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Old 05-05-2008, 04:52 AM
deface
 
Default using a HD with bad sectors

Iain Buchanan wrote:

Hi all,

I have two 2.5in HD's, one 60Gb with a heap of bad sectors currently
used in external Hd enclosure, and one 100Gb which seems in good
condition, currently in my laptop.

I'm upgrading my laptop, and I'd like to turn the old one into a myth
frontend or something similar, so I want to put the 60Gb in it. I will
then use the 100Gb in my external enclosure for travelling, backups,
etc.

The reason the 60Gb has bad sectors (I think) is because I dropped it
(in it's enclosure). This was quite some time ago, and it doesn't seem
to be dying any further, but I haven't done any comparisons on the bad
sector count. I use nearly 100% of the space available, and regularly
compare cksums, so if anything was deteriorating, I would know.

The question is: should I use it at all (for any use, external HD or
internal with operating system), or is it sufficient to let the fsck
tool mark the bad sectors and just keep using it?

Is there a way to monitor it's "health" in the external enclosure until
I get my new laptop? Is counting the bad sectors enough?

thanks heaps!

this day in age, space is sooo cheap. atleast in the US. 60 gigs is
weak. get a new drive.

--
gentoo-user@lists.gentoo.org mailing list
 
Old 05-05-2008, 07:10 AM
Volker Armin Hemmann
 
Default using a HD with bad sectors

On Montag, 5. Mai 2008, Iain Buchanan wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> I have two 2.5in HD's, one 60Gb with a heap of bad sectors currently
> used in external Hd enclosure, and one 100Gb which seems in good
> condition, currently in my laptop.
>
> I'm upgrading my laptop, and I'd like to turn the old one into a myth
> frontend or something similar, so I want to put the 60Gb in it. I will
> then use the 100Gb in my external enclosure for travelling, backups,
> etc.
>
> The reason the 60Gb has bad sectors (I think) is because I dropped it
> (in it's enclosure). This was quite some time ago, and it doesn't seem
> to be dying any further, but I haven't done any comparisons on the bad
> sector count. I use nearly 100% of the space available, and regularly
> compare cksums, so if anything was deteriorating, I would know.
>
> The question is: should I use it at all (for any use, external HD or
> internal with operating system), or is it sufficient to let the fsck
> tool mark the bad sectors and just keep using it?

badblocks & mkfs.

Maybe.

And the 'monitoring tool' would be smartmontools.

But I wouldn't trust a harddisk that got damaged in a drop.
--
gentoo-user@lists.gentoo.org mailing list
 
Old 05-05-2008, 08:46 AM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default using a HD with bad sectors

On Mon, 5 May 2008 09:10:54 +0200, Volker Armin Hemmann wrote:

> > The question is: should I use it at all (for any use, external HD or
> > internal with operating system), or is it sufficient to let the fsck
> > tool mark the bad sectors and just keep using it?
>
> badblocks & mkfs.
>
> Maybe.
>
> And the 'monitoring tool' would be smartmontools.
>
> But I wouldn't trust a harddisk that got damaged in a drop.

On the other hand, if it's only being used as a MythTV front end, it
will only contain the OS and software, no data. So a single backup would
suffice (MythTV stores configuration data on the backend) and the only
harm in the drive failing would be that you wouldn't be able to use it
until you bought a new one and restored the backup. It depends on how
long you can last without TV

Then again, you could dispense with the hard drive altogether and PXE
boot the laptop.


--
Neil Bothwick

Politicians are like nappies
Both should be changed regularly, and for the same reason
 
Old 05-05-2008, 12:22 PM
Stroller
 
Default using a HD with bad sectors

On 5 May 2008, at 04:14, Iain Buchanan wrote:

...
The question is: should I use it at all (for any use, external HD or
internal with operating system), or is it sufficient to let the fsck
tool mark the bad sectors and just keep using it?
...


Here the cheapest 2.5" harddrive I can buy is 26.05 + VAT, and it's
a 5400rpm Maxtor 80gig drive.


For my money it's not worth using a flakey drive.

I use nearly 100% of the space available, and regularly compare
cksums, so if anything was deteriorating, I would know.



If you're confident in that assessment then you'll be fine with the
old drive, but if you have to ask, then maybe I'd just replace it.


Stroller.
--
gentoo-user@lists.gentoo.org mailing list
 
Old 05-05-2008, 04:43 PM
Florian Philipp
 
Default using a HD with bad sectors

On Mon, 2008-05-05 at 11:14 +0800, Iain Buchanan wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> I have two 2.5in HD's, one 60Gb with a heap of bad sectors currently
> used in external Hd enclosure, and one 100Gb which seems in good
> condition, currently in my laptop.
>
> I'm upgrading my laptop, and I'd like to turn the old one into a myth
> frontend or something similar, so I want to put the 60Gb in it. I will
> then use the 100Gb in my external enclosure for travelling, backups,
> etc.
>
> The reason the 60Gb has bad sectors (I think) is because I dropped it
> (in it's enclosure). This was quite some time ago, and it doesn't seem
> to be dying any further, but I haven't done any comparisons on the bad
> sector count. I use nearly 100% of the space available, and regularly
> compare cksums, so if anything was deteriorating, I would know.
>
> The question is: should I use it at all (for any use, external HD or
> internal with operating system), or is it sufficient to let the fsck
> tool mark the bad sectors and just keep using it?
>
> Is there a way to monitor it's "health" in the external enclosure until
> I get my new laptop? Is counting the bad sectors enough?
>

As I understand it, hard disks usually hide bad blocks from the OS as
long as they can utilize spare blocks. That means that there might be a
lot more bad blocks than you are aware of.

Last week I had my own notebook hard disk (60Gig as well) dying on me:
Bad blocks on a single partition, strange noises from time to time and
the S.M.A.R.T offline self test aborting with "read error" before it
even started.
I found smartmontools (or anything that's just polling SMART)
inappropriate. They still reported "all is well" although the self tests
failed (and were logged as failed) and an overheating occurrence was
logged (half a year ago the disk reached 53C during normal operation
for no apparent reason). Bad blocks were not registered at all!
 

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