FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > Ubuntu > Kubuntu User

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 01-03-2008, 05:29 AM
Nils Kassube
 
Default Dolphin Can't save Bookmarks?

Terence Simpson wrote:
> Nils Kassube wrote:
> > Terence Simpson wrote:
> >> expanding on what deguz said, "sudo -r chown $(whoami):
> >> ~/.kde/share/apps/d3lphin/" will fix that.
> >
> > I think the command should rather be this:
> >
> > sudo chown -R $(whoami):$(whoami) ~/.kde/share/apps/d3lphin/
> >
> >
> > Nils
>
> Both work, if you don't fill in a group it uses your primary group.

Ah, it is nice to learn something new on this list every other day.
However, the second $(whoami) wasn't the reason for my mail. The real
reason was that there is no sudo option "-r" or command "-r".

OTOH, to make sure there is no other file left with wrong permissions, it
might be wise to change the entire $HOME or at least $HOME/.kde/
directory.


Nils

--
kubuntu-users mailing list
kubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/kubuntu-users
 
Old 01-03-2008, 06:23 AM
Terence Simpson
 
Default Dolphin Can't save Bookmarks?

Nils Kassube wrote:
> Terence Simpson wrote:
>
>> Nils Kassube wrote:
>>
>>> Terence Simpson wrote:
>>>
>>>> expanding on what deguz said, "sudo -r chown $(whoami):
>>>> ~/.kde/share/apps/d3lphin/" will fix that.
>>>>
>>> I think the command should rather be this:
>>>
>>> sudo chown -R $(whoami):$(whoami) ~/.kde/share/apps/d3lphin/
>>>
>>>
>>> Nils
>>>
>> Both work, if you don't fill in a group it uses your primary group.
>>
>
> Ah, it is nice to learn something new on this list every other day.
> However, the second $(whoami) wasn't the reason for my mail. The real
> reason was that there is no sudo option "-r" or command "-r".
>
> OTOH, to make sure there is no other file left with wrong permissions, it
> might be wise to change the entire $HOME or at least $HOME/.kde/
> directory.
>
>
> Nils
>
>
Well, yes, that's the quick and dirty way
As long as you don't change the actual permissions (just the user:group)
that would be 100% safe to do.

Terence


--
kubuntu-users mailing list
kubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/kubuntu-users
 
Old 01-03-2008, 10:31 AM
Gene Heskett
 
Default Dolphin Can't save Bookmarks?

On Thursday 03 January 2008, Nils Kassube wrote:
>Terence Simpson wrote:
>> Nils Kassube wrote:
>> > Terence Simpson wrote:
>> >> expanding on what deguz said, "sudo -r chown $(whoami):
>> >> ~/.kde/share/apps/d3lphin/" will fix that.
>> >
>> > I think the command should rather be this:
>> >
>> > sudo chown -R $(whoami):$(whoami) ~/.kde/share/apps/d3lphin/
>> >
>> >
>> > Nils
>>
>> Both work, if you don't fill in a group it uses your primary group.
>
>Ah, it is nice to learn something new on this list every other day.
>However, the second $(whoami) wasn't the reason for my mail. The real
>reason was that there is no sudo option "-r" or command "-r".
>
>OTOH, to make sure there is no other file left with wrong permissions, it
>might be wise to change the entire $HOME or at least $HOME/.kde/
>directory.
>
>
>Nils

You missed the fact its an uppercase -R, it means chown/chmod etc should
operate recursively into any subdirs it finds in the given path.

--
Cheers, Gene
"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty:
soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order."
-Ed Howdershelt (Author)
static from nylon underwear

--
kubuntu-users mailing list
kubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/kubuntu-users
 
Old 01-04-2008, 11:04 PM
Clark
 
Default Dolphin Can't save Bookmarks?

Terence Simpson wrote:

Nils Kassube wrote:


Terence Simpson wrote:



expanding on what deguz said, "sudo -r chown $(whoami):
~/.kde/share/apps/d3lphin/" will fix that.



I think the command should rather be this:

sudo chown -R $(whoami):$(whoami) ~/.kde/share/apps/d3lphin/


Nils




Both work, if you don't fill in a group it uses your primary group.

Terence




Whatever the niceties of the options above, all way above my head, by
inserting a literal copy including spaces and Capitals,* Dolphin no
longer does peculiar things on shut down.* Is Sudo the Linux command
language and if so where do I access the hand book?



Thanks Terence and Nils,



Clark.



