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Old 12-01-2007, 05:26 AM
"Kevin O'Gorman"
 
Default Use of gethostname() and getdomainname()

I've got my own domain and domain server.* I've just run into a problem about the appropriate settings for hosts and domains, and it's messing up a few things in my postfix setup.

The gentoo instructions say to set /etc/conf.d/hostname to the host name only.* It gets passed to sethostname(2) unchanged by /etc/init.d/hostname.* I did it.

The gentoo instructions say to put a domain name, if needed, into /etc/conf.d/net.* It seems to get used in network setup.* I did it.

Nothing seems to be set into whatever it is that setdomainname(2) is used for.

My mailx mailer seems to put "localdomain" on the sender address when my crontab entries call it.* Maybe because it sees that getdomainname(2) comes up empty.

What's the right way to set this up?* Should I just cobble my proper domain into setdomainname(2)?* Is there a right way?* Is there a better way?

--
Kevin O'Gorman, PhD
 
Old 12-01-2007, 01:38 PM
Stroller
 
Default Use of gethostname() and getdomainname()

On 1 Dec 2007, at 06:26, Kevin O'Gorman wrote:


... my postfix setup.
...
My mailx mailer seems to put "localdomain" on the sender address
when my crontab entries call it. Maybe because it sees that
getdomainname(2) comes up empty.


Hi there,

I have encountered similar problems.

I don't use mailx, but just this instead:
for foo in `seq 10` ; do echo "Subject: test $foo of 10" | /usr/
sbin/sendmail stroller@bigfoot.com ; done


I was getting localdomain as part of the address, also, and
consequent mailbounce. I had to set "myhostname = " in /etc/postfix/
main.cf in order to overcome this, and find the necessity annoying.


What's the right way to set this up? Should I just cobble my
proper domain into setdomainname(2)? Is there a right way? Is
there a better way?


I see you don't have any other replies here, so I'd be grateful if
you could please keep us (well, me) posted if you experiment further
or look for advice elsewhere.


Stroller.

--
gentoo-user@gentoo.org mailing list
 
Old 12-01-2007, 04:21 PM
Etaoin Shrdlu
 
Default Use of gethostname() and getdomainname()

On Saturday 1 December 2007, Kevin O'Gorman wrote:

> I've got my own domain and domain server. I've just run into a
> problem about the appropriate settings for hosts and domains, and it's
> messing up a few things in my postfix setup.
>
> The gentoo instructions say to set /etc/conf.d/hostname to the host
> name only. It gets passed to sethostname(2) unchanged by
> /etc/init.d/hostname. I did it.
> The gentoo instructions say to put a domain name, if needed, into
> /etc/conf.d/net. It seems to get used in network setup. I did it.
>
> Nothing seems to be set into whatever it is that setdomainname(2) is
> used for.
> My mailx mailer seems to put "localdomain" on the sender address when
> my crontab entries call it. Maybe because it sees that
> getdomainname(2) comes up empty.
>
> What's the right way to set this up? Should I just cobble my proper
> domain into setdomainname(2)? Is there a right way? Is there a
> better way?

Try adding the following line to /etc/hosts:

a.b.c.d hostname.your.domain hostname

of course, replacing a.b.c.d with your correct ip address.

I don't know whether this is related to your problem, but it usually
solves the domainname: (none) problem.
--
gentoo-user@gentoo.org mailing list
 
Old 12-02-2007, 09:56 AM
Mick
 
Default Use of gethostname() and getdomainname()

