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Old 12-22-2008, 04:39 PM
Brian Norman Wootton
 
Default Terminal Commands

Check your machine with

lshw

a lot to read, do a lshw|more if will tell you all
up to the serial number of each components...

all without opening the case.


Re above:
I've forgotten at least half of the console linux commands in the
last 10 years since I retired, and there was a lot I didn't know
then, and there must be a lot more now! can anybody point me at a
reasonably complete list with one line function descriptions. Would
be very useful
ta muchly
brian


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Old 12-22-2008, 06:03 PM
Nils Kassube
 
Default Terminal Commands

Brian Norman Wootton wrote:
> I've forgotten at least half of the console linux commands in the
> last 10 years since I retired, and there was a lot I didn't know
> then, and there must be a lot more now! can anybody point me at a
> reasonably complete list with one line function descriptions. Would
> be very useful

Do it yourself:

for f in {,/usr}/{,s}bin/[0-9a-zA-Z]*;do n=${f##*/};whatis $n|
grep -e "^$n (1)" -e "^$n (8)";done|sort|uniq|less

This lists all commands found in /bin, /sbin, /usr/bin, /usr/sbin on your
machine. It may not be perfect and the builtin shell commands are not
listed.

Beware: Don't redirect it to your printer - that's several thousand lines
if you have many packages installed.


Nils

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Old 12-23-2008, 09:59 AM
Brian Norman Wootton
 
Default Terminal commands

Do it yourself:

for f in {,/usr}/{,s}bin/[0-9a-zA-Z]*;do n=${f##*/};whatis $n|
grep -e "^$n (1)" -e "^$n (8)";done|sort|uniq|less

This lists all commands found in /bin, /sbin, /usr/bin, /usr/sbin on your
machine. It may not be perfect and the builtin shell commands are not
listed.

Beware: Don't redirect it to your printer - that's several thousand lines
if you have many packages installed.






Thanks Nils

*** did you write that script* off the top of your head? got my brain
going working out

exactly what it was doing anyway. Shoved the output into a file for
future reference.

brian



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Old 12-23-2008, 11:26 AM
Nils Kassube
 
Default Terminal commands

Brian Norman Wootton wrote:
> did you write that script off the top of your head?

Not exactly

> got my brain going
> working out
> exactly what it was doing anyway.

OK, here is a description. I'm not sure which parts are bash specific:

Loop for a list of all commands in /bin /sbin /usr/bin /usr/sbin which
start with alphanumeric characters

for f in {,/usr}/{,s}bin/[0-9a-zA-Z]*;do

strip the directory from the command name

n=${f##*/};

Get the one line description of the command

whatis $n|

Select only manual sections 1 and 8

grep -e "^$n (1)" -e "^$n (8)";done|

get a sorted list without double entries and pipe the list through less
for readability

sort|uniq|less

BTW: I think such a list isn't very helpful. I prefer the apropos command
to search for a particular command.


Nils

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Old 12-23-2008, 05:54 PM
Brian Norman Wootton
 
Default Terminal commands

OK, here is a description. I'm not sure which parts are bash specific:
.
.
.
sort|uniq|less

Well, I sort of understand what it's doing, I guess.

BTW: I think such a list isn't very helpful. I prefer the apropos command
to search for a particular command.

I was using apropos to find 'du': going 'apropos disk' didn't do it,
'apropos disk usage' did find it, but of course, to do this one I had already
remembered the command anyway. This only an example, I've got plenty of guis
installed to do the disc info job more completely. A dolphin keyword search
on the file resulting from your script is nearly as quick as using apropos, whatis
or whatever, I find.
Thanks, Nils, have a Good Christmas
brian








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