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Old 10-12-2012, 09:20 PM
Francisco Ares
 
Default (sort of) strange things after upgrading the kernel

Hi, All

I have upgraded the kernel to gentoo-sources 3.4.9 and, for instance, k3b to 2.0.2, and it says there is no optical devices. But "cdrecord --scanbus" shows them all (a IDE dvd reader and a SATA dvd writer).




Most probably I have missed something, because I like to do some customizations to the kernel configuration, but all SATA hard disks are working, flash drives, and all the rest of the hardware goes ok.

I did not try to burn any DVD, but the players do OK with any of the devices, so it is not a permission problem (I still have to correct this, to make it persistent, but the k3b problem remains). It might be related to some other thing, the desktop widget that used to show all the disks' partitions, does not show anything any more, although "df" shows everything just as expected.




Funny, isn't it?

Any ideas, please?

Thanks
Francisco

P.S.: attached follows the ".config" for this kernel




--
"If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples then you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and I have one idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas." - George Bernard Shaw
 
Old 10-12-2012, 09:56 PM
Dale
 
Default (sort of) strange things after upgrading the kernel

Francisco Ares wrote:
> Hi, All
>
> I have upgraded the kernel to gentoo-sources 3.4.9 and, for instance,
> k3b to 2.0.2, and it says there is no optical devices. But "cdrecord
> --scanbus" shows them all (a IDE dvd reader and a SATA dvd writer).
>
> Most probably I have missed something, because I like to do some
> customizations to the kernel configuration, but all SATA hard disks
> are working, flash drives, and all the rest of the hardware goes ok.
>
> I did not try to burn any DVD, but the players do OK with any of the
> devices, so it is not a permission problem (I still have to correct
> this, to make it persistent, but the k3b problem remains). It might be
> related to some other thing, the desktop widget that used to show all
> the disks' partitions, does not show anything any more, although "df"
> shows everything just as expected.
>
> Funny, isn't it?
>
> Any ideas, please?
>
> Thanks
> Francisco
>
> P.S.: attached follows the ".config" for this kernel
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> "If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples then
> you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and
> I have one idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have
> two ideas." - George Bernard Shaw


Have you went back to the old kernel to test it again? If it does the
same with the old kernel, it's likely not the kernel. If it works like
it used to then it is the kernel.

That said, it is weird and I have ran into this sort of thing in the
past. Something works fine then breaks or acts weird with a newer
kernel. Usually I just stick with the old kernel until a couple
releases goes by and then try again. They fix stuff pretty fast.

Dale

:-) :-)

--
I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!
 
Old 10-13-2012, 01:50 AM
Francisco Ares
 
Default (sort of) strange things after upgrading the kernel

2012/10/12 Dale <rdalek1967@gmail.com>


Francisco Ares wrote:

> Hi, All

>

> I have upgraded the kernel to gentoo-sources 3.4.9 and, for instance,

> k3b to 2.0.2, and it says there is no optical devices. But "cdrecord

> --scanbus" shows them all (a IDE dvd reader and a SATA dvd writer).

>

> Most probably I have missed something, because I like to do some

> customizations to the kernel configuration, but all SATA hard disks

> are working, flash drives, and all the rest of the hardware goes ok.

>

> I did not try to burn any DVD, but the players do OK with any of the

> devices, so it is not a permission problem (I still have to correct

> this, to make it persistent, but the k3b problem remains). It might be

> related to some other thing, the desktop widget that used to show all

> the disks' partitions, does not show anything any more, although "df"

> shows everything just as expected.

>

> Funny, isn't it?

>

> Any ideas, please?

>

> Thanks

> Francisco

>

> P.S.: attached follows the ".config" for this kernel

>

>

>

>

>

> --

> "If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples then

> you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and

> I have one idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have

> two ideas." - George Bernard Shaw





Have you went back to the old kernel to test it again? *If it does the

same with the old kernel, it's likely not the kernel. *If it works like

it used to then it is the kernel.



That said, it is weird and I have ran into this sort of thing in the

past. *Something works fine then breaks or acts weird with a newer

kernel. *Usually I just stick with the old kernel until a couple

releases goes by and then try again. *They fix stuff pretty fast.



Dale



:-) *:-)



--

I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!







Thanks for your reply, Dale.

Yes, everything works as expected when using the old kernel.

I decided to re-emerge some base libraries, and nothing worked, until I remembered to re-emerge udev. After the build, it announced two wrong lines in the new kernel "config" file:



CONFIG_SYSFS_DEPRECATED=y
CONFIG_SYSFS_DEPRECATED_V2=y

After correcting them and building the kernel again, now everything is back to normal.

Thanks again
Francisco

--
"If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples then you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and I have one idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas." - George Bernard Shaw
 
Old 10-13-2012, 02:22 AM
Dale
 
Default (sort of) strange things after upgrading the kernel

Francisco Ares wrote:
>
>
> Thanks for your reply, Dale.
>
> Yes, everything works as expected when using the old kernel.
>
> I decided to re-emerge some base libraries, and nothing worked, until
> I remembered to re-emerge udev. After the build, it announced two
> wrong lines in the new kernel "config" file:
>
> CONFIG_SYSFS_DEPRECATED=y
> CONFIG_SYSFS_DEPRECATED_V2=y
>
> After correcting them and building the kernel again, now everything is
> back to normal.
>
> Thanks again
> Francisco
>
>
> --
> "If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples then
> you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and
> I have one idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have
> two ideas." - George Bernard Shaw


Do you use oldconfig or build each one from scratch? I use oldconfig so
that I at least have what I know works. It's just a matter of if I need
anything new enabled. Some claim oldconfig shouldn't be used but I have
only had it to fail once in the last 10 years or so. Most everyone I
know of uses oldconfig.