--
kubuntu-users mailing list
kubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/kubuntu-users
 
Old 01-05-2008, 12:19 AM
"Andrew Jarrett"
 
Default Dolphin Can't save Bookmarks?

On Jan 4, 2008 7:04 PM, Clark <cpmcc@optusnet.com.au> wrote:
> Whatever the niceties of the options above, all way above my head, by
> inserting a literal copy including spaces and Capitals, Dolphin no longer
> does peculiar things on shut down. Is Sudo the Linux command language and
> if so where do I access the hand book?
>
> Thanks Terence and Nils,
>
> Clark.

Let's break this down for you

sudo chown -R $(whoami):$(whoami) ~/.kde/share/apps/d3lphin/

Sudo -- is not the Linux command language, it is actually a program.
Sudo let's you (a normal user) *DO* things as a *Super User* (not sure
if that's officially what it stands for, but that's how I think about
it). This is useful when you want to tamper with system files or run
certain commands and you don't want to login as root (which is
actually disabled by default in K/Ubuntu for security concerns). When
you run a command with "sudo" at the front, it means that the system
will run the command like you are root and not a normal user. In your
case, you needed to have sudo at the front of the command because you
were changing the ownership of all the files in a directory and root
is the only user allowed to make those kinds of changes. If you now
understand the concept of "sudo", then congratulations, you have
become geeky enough to chuckle at this comic:
http://xkcd.com/149/

chown -- CHange OWNership. Changes the ownership of a given file or directory.

-R -- this option means that chown will change the ownership of the
directory *Recursively*, meaning that it will change the ownership of
_everything_ (file or folder) within the given folder.

$(whoami):$(whoami) -- this may seem complex, but really isn't.
Whoami is a program that returns the name of the user that runs the
program. If your user is "clark" then running whoami will return
"clark". $(whoami) is just a dynamic way of specifying the user/group
and, if your user is "clark", $(whoami):$(whoami) is semantically
equal to saying clark:clark. The purpose of this part of the command
was to specify the user (clark) and group (clark) that would be the
new owner of the directory; note that before the colon you are
specifying the user and after you are specifying the group
(user:group). If you really want to know what a group is, do some
independent research.

~/.kde/share/apps/d3lphin/ -- this is the folder of which the
ownership you are changing. The folder "~/.kde/share/apps/d3lphin/"
contains user-specific settings and other stuff you probably don't
care much about (unless, as in your case, the folder belongs to the
wrong user). The "~/" is a shortcut for saying "/home/clark/"
(assuming the name of your user is "clark" again). The "." in ".kde"
means that the folder is hidden. This also works for hiding files.

I hope this clears up some of the confusion.

Note: The official language of the Linux shell is called shell script.
There are _plenty_ of online and offline resources for shell script.
Try googling "bash shell script tutorials" or picking up an O'Reilly
book.

Andrew

--
45 5F E1 04 22 CA 29 C4 93 3F 95 05 2B 79 2A B2

--
kubuntu-users mailing list
kubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/kubuntu-users
 
Old 01-05-2008, 12:53 AM
Stew Schneider
 
Default Dolphin Can't save Bookmarks?

Andrew Jarrett wrote:
> On Jan 4, 2008 7:04 PM, Clark <cpmcc@optusnet.com.au> wrote:
>
>> Whatever the niceties of the options above, all way above my head, by
>> inserting a literal copy including spaces and Capitals, Dolphin no longer
>> does peculiar things on shut down. Is Sudo the Linux command language and
>> if so where do I access the hand book?
>>
>> Thanks Terence and Nils,
>>
>> Clark.
>>
Andrew has done a smashing job of explaining this, but it occurred to me
that there may be one piece of it that is still puzzling to you, if you
are coming from the Windows world.

One of the reasons Linux is more secure than Windows is the idea of
"permissions". A permission (as applied to a file) means just that --
what a particular user can do with a particular file. In Windows, you're
constantly running as superuser (Computer Administrator) unless you
specifically don't (Limited User). That means you can do as my father
did with the first computer I gave him -- delete all those files that he
didn't know what they were. In his case, that would have been the
operating system.

In a *nix system, those files belong to a user called root, and only
that user can write or change them, because the permissions are set up
that way.

