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Old 12-27-2010, 03:05 AM
Bill Stanley
 
Default Network problems

On 12/26/2010 06:48 PM, Lucio M Nicolosi wrote:
> On 12/26/2010 07:15 PM, Bill Stanley wrote:
>
>>
>> The ping problem:
>> When I use computer two to ping computer one I get some strange results.
>> If I specify computer one using its ip address (192.168.1.100) I fet a
>> ping back with an average time of 0.27 ms. If I specify the computers
>> name (aragorn), sending a ping yields a time of 35.66 ms, It's
>> suprising that it would be this much slower. Maybe if I specify the
>> name, it is actually pinging some other computer (computer one has a
>> common name). Sending a ping from computer one to computer two yields
>> nothing both for the ip-address (192.168.1.101) and the computers name.
>>
>> The file sharing:
>> I can't get a usable connection, On looking at the /etc/samba log files
>> I can see that there is some indication that a connection was attempted
>> but the attempt failed. On both computers, the documents folder is
>> shared but the shares-admin program allows only sharing via Unix-nfsm,
>> there ore no other choices even though there should samba listed (I
>> think). Frankly, I don't think shares-admin is very good.
>>
>>
>> Using the Places/network desktop menu item on computer one the following
>> are the results.
>> 1. When I attempt to open a Windows network connection (NFS unix is not
>> one of the choices)
>> 2. When I open the windows network icon, I see nothing. This is
>> interesting because yesterday, I could see the name of my home network.
>> In this respect, I have taken a step backwards, I used to get an error
>> message saying that the shares list was not sent. The same situation is
>> seen when I try to use computer rwo to connect to computer one.
>>
>> I hesitate to add the ancient (12 years old) computer to the mix. Both
>> computers dual boot and I can boot on computer one to Windows 7,
>> Open-Suse or Unbuntu, I almost exclusively use Unbuntu and I keep Win7
>> around just because it came pre-installed with it. Computer two can
>> boot to Windows XP (Service pack 2) or Unbuntu. I might try to
>> establish a network connection when computer two is booted to Win-XP.
>> If I can get a connection,I can at least rule out hardware problems.
>>
>
> What does it happen when you ping an external address with computer 2,
> both IP and Hostname, say www."someplace".com
> (http://www.hcidata.info/host2ip.cgi may help you to do this)? Would you
> observe the same latency discrepancies?
>
> Why hesitate? It would be nice to check the behavior of this "ancient"
> computer regarding pings.
>
> Wouldn't you have a spare lan board to test with the faulty PC?


It is interesting that you mention that! Using computer two (the one
that doesn't respond to a ping) I can get a response to a ping from
computer one when I use the ip number (By the way, I am aware of the
fact that its ip number, 192.168.1.100, is an internal ip number only).
Now when I tried pinging using its host-name I got an external
computer. Where this computer is I do not know but from its ip number
is external to my home network. I could have to come up with unique
host-names but I don't want to complicate matters more than they now are.

I also booted computer two to Windowx XP. I can ping both ways when
booted to Windows but I am still unable to establish a network
connection. This proves that the ping problem is not hardware related.
Maybe I can't ping using the host-name is because I am not running
host-name server software? I doubt it and for security reasons, I would
prefer that my computer host-names not be known outside of my home
network. (That is why I refer to them as computers one and two.)

I think I might have to try the ancient computer... It can dual boot
Windows 2000 or Suse Linux. As for the Lan board, I do not have one of
those. I might mention that I can run WireShark (a network snoop) but
am not experienced enough with it to make too much sense of the output.
I can make sense of some of the output however. If anyone out there
knows how to use it properly in this context, I would appreciate any
advice on its use. I think that it might prove useful particularly if
the third (ancient) computer is running it to look at the communication
attempts between computers one and two.

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Old 12-27-2010, 05:18 AM
Lucio M Nicolosi
 
Default Network problems

On 12/27/2010 02:05 AM, Bill Stanley wrote:

>
>
> It is interesting that you mention that! Using computer two (the one
> that doesn't respond to a ping) I can get a response to a ping from
> computer one when I use the ip number (By the way, I am aware of the
> fact that its ip number, 192.168.1.100, is an internal ip number only).
> Now when I tried pinging using its host-name I got an external
> computer. Where this computer is I do not know but from its ip number
> is external to my home network. I could have to come up with unique
> host-names but I don't want to complicate matters more than they now are.
>
> I also booted computer two to Windowx XP. I can ping both ways when
> booted to Windows but I am still unable to establish a network
> connection. This proves that the ping problem is not hardware related.
> Maybe I can't ping using the host-name is because I am not running
> host-name server software? I doubt it and for security reasons, I would
> prefer that my computer host-names not be known outside of my home
> network. (That is why I refer to them as computers one and two.)
>
> I think I might have to try the ancient computer... It can dual boot
> Windows 2000 or Suse Linux. As for the Lan board, I do not have one of
> those. I might mention that I can run WireShark (a network snoop) but
> am not experienced enough with it to make too much sense of the output.
> I can make sense of some of the output however. If anyone out there
> knows how to use it properly in this context, I would appreciate any
> advice on its use. I think that it might prove useful particularly if
> the third (ancient) computer is running it to look at the communication
> attempts between computers one and two.
>


Your DNS server is routing your traffic to an external domain when you
ping this hostname. Perhaps you should change its name.

