kind of command with root privileges.
Try:

sudo chmod -R u+rw ~/.kde

--
Best regards / med venlig hilsen

Thomas Olsen

Dropbox and my thumb drive had an epic battle. Dropbox won.
http://db.tt/T0p6d6L

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Old 11-22-2010, 03:24 PM
Jon Piper
 
Default HELP!!!!!

Hi Everyone,

I'll jump in here eventhough I haven't followed the problem all the way
through. I have had this same problem many times. Every time I have
changed distributions from SUSE, Mandrake, Mandriva, Fedora and some
others to Kubuntu. Everytime it has not been a problem with the upgrade
but with user permissions; the distributions listed above and some
others start user ID at 1000 - Kubuntu begins at 500 so all of the
permissions in the home directory are assigned to the root user. Of
course that doesn't exist in Kubuntu (unless you change it).

The solution to the problem is to change all of the files in Home
partition or folder to the user name. This can be done entirely from
Dolphin.
This is how:
1) select the View menu,
2) Select "Adjust View Properties"
3) change View Mode to "Details", check "Show Hidden Files" then click
"Additional Information",
4) check Permissions, Owner, and Groups and anything else you need (I
mark them all). click "OK".

Now you can see what the situation is and correct it by Right clicking
on a file or directory (folder). Click the permissions tab. The user
should be set to "Can View and Modify Content" and the group should be
set to "Can View Content". Un-check "Executable" and change the User and
Group to the name of the user and group who will be using the files. If
you have checked a directory, check the box at the bottom, "Apply
changes to all sub-folders and their contents". You are done if
everything works correctly; sometimes you have to do this to directories
that didn't change - that little problem has existed for 10 years that I
can attest to in every KDE distribution I have used. You can do the same
thing from the command line, but its more trouble.

Have good fun -- its a great adventure.

Blessing,

Jon Piper
***************
On 11/21/2010 09:16 PM, Doug wrote:
> On 11/21/2010 08:08 PM, Jason E. High wrote:
>
>> On 11/21/2010 07:57 PM, Bill vance wrote:
>>
>>> Howdy folks;
>>>
>>> Having a few minor problems. I saw something yesterday that looked like it might
>>> work on the list, so I typed in:
>>>
>>> aptitrude update
>>> aptitude safe-upgrade
>>>
>>> thinking that it hjad been long enough that various bug fixes etc.,
>>> would have been
>>> implemented. While that seems to be the case with a couple things, some things
>>> still didn't seem to want to install corectly.
>>>
>>> Now however, kde is sending me numerous popup messages saying that various
>>> of its config files are not writable. trying, "chmod a+rwxrwxrwx
>>> .kde/config/*", didn't work, and returned a message that said It was
>>> a, "readonly file system".
>>>
>>> Apparently something did that to all my hard drives, so now I have to
>>> post from the Public Library. The last time anything like this
>>> happened, I wound up losing a
>>> bunch of stuff for having to re-install the whole shebang.
>>>
>>> So how do I cure my drives of this unasked for disease?
>>>
>>> Bill
>>>
>>>
>> Check /etc/fstab to see if it's mounting your filesystem as read-only.
>>
>>
> If you can't boot into the system, start a live disk and work from there.
> --doug
>
>

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Old 11-22-2010, 04:38 PM
gene heskett
 
Default HELP!!!!!

On Monday, November 22, 2010 12:34:36 pm Jon Piper did opine:

> Hi Everyone,
>
> I'll jump in here eventhough I haven't followed the problem all the way
> through. I have had this same problem many times. Every time I have
> changed distributions from SUSE, Mandrake, Mandriva, Fedora and some
> others to Kubuntu. Everytime it has not been a problem with the upgrade
> but with user permissions; the distributions listed above and some
> others start user ID at 1000 - Kubuntu begins at 500 so all of the
> permissions in the home directory are assigned to the root user. Of
> course that doesn't exist in Kubuntu (unless you change it).
>
> The solution to the problem is to change all of the files in Home
> partition or folder to the user name. This can be done entirely from
> Dolphin.
> This is how:
> 1) select the View menu,
> 2) Select "Adjust View Properties"
> 3) change View Mode to "Details", check "Show Hidden Files" then click
> "Additional Information",
> 4) check Permissions, Owner, and Groups and anything else you need (I
> mark them all). click "OK".
>
> Now you can see what the situation is and correct it by Right clicking
> on a file or directory (folder). Click the permissions tab. The user
> should be set to "Can View and Modify Content" and the group should be
> set to "Can View Content". Un-check "Executable" and change the User and
> Group to the name of the user and group who will be using the files. If
> you have checked a directory, check the box at the bottom, "Apply
> changes to all sub-folders and their contents". You are done if
> everything works correctly; sometimes you have to do this to directories
> that didn't change - that little problem has existed for 10 years that I
> can attest to in every KDE distribution I have used. You can do the same
> thing from the command line, but its more trouble.
>
> Have good fun -- its a great adventure.
>
> Blessing,
>
> Jon Piper
> ***************
>
> On 11/21/2010 09:16 PM, Doug wrote:
> > On 11/21/2010 08:08 PM, Jason E. High wrote:
> >> On 11/21/2010 07:57 PM, Bill vance wrote:
> >>> Howdy folks;
> >>>
> >>> Having a few minor problems. I saw something yesterday that looked
> >>> like it might
> >>>
> >>> work on the list, so I typed in:
> >>> aptitrude update
> >>> aptitude safe-upgrade
> >>>
> >>> thinking that it hjad been long enough that various bug fixes etc.,
> >>> would have been
> >>> implemented. While that seems to be the case with a couple things,
> >>> some things still didn't seem to want to install corectly.
> >>>
> >>> Now however, kde is sending me numerous popup messages saying that
> >>> various of its config files are not writable. trying, "chmod
> >>> a+rwxrwxrwx .kde/config/*", didn't work, and returned a message
> >>> that said It was a, "readonly file system".
> >>>
> >>> Apparently something did that to all my hard drives, so now I have
> >>> to post from the Public Library. The last time anything like this
> >>> happened, I wound up losing a
> >>> bunch of stuff for having to re-install the whole shebang.
> >>>
> >>> So how do I cure my drives of this unasked for disease?
> >>>
> >>> Bill
> >>
> >> Check /etc/fstab to see if it's mounting your filesystem as
> >> read-only.
> >
> > If you can't boot into the system, start a live disk and work from
> > there. --doug

Maybe I'm just a wee teeny bit old school here, but why use a file manager
that was broken the last time I looked, when a calling up a terminal shell
and "sudo chown thatuser:thatuser *" will do exactly the same?

Please don't make the 2 second job into half an hour's fiddling, its not a
productive use of anyones time.

--
Cheers, Gene
"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty:
soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order."
-Ed Howdershelt (Author)
polygon:
Dead parrot.

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Old 11-22-2010, 05:30 PM
Clay Weber
 
Default HELP!!!!!