Let's say you had a system file and you looked at it with the command ls
-l, which is like dir in the command window of a Windows box. You'd see
something like:

-rwx------ 1 root root 9248 2007-03-03 22:37 important.fl

The file is owned by the user root, and belongs to the group root. It
was created 03/03/2007 at 22:37 and is named important.fl

Now, in a Windows system, running as a computer administrator, you could
do anything you wanted to this file, even delete it. In Linux, only the
owner could do anything with this file, because of the way the
permissions are set.
-rwx --- ---

I divided the permissions up into three sections for clarity. The first
section, rwx, means that the owner (root) can read, write or execute the
file. The next group of three, ---, are the group permissions. A member
of the root group who *isn't* root can do nothing with the file. The
last three are similarly the permissions for everybody else, and they
can't do anything with it, either.

By carefully setting the permissions and ownership of files (and
commands are files, too), you can control who can do what to which file.

Pulling it together, something in your Dolphin installation made the
file belong to somebody other than you. So, you need to change the
ownership to fix it. Let's say the file (sitting in your ,kde folder)
was called myfile. ls -l might show:

-rwxr-xr-x bruce bruce 9248 2007-03-03 22:37 myfile

For it to operate properly, assume it needs to be:

-rwxr-xr-x clark clark 9248 2007-03-03 22:37 myfile

BUT, the file doesn't belong to you, so you don't have permission to do
anything to it, including changing the ownership from bruce to you, and
until you do, you can't write to that file because only bruce has write
permission.

Enter the super user, again. You can't log in as root, as a security
precaution, but you can *masquerade* as root, *if* you're in the sudoers
group (that keeps bad guys from logging in and messing with your files).
Since root can do anything to any file, using sudo you can correct the
ownership error.

stew


--
kubuntu-users mailing list
kubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/kubuntu-users
 
Old 01-05-2008, 04:10 AM
Clark
 
Default Dolphin Can't save Bookmarks?

Thanks Andrew and Stew,



this really helps sort some misconceptions right at the start.



Clark.



Stew Schneider wrote:

Andrew Jarrett wrote:


On Jan 4, 2008 7:04 PM, Clark <cpmcc@optusnet.com.au> wrote:



Whatever the niceties of the options above, all way above my head, by
inserting a literal copy including spaces and Capitals, Dolphin no longer
does peculiar things on shut down. Is Sudo the Linux command language and
if so where do I access the hand book?

Thanks Terence and Nils,

Clark.




Andrew has done a smashing job of explaining this, but it occurred to me
that there may be one piece of it that is still puzzling to you, if you
are coming from the Windows world.

One of the reasons Linux is more secure than Windows is the idea of
"permissions". A permission (as applied to a file) means just that --
what a particular user can do with a particular file. In Windows, you're
constantly running as superuser (Computer Administrator) unless you
specifically don't (Limited User). That means you can do as my father
did with the first computer I gave him -- delete all those files that he
didn't know what they were. In his case, that would have been the
operating system.

In a *nix system, those files belong to a user called root, and only
that user can write or change them, because the permissions are set up
that way.

Let's say you had a system file and you looked at it with the command ls
-l, which is like dir in the command window of a Windows box. You'd see
something like:

-rwx------ 1 root root 9248 2007-03-03 22:37 important.fl

The file is owned by the user root, and belongs to the group root. It
was created 03/03/2007 at 22:37 and is named important.fl

Now, in a Windows system, running as a computer administrator, you could
do anything you wanted to this file, even delete it. In Linux, only the
owner could do anything with this file, because of the way the
permissions are set.
-rwx --- ---

I divided the permissions up into three sections for clarity. The first
section, rwx, means that the owner (root) can read, write or execute the
file. The next group of three, ---, are the group permissions. A member
of the root group who *isn't* root can do nothing with the file. The
last three are similarly the permissions for everybody else, and they
can't do anything with it, either.

By carefully setting the permissions and ownership of files (and
commands are files, too), you can control who can do what to which file.

Pulling it together, something in your Dolphin installation made the
file belong to somebody other than you. So, you need to change the
ownership to fix it. Let's say the file (sitting in your ,kde folder)
was called myfile. ls -l might show:

-rwxr-xr-x bruce bruce 9248 2007-03-03 22:37 myfile

For it to operate properly, assume it needs to be:

-rwxr-xr-x clark clark 9248 2007-03-03 22:37 myfile

BUT, the file doesn't belong to you, so you don't have permission to do
anything to it, including changing the ownership from bruce to you, and
until you do, you can't write to that file because only bruce has write
permission.

Enter the super user, again. You can't log in as root, as a security
precaution, but you can *masquerade* as root, *if* you're in the sudoers
group (that keeps bad guys from logging in and messing with your files).
Since root can do anything to any file, using sudo you can correct the
ownership error.

stew








--
kubuntu-users mailing list
kubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/kubuntu-users
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 08:54 AM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org