On Saturday 01 December 2007, Etaoin Shrdlu wrote:
> On Saturday 1 December 2007, Kevin O'Gorman wrote:
> > I've got my own domain and domain server. I've just run into a
> > problem about the appropriate settings for hosts and domains, and it's
> > messing up a few things in my postfix setup.
> >
> > The gentoo instructions say to set /etc/conf.d/hostname to the host
> > name only. It gets passed to sethostname(2) unchanged by
> > /etc/init.d/hostname. I did it.
> > The gentoo instructions say to put a domain name, if needed, into
> > /etc/conf.d/net. It seems to get used in network setup. I did it.
> >
> > Nothing seems to be set into whatever it is that setdomainname(2) is
> > used for.
> > My mailx mailer seems to put "localdomain" on the sender address when
> > my crontab entries call it. Maybe because it sees that
> > getdomainname(2) comes up empty.
> >
> > What's the right way to set this up? Should I just cobble my proper
> > domain into setdomainname(2)? Is there a right way? Is there a
> > better way?
>
> Try adding the following line to /etc/hosts:
>
> a.b.c.d hostname.your.domain hostname
>
> of course, replacing a.b.c.d with your correct ip address.
>
> I don't know whether this is related to your problem, but it usually
> solves the domainname: (none) problem.

Is this meant to be the LAN private address, or the Internet address of the
host?

--
Regards,
Mick
 
Old 12-02-2007, 02:12 PM
Etaoin Shrdlu
 
Default Use of gethostname() and getdomainname()

On Sunday 2 December 2007, Mick wrote:

> > Try adding the following line to /etc/hosts:
> >
> > a.b.c.d hostname.your.domain hostname
> >
> > of course, replacing a.b.c.d with your correct ip address.
> >
> > I don't know whether this is related to your problem, but it usually
> > solves the domainname: (none) problem.
>
> Is this meant to be the LAN private address, or the Internet address
> of the host?

It depends. If you just need to solve the agetty banner problem which
prints "welcome to machinename.(none)", you can just use 127.0.0.1 or
eth0's address, and this always has solved all the problems for me until
now. Otherwise, you have to know what address the application uses to
identify the box. However, if in doubt, nothing stops you from adding
several lines that differ only in the ip address:

127.0.0.1 hostname.your.domain hostname
10.0.0.1 hostname.your.domain hostname
100.100.100.100 hostname.your.domain hostname

etc.

NOTE: I don't know whether this is the correct way to do things. Many
times it works, but other, less clumsy, ways probably exist (I simply
haven't had the need to search them until now).
--
gentoo-user@gentoo.org mailing list
 
Old 12-02-2007, 10:45 PM
"Kevin O'Gorman"
 
Default Use of gethostname() and getdomainname()

I like keeping it to stuff that makes sense.* I don't put in private network addresses unless I actually use them,
which would just be the 192.168.x.x addresses provided by my DSL router, behind which I hide most of my

systems.* But for the present thread, I'm talking about the routable IP number for this host: treat.kosmanor.com
is seen as 64.166.164.49
.

I've got HOSTNAME=treat in /etc/conf.d/hostname, and the FQDN in /etc/postfix/main.cf.

Meanwhile, I've stumbled on the Linux man page for uname(2).* It explains some of this as lack of coverage from the standards.* Use "man 2 uname" and look in the NOTES section.* It seems this is an area that has not been well treated, and there's divergence among systems as well as among applications, let alone between them.* Ugh.



On Dec 2, 2007 7:12 AM, Etaoin Shrdlu <shrdlu@unlimitedmail.org> wrote:

On Sunday 2 December 2007, Mick wrote:

> > Try adding the following line to /etc/hosts:
> >
> > a.b.c.d *hostname.your.domain *hostname

> > of course, replacing
a.b.c.d with your correct ip address.
> >
> > I don't know whether this is related to your problem, but it usually
> > solves the domainname: (none) problem.
>
> Is this meant to be the LAN private address, or the Internet address

> of the host?

It depends. If you just need to solve the agetty banner problem which
prints "welcome to machinename.(none)", you can just use 127.0.0.1
or
eth0's address, and this always has solved all the problems for me until
now. Otherwise, you have to know what address the application uses to
identify the box. However, if in doubt, nothing stops you from adding

several lines that differ only in the ip address:

127.0.0.1 hostname.your.domain *hostname
10.0.0.1 hostname.your.domain
*hostname
100.100.100.100 hostname.your.domain *hostname

etc.

NOTE: I don't know whether this is the correct way to do things. Many
times it works, but other, less clumsy, ways probably exist (I simply

haven't had the need to search them until now).
--
gentoo-user@gentoo.org mailing list




--
Kevin O'Gorman, PhD
 

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