On Monday, November 22, 2010 12:38:53 pm gene heskett wrote:
> On Monday, November 22, 2010 12:34:36 pm Jon Piper did opine:
> > Hi Everyone,
> >
> > I'll jump in here eventhough I haven't followed the problem all the way
> > through. I have had this same problem many times. Every time I have
> > changed distributions from SUSE, Mandrake, Mandriva, Fedora and some
> > others to Kubuntu. Everytime it has not been a problem with the upgrade
> > but with user permissions; the distributions listed above and some
> > others start user ID at 1000 - Kubuntu begins at 500 so all of the
> > permissions in the home directory are assigned to the root user. Of
> > course that doesn't exist in Kubuntu (unless you change it).
> >
> > The solution to the problem is to change all of the files in Home
> > partition or folder to the user name. This can be done entirely from
> > Dolphin.
> > This is how:
> > 1) select the View menu,
> > 2) Select "Adjust View Properties"
> > 3) change View Mode to "Details", check "Show Hidden Files" then click
> > "Additional Information",
> > 4) check Permissions, Owner, and Groups and anything else you need (I
> > mark them all). click "OK".
> >
> > Now you can see what the situation is and correct it by Right clicking
> > on a file or directory (folder). Click the permissions tab. The user
> > should be set to "Can View and Modify Content" and the group should be
> > set to "Can View Content". Un-check "Executable" and change the User and
> > Group to the name of the user and group who will be using the files. If
> > you have checked a directory, check the box at the bottom, "Apply
> > changes to all sub-folders and their contents". You are done if
> > everything works correctly; sometimes you have to do this to directories
> > that didn't change - that little problem has existed for 10 years that I
> > can attest to in every KDE distribution I have used. You can do the same
> > thing from the command line, but its more trouble.
> >
> > Have good fun -- its a great adventure.
> >
> > Blessing,
> >
> > Jon Piper
> > ***************
> >
> > On 11/21/2010 09:16 PM, Doug wrote:
> > > On 11/21/2010 08:08 PM, Jason E. High wrote:
> > >> On 11/21/2010 07:57 PM, Bill vance wrote:
> > >>> Howdy folks;
> > >>>
> > >>> Having a few minor problems. I saw something yesterday that looked
> > >>> like it might
> > >>>
> > >>> work on the list, so I typed in:
> > >>> aptitrude update
> > >>> aptitude safe-upgrade
> > >>>
> > >>> thinking that it hjad been long enough that various bug fixes etc.,
> > >>> would have been
> > >>> implemented. While that seems to be the case with a couple things,
> > >>> some things still didn't seem to want to install corectly.
> > >>>
> > >>> Now however, kde is sending me numerous popup messages saying that
> > >>> various of its config files are not writable. trying, "chmod
> > >>> a+rwxrwxrwx .kde/config/*", didn't work, and returned a message
> > >>> that said It was a, "readonly file system".
> > >>>
> > >>> Apparently something did that to all my hard drives, so now I have
> > >>> to post from the Public Library. The last time anything like this
> > >>> happened, I wound up losing a
> > >>> bunch of stuff for having to re-install the whole shebang.
> > >>>
> > >>> So how do I cure my drives of this unasked for disease?
> > >>>
> > >>> Bill
> > >>
> > >> Check /etc/fstab to see if it's mounting your filesystem as
> > >> read-only.
> > >
> > > If you can't boot into the system, start a live disk and work from
> > > there. --doug
>
> Maybe I'm just a wee teeny bit old school here, but why use a file manager
> that was broken the last time I looked, when a calling up a terminal shell
> and "sudo chown thatuser:thatuser *" will do exactly the same?
>
> Please don't make the 2 second job into half an hour's fiddling, its not a
> productive use of anyones time.

While the file manager isn't broken, the fact remains that the OP can't login
to a gui desktop to use one. Which is why I gave the chown command to use.
Though if the OP has another desktop environmment installrd (gnome, fluxbox,
etc) it still could be done the gooey way from there

clay

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Old 11-22-2010, 06:34 PM
gene heskett
 
Default HELP!!!!!

On Monday, November 22, 2010 02:25:12 pm Clay Weber did opine:

> On Monday, November 22, 2010 12:38:53 pm gene heskett wrote:
> > On Monday, November 22, 2010 12:34:36 pm Jon Piper did opine:
> > > Hi Everyone,
> > >
> > > I'll jump in here eventhough I haven't followed the problem all the
> > > way through. I have had this same problem many times. Every time I
> > > have changed distributions from SUSE, Mandrake, Mandriva, Fedora
> > > and some others to Kubuntu. Everytime it has not been a problem
> > > with the upgrade but with user permissions; the distributions
> > > listed above and some others start user ID at 1000 - Kubuntu begins
> > > at 500 so all of the permissions in the home directory are assigned
> > > to the root user. Of course that doesn't exist in Kubuntu (unless
> > > you change it).
> > >
> > > The solution to the problem is to change all of the files in Home
> > > partition or folder to the user name. This can be done entirely
> > > from Dolphin.
> > > This is how:
> > > 1) select the View menu,
> > > 2) Select "Adjust View Properties"
> > > 3) change View Mode to "Details", check "Show Hidden Files" then
> > > click "Additional Information",
> > > 4) check Permissions, Owner, and Groups and anything else you need
> > > (I mark them all). click "OK".
> > >
> > > Now you can see what the situation is and correct it by Right
> > > clicking on a file or directory (folder). Click the permissions
> > > tab. The user should be set to "Can View and Modify Content" and
> > > the group should be set to "Can View Content". Un-check
> > > "Executable" and change the User and Group to the name of the user
> > > and group who will be using the files. If you have checked a
> > > directory, check the box at the bottom, "Apply changes to all
> > > sub-folders and their contents". You are done if everything works
> > > correctly; sometimes you have to do this to directories that didn't
> > > change - that little problem has existed for 10 years that I can
> > > attest to in every KDE distribution I have used. You can do the
> > > same thing from the command line, but its more trouble.
> > >
> > > Have good fun -- its a great adventure.
> > >
> > > Blessing,
> > >
> > > Jon Piper
> > > ***************
> > >
> > > On 11/21/2010 09:16 PM, Doug wrote:
> > > > On 11/21/2010 08:08 PM, Jason E. High wrote:
> > > >> On 11/21/2010 07:57 PM, Bill vance wrote:
> > > >>> Howdy folks;
> > > >>>
> > > >>> Having a few minor problems. I saw something yesterday that
> > > >>> looked like it might
> > > >>>
> > > >>> work on the list, so I typed in:
> > > >>> aptitrude update
> > > >>> aptitude safe-upgrade
> > > >>>
> > > >>> thinking that it hjad been long enough that various bug fixes
> > > >>> etc., would have been
> > > >>> implemented. While that seems to be the case with a couple
> > > >>> things, some things still didn't seem to want to install
> > > >>> corectly.
> > > >>>
> > > >>> Now however, kde is sending me numerous popup messages saying
> > > >>> that various of its config files are not writable. trying,
> > > >>> "chmod a+rwxrwxrwx .kde/config/*", didn't work, and returned a
> > > >>> message that said It was a, "readonly file system".
> > > >>>
> > > >>> Apparently something did that to all my hard drives, so now I
> > > >>> have to post from the Public Library. The last time anything
> > > >>> like this happened, I wound up losing a
> > > >>> bunch of stuff for having to re-install the whole shebang.
> > > >>>
> > > >>> So how do I cure my drives of this unasked for disease?
> > > >>>
> > > >>> Bill
> > > >>
> > > >> Check /etc/fstab to see if it's mounting your filesystem as
> > > >> read-only.
> > > >
> > > > If you can't boot into the system, start a live disk and work from
> > > > there. --doug
> >
> > Maybe I'm just a wee teeny bit old school here, but why use a file
> > manager that was broken the last time I looked, when a calling up a
> > terminal shell and "sudo chown thatuser:thatuser *" will do exactly
> > the same?
> >
> > Please don't make the 2 second job into half an hour's fiddling, its
> > not a productive use of anyones time.
>
> While the file manager isn't broken, the fact remains that the OP can't
> login to a gui desktop to use one. Which is why I gave the chown
> command to use. Though if the OP has another desktop environmment
> installrd (gnome, fluxbox, etc) it still could be done the gooey way
> from there
>
> clay

IF he can get perms for the gui to do its magic. yes. but that is only
possible if the gui knows enough to issue the sudo and fwd his response
back to the sudo command, _and_ if that user is in the sudoers list.

Some distro's (you know who you are) do NOT automatically add the first user
to the sudoers list, and that is inexcusable if they do not setup the root
account with its own password. I have fiddled around, even going so far as
to reboot to single mode in order to fix that. There is security, and there
is terminal annoyance of the user over such, so next time he tries a
different distro, and no one can blame him.

Yeah, I'm a little jaded this morning, but that is how I see it after about
13 years of linux only use dating back to RH-5.0.

--
Cheers, Gene
"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty:
soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order."
-Ed Howdershelt (Author)
Living in New York City gives people real incentives to want things that
nobody else wants.
-- Andy Warhol

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