You should update the /etc/hosts files, IP and hostname, on each
computer in your LAN. In Windows, look for the file "hosts".

I believe that unless you can fix this ping problem, any attempt to
configure file sharing may turn out to be futile, (however...)

Have you tried to ssh across these workstations? You will need to "sudo
aptitude install ssh" on each one and check if the port number 22 on the
receiving end is open (or the firewall is off), and then run, for
instance, "ssh 192.168.1.100" from the terminal. If successful, it will
mean that whatever the ping problem origin is, communication is feasible
(but I would be very surprised if it works).


--
L M Nicolosi, Eng.
Linux Regist. User #481505 - http://counter.li.org/

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Old 12-27-2010, 07:09 AM
Colin Law
 
Default Network problems

On 27 December 2010 04:05, Bill Stanley <bstanle@wowway.com> wrote:
>
> Using computer two (the one
> that doesn't respond to a ping) I can get a response to a ping from
> computer one when I use the ip number (By the way, I am aware of the
> fact that its ip number, 192.168.1.100, is an internal ip number only).
> *Now when I tried pinging using its host-name I got an external
> computer. *Where this computer is I do not know but from its ip number
> is external to my home network. *I could have to come up with unique
> host-names but I don't want to complicate matters more than they now are.

When accessing machines on the local network you can use
computername.local as the host name.

Colin

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Old 12-27-2010, 07:40 AM
Tom H
 
Default Network problems

On Mon, Dec 27, 2010 at 3:09 AM, Colin Law <clanlaw@googlemail.com> wrote:
>
> When accessing machines on the local network you can use
> computername.local as the host name.

If avahi-daemon's running.

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Old 12-27-2010, 08:41 AM
Colin Law
 
Default Network problems

On 27 December 2010 08:40, Tom H <tomh0665@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Mon, Dec 27, 2010 at 3:09 AM, Colin Law <clanlaw@googlemail.com> wrote:
>>
>> When accessing machines on the local network you can use
>> computername.local as the host name.
>
> If avahi-daemon's running.

True, which I think it is by default is it not?

Colin

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Old 12-27-2010, 08:44 AM
Tom H
 
Default Network problems

On Mon, Dec 27, 2010 at 4:41 AM, Colin Law <clanlaw@googlemail.com> wrote:
> On 27 December 2010 08:40, Tom H <tomh0665@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Mon, Dec 27, 2010 at 3:09 AM, Colin Law <clanlaw@googlemail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> When accessing machines on the local network you can use
>>> computername.local as the host name.
>>
>> If avahi-daemon's running.
>
> True, which I think it is by default is it not?

Yes. I meant to point that out too but pressed too quickly on "send".
Sorry. But some people purge it (like me)...

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Old 12-27-2010, 03:12 PM
"Boggess Rod"
 
Default Network problems

>On 12/23/2010 12:21 PM, Tom H wrote:
>> On Thu, Dec 23, 2010 at 3:45 AM, Lucio M
Nicolosi<lmnicolosi@gmail.com>
>wrote:
>>> On Wed, Dec 22, 2010 at 5:14 PM, Bill Stanley<bstanle@wowway.com>
>wrote:
>>>>
>>>> I'm not certain if I am running two firewalls. I assume I am
because I
>>>> know I installed the gufw firewall on the computer that doesn't
respond
>>>> to a ping. I assume that Unbuntu installs a firewall by default.
If
>>>> so what is its name because I don't see any evidence of it. This
is
>the
>>>> first firewall I assume I have. If there isn't one, then I have
gufw
>only.
>>>>
>>>> The strange thing is that I use the unaffected computer to do a
port
>>>> scan (using the system/administration/network tools) and can get
some
>>>> output back from the affected computer.
>>>>
>>>> The output of the port scan (from the unaffected computer) is...
>>>>
>>>> PORT STATE SERVICE
>>>> 111 open sunprc
>>>> 2049 open nfs
>>>> 40837 open unknown
>>>> 45314 open unknown
>>>> 50038 open unknown
>>>>
>>>> When I do a port scan from the affected computer (of its port
status i
>>>> get...
>>>>
>>>> Port State service
>>>> 111 open sunprc
>>>> 2049 open nfs
>>>> 40837 open unknown
>>>> 45314 open unknown
>>>> 50038 open unknown
>>>> 52826 open unknown
>>>>
>>>> I am somewhat concerned about the open ports with an unknown
service.
>>>> Is there any way to get more information about those services?
>>>>
>>>> I notice that the unaffected computer can see the nfs service
running
>on
>>>> the affected computer. If I can see the nfs service running, what
must
>>>> be done to share files using the nfs service.
>>>
>>> Although Ubuntu comes loaded with iptables, the core of any
firewall,
>>> if no rules are set it "doesn't work". Gufw is just a graphic
>>> interface to iptables that enables easy handling of rules. I don't
>>> have Gufw installed right now and I can't remember if it can disable
>>> ping requests, (anyway, yours is probably unconfigured) like some
DSL
>>> routers can do.
>>
>> For the sake of future googlers: it isn't that the firewall doesn't
>> work on a default Ubuntu install, it's that there are no rules
loaded;
>> gufw is a graphical front-end of ufw, which is itself a front-end
>> (with rule syntax similar to one of the BSDs) to iptables.
>>
>> So having both ufw and gufw doesn't mean that you have two firewalls
>> installed and if you don't enable ufw (through the CLI or GUI) or
>> write or load some rules with iptables you won't have a firewall
>> running.
>>
>> I don't see any samba ports in your output above. Are you sure that
>> you have samba running? How did you set up the shares?
>>
>> For nfs, you must have it installed. To export a directory, you have
>> to edit "/etc/exports".
>>
>
>I think you misunderstand my problem. If I understand samba correctly,
>it is for connection a windows machine to a Linux machine. I can't get
>two Linux machines (both running Unbuntu) to communicate. If I am
>right, samba is not needed but nfs is needed. After I get the two to
>communicate I will attempt to add my third computer which is a Windows
>machine. Of course to do that samba will be needed but for the moment
>it should not be needed.
>
>The problem might not be a firewall problem. Then again, I really
don't
>know which is why I am asking for help.
>
>
>

Rather draconic, but how bad would it be for you to reinstall on the
machine with the firewall and start over? There's just too much going on
here for anything more than random guesses. You might start off by
installing samba and getting that to work without the firewall. Once you
have ALL the machines, Linux AND Windows, communicating with the samba
shares, THEN start on the next single piece, say the firewall. That way,
if something stops working, you'll at least know what caused it. (It
sounds like the nfs is not needed, since samba can be used by both Linux
and Windows; since nfs will create some odd file locking that will cause
issues if you share the same files and directories on smb, let's try and
avoid that option unless we have no choice.)

Right now, you can't ping and we can't guess if that's because you have
SNMP Echo (also known as ping) blocked on port 7 (udp and tcp), because
the firewall (or two which you may or may not have running) have
disabled SNMP Echo replies, or because there's a network
mis-configuration. Even if we do figure out ping, doing so doesn't
necessarily imply that the problem is directly related to accessing
samba shares (on port 139 tcp).

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Old 12-27-2010, 03:33 PM
Bill Stanley
 
Default Network problems

On 12/27/2010 04:41 AM, Colin Law wrote:
> On 27 December 2010 08:40, Tom H<tomh0665@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Mon, Dec 27, 2010 at 3:09 AM, Colin Law<clanlaw@googlemail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> When accessing machines on the local network you can use
>>> computername.local as the host name.
>>
>> If avahi-daemon's running.
>
> True, which I think it is by default is it not?
>
> Colin
>

Well, I am back at it again. I am going to get the third (ancient)
computer into the act. This is going to entail some delay because I am
going to move the third computer into the same room as the other two
computers. (Previously it was located in the basement) When I looked at
the ancient computers Linux partition (Red Hat), I realized that it
Unwas unused for quite a while I think it best to install the latest
version of Unbuntu on it. I think I can run Unbuntu on it (I'll soon
find out) I'll get back with you folks as soon as I am finished.

By the way, it has been suggested that I do a reinstall on the affected
computer... I am getting to that point but not just yet. You see, I
learn the most when confronting a problem and I am certainly learning a
lot now. When my frustration reaches a certain point, I will reinstall.

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Old 12-27-2010, 03:44 PM
Colin Law
 
Default Network problems

On 27 December 2010 16:33, Bill Stanley <bstanle@wowway.com> wrote:
> ...
> By the way, it has been suggested that I do a reinstall on the affected
> computer... I am getting to that point but not just yet. *You see, I learn
> the most when confronting a problem and I am certainly learning a lot now.
> *When my frustration reaches a certain point, I will reinstall.
>

It might be interesting to boot off a live CD and try the ping test.

For samba did you check that smbfs is installed?

Colin

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Old 12-27-2010, 06:33 PM
"Boggess Rod"
 
Default Network problems

>By the way, it has been suggested that I do a reinstall on the affected
>computer... I am getting to that point but not just yet. You see, I
>learn the most when confronting a problem and I am certainly learning a
>lot now. When my frustration reaches a certain point, I will
reinstall.
>
Now that I'm caught up on the emails, a quick recap:

1) This is primarily a learning experience, as opposed to a production
setup that you have to have running no later than yesterday.

2) You have (at present) two computers running Linux.

3) Ping works for name and IP for one, but only IP for the other. For
the one that does work, IP by host name is more than a hundred times
slower and does not resolve to the correct, desired IP.

4) You have double-checked cabling, but not the router.

5) You're adding a third (windows) computer.

Is that about right? Or am I off on that third or fourth bit? Are you
using fixed IP or are you running DHCP in the router or one of these
machines? Can we assume that the firewall has no filtering enabled,
neither ports nor SNMP replies?

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