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Old 03-11-2009, 07:42 PM
Brian Norman Wootton
 
Default what is the difference between swap partition and swap

>
> I am not sure whether I should enlarge the /swap partition or make a
> > swap file as a virtural swap partition.
>

It shouldn't matter for performance, but I would be tempted to say
enlarge the partition (though this may involve some backing up and
restoring), simply because reinstalls will be easier in the future.

Matt Flaschen

There used to be a maximum partition size for swap of 2 GB, I don't know if this still applies.
I used to add a swap file if I couldn't find a lump of free disc big enough for
required swap size wanted.
brian


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Old 03-12-2009, 02:15 PM
Derek Broughton
 
Default what is the difference between swap partition and swap

Brian Norman Wootton wrote:

> There used to be a maximum partition size for swap of 2 GB, I don't know
> if this still applies.

Never in my memory (I started using at least 3GB when I bought my Dell
laptop at least 5 years ago, because I was using swap for tmpfs).
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Old 03-12-2009, 06:33 PM
Jonas Norlander
 
Default what is the difference between swap partition and swap

2009/3/12 Derek Broughton <derek@pointerstop.ca>:
> Brian Norman Wootton wrote:
>
>> There used to be a maximum partition size for swap of 2 GB, I don't know
>> if this still applies.
>
> Never in my memory (I started using at least 3GB when I bought my Dell
> laptop at least 5 years ago, because I was using swap for tmpfs).
> --
> derek
>

Well there are a limit of 4 Gb (if you use 32 bit architectures) for
your virtual memory and that includes RAM, Swap, Graphics memory and
other devices. Although there are work around for access more. Would
be interesting to see what would happen if you allocated more then 4
Gb in 32 bit machine with 1 Gb RAM and big enough swap?

/ Jonas

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Old 03-12-2009, 11:15 PM
Derek Broughton
 
Default what is the difference between swap partition and swap

Jonas Norlander wrote:

> 2009/3/12 Derek Broughton <derek@pointerstop.ca>:
>> Brian Norman Wootton wrote:
>>
>>> There used to be a maximum partition size for swap of 2 GB, I don't know
>>> if this still applies.
>>
>> Never in my memory (I started using at least 3GB when I bought my Dell
>> laptop at least 5 years ago, because I was using swap for tmpfs).
>
> Well there are a limit of 4 Gb (if you use 32 bit architectures) for
> your virtual memory and that includes RAM, Swap, Graphics memory and
> other devices.

Surely that's not right. People are using 4GB _real_ memory (using PAE
kernels) - do they not get any swap at all? I really am going to have to
finish the installation on this machine...
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Old 03-13-2009, 12:47 AM
Steven Vollom
 
Default what is the difference between swap partition and swap

Derek Broughton wrote:
> Jonas Norlander wrote:
>
>
>> 2009/3/12 Derek Broughton <derek@pointerstop.ca>:
>>
>>> Brian Norman Wootton wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>> There used to be a maximum partition size for swap of 2 GB, I don't know
>>>> if this still applies.
>>>>
>>> Never in my memory (I started using at least 3GB when I bought my Dell
>>> laptop at least 5 years ago, because I was using swap for tmpfs).
>>>
>> Well there are a limit of 4 Gb (if you use 32 bit architectures) for
>> your virtual memory and that includes RAM, Swap, Graphics memory and
>> other devices.
>>
>
> Surely that's not right. People are using 4GB _real_ memory (using PAE
> kernels) - do they not get any swap at all? I really am going to have to
> finish the installation on this machine...
>
I don't know if you want to hear this, but I just built my new computer
a 64bit machine. I have a fairly large HDD and Lots of memory Plus a
quad-core now. When I set up my new system, I installed Intrepie 64bit
with KDE 4.2. Not knowing it wasn't possible, I made a 50gb boot
partition and a 20gb swap partition and so far it is working pretty
good. So if you have a newer OS, you may be able to have more swap. I
didn't know there were limitations when I did it. I have 8gb memory
installed.