Glad you got it going tho.

Dale

:-) :-)

--
I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!
 
Old 10-13-2012, 02:42 AM
Francisco Ares
 
Default (sort of) strange things after upgrading the kernel

2012/10/12 Dale <rdalek1967@gmail.com>


Francisco Ares wrote:

>

>

> Thanks for your reply, Dale.

>

> Yes, everything works as expected when using the old kernel.

>

> I decided to re-emerge some base libraries, and nothing worked, until

> I remembered to re-emerge udev. After the build, it announced two

> wrong lines in the new kernel "config" file:

>

> CONFIG_SYSFS_DEPRECATED=y

> CONFIG_SYSFS_DEPRECATED_V2=y

>

> After correcting them and building the kernel again, now everything is

> back to normal.

>

> Thanks again

> Francisco

>

>

> --

> "If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples then

> you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and

> I have one idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have

> two ideas." - George Bernard Shaw





Do you use oldconfig or build each one from scratch? *I use oldconfig so

that I at least have what I know works. *It's just a matter of if I need

anything new enabled. *Some claim oldconfig shouldn't be used but I have

only had it to fail once in the last 10 years or so. *Most everyone I

know of uses oldconfig.



Glad you got it going tho.



Dale



:-) *:-)



--

I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!







I normally also use oldconfig. I think there might be a reason for it to be around. But this time I didn't, because the old kernel was version 2.6.39 and I thought oldconfig would mess things up more than help on the new 3.4.9. Don't know how right or wrong is this assumption, though.



I just was lazy to upgrade the kernel, as it takes an hour or so to check most of menucofig.

Francisco
 
Old 10-13-2012, 03:13 AM
Dale
 
Default (sort of) strange things after upgrading the kernel

Francisco Ares wrote:




2012/10/12 Dale <rdalek1967@gmail.com>


Francisco Ares wrote:

>

>

> Thanks for your reply, Dale.

>

> Yes, everything works as expected when using the old
kernel.

>

> I decided to re-emerge some base libraries, and nothing
worked, until

> I remembered to re-emerge udev. After the build, it
announced two

> wrong lines in the new kernel "config" file:

>

> CONFIG_SYSFS_DEPRECATED=y

> CONFIG_SYSFS_DEPRECATED_V2=y

>

> After correcting them and building the kernel again,
now everything is

> back to normal.

>

> Thanks again

> Francisco

>

>

> --

> "If you have an apple and I have an apple and we
exchange apples then

> you and I will still each have one apple. But if you
have an idea and

> I have one idea and we exchange these ideas, then each
of us will have

> two ideas." - George Bernard Shaw






Do you use oldconfig or build each one from scratch? *I use
oldconfig so

that I at least have what I know works. *It's just a matter of
if I need

anything new enabled. *Some claim oldconfig shouldn't be used
but I have

only had it to fail once in the last 10 years or so. *Most
everyone I

know of uses oldconfig.



Glad you got it going tho.




Dale



:-) *:-)



--

I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you
understood or how you interpreted my words!













I normally also use oldconfig. I think there might be a reason for
it to be around. But this time I didn't, because the old kernel
was version 2.6.39 and I thought oldconfig would mess things up
more than help on the new 3.4.9. Don't know how right or wrong is
this assumption, though.



I just was lazy to upgrade the kernel, as it takes an hour or so
to check most of menucofig.



Francisco






I would have tried it but that is a LOT of updates.* It may be
faster to start from scratch in that case.* I know a few years ago
there was some changes that kept oldconfig from working as it
should.* That was the only time it failed me but I do upgrade more
often to avoid this sort of thing.* I try to upgrade every couple
months.* Now if I have long uptimes, I may not actually ever use
that kernel but I have a config file to copy over that is a bit more
up to date.*



I would suggest printing or something the output of the following:*
lspci -k* That tells you what you need for your hardware, that is of
course from a kernel where all your hardware works.* There may be
some specific things for certain software that is needed but at
least you can boot up and have a system to work with.* I usually
leave the rest to defaults unless I am sure there is something I
don't need.*



Glad you got it sorted out and working tho.*



Dale



:-)* :-)*

--
I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!
 
Old 10-14-2012, 01:36 PM
Francisco Ares
 
Default (sort of) strange things after upgrading the kernel

2012/10/13 Dale <rdalek1967@gmail.com>







Francisco Ares wrote:




2012/10/12 Dale <rdalek1967@gmail.com>


Francisco Ares wrote:

>

>

> Thanks for your reply, Dale.

>

> Yes, everything works as expected when using the old
kernel.

>

> I decided to re-emerge some base libraries, and nothing
worked, until

> I remembered to re-emerge udev. After the build, it
announced two

> wrong lines in the new kernel "config" file:

>

> CONFIG_SYSFS_DEPRECATED=y

> CONFIG_SYSFS_DEPRECATED_