Steven

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Old 03-13-2009, 11:21 AM
Jonas Norlander
 
Default what is the difference between swap partition and swap

2009/3/13 Derek Broughton <derek@pointerstop.ca>:
> Jonas Norlander wrote:
>
>> 2009/3/12 Derek Broughton <derek@pointerstop.ca>:
>>> Brian Norman Wootton wrote:
>>>
>>>> There used to be a maximum partition size for swap of 2 GB, I don't know
>>>> if this still applies.
>>>
>>> Never in my memory (I started using at least 3GB when I bought my Dell
>>> laptop at least 5 years ago, because I was using swap for tmpfs).
>>
>> Well there are a limit of 4 Gb (if you use 32 bit architectures) for
>> your virtual memory and that includes RAM, Swap, Graphics memory and
>> other devices.
>
> Surely that's not right. *People are using 4GB _real_ memory (using PAE
> kernels) - do they not get any swap at all?

Processors from Pentium Pro and above have PAE and that gives you a
limit of 64 GiB of Virtual Memory so probably all modern CPU and OS
can have large swap space.
I was mixing things up, was think more of how much memory a process
could access and was not really follow the OT.

PAE is one way to access more memory where the physical address size
is increased from 32 bits to 36 bits giving you a total of 64 GiB but
you still got a limit of 4 GiB Virtual address space per process. But
there are ways that the OS can handle that.
<snip from wikipedia>
For application software which needs access to more than 4 GB of RAM,
some special mechanism may be provided by the operating system in
addition to the regular PAE support. On Microsoft Windows this
mechanism is called Address Windowing Extensions, while on Unix-like
systems a variety of techniques are used, such as using mmap() to map
regions of a file into and out of the address space as needed.
<snip>


/ Jonas

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Old 03-13-2009, 11:27 AM
Joel Oliver
 
Default what is the difference between swap partition and swap

Steven Vollom wrote:
>
> I don't know if you want to hear this, but I just built my new computer
> a 64bit machine. I have a fairly large HDD and Lots of memory Plus a
> quad-core now. When I set up my new system, I installed Intrepie 64bit
> with KDE 4.2. Not knowing it wasn't possible, I made a 50gb boot
> partition and a 20gb swap partition and so far it is working pretty
> good. So if you have a newer OS, you may be able to have more swap. I
> didn't know there were limitations when I did it. I have 8gb memory
> installed.
>
> Steven
>
>


20GB Swap? That's alot of wasted space. If this is a desktop system and
you have no intention on hibernating it with 300 various apps opened at
the same time, 2Gb would be enough. 8Gb max. My bet would be your
system would "never" ever swap anyway with 8GB RAM.

And I assume you mean a 50Gb "root" partition. If setting up a separate
boot partition (which isn't necessary) You only need a very small amount
of space as the boot partition only holds grub settings and your
kernels/initrd images.

Joel.




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Old 03-13-2009, 12:39 PM
Derek Broughton
 
Default what is the difference between swap partition and swap

Jonas Norlander wrote:

> PAE is one way to access more memory where the physical address size
> is increased from 32 bits to 36 bits giving you a total of 64 GiB but
> you still got a limit of 4 GiB Virtual address space per process.

LOL. I've got 4GiB of real memory - 4GiB per process is just fine for me!
If you really can't live with a 4GiB process limit you probably should be
using a 64-bit system :-)

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Old 03-13-2009, 01:07 PM
Ignazio Palmisano
 
Default what is the difference between swap partition and swap

Steven Vollom wrote:
> Derek Broughton wrote:
>> Jonas Norlander wrote:
>>
>>
>>> 2009/3/12 Derek Broughton <derek@pointerstop.ca>:
>>>
>>>> Brian Norman Wootton wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> There used to be a maximum partition size for swap of 2 GB, I don't know
>>>>> if this still applies.
>>>>>
>>>> Never in my memory (I started using at least 3GB when I bought my Dell
>>>> laptop at least 5 years ago, because I was using swap for tmpfs).
>>>>
>>> Well there are a limit of 4 Gb (if you use 32 bit architectures) for
>>> your virtual memory and that includes RAM, Swap, Graphics memory and
>>> other devices.
>>>
>> Surely that's not right. People are using 4GB _real_ memory (using PAE
>> kernels) - do they not get any swap at all? I really am going to have to
>> finish the installation on this machine...
>>
> I don't know if you want to hear this, but I just built my new computer
> a 64bit machine. I have a fairly large HDD and Lots of memory Plus a
> quad-core now. When I set up my new system, I installed Intrepie 64bit
> with KDE 4.2. Not knowing it wasn't possible, I made a 50gb boot
> partition and a 20gb swap partition and so far it is working pretty
> good.


50 gigs of boot partition or of root partition? If it's just for the
boot (I believe there are only the kernel images + some grub stuff &
similar), I believe 1 gig is more than enough for the foreseeable future

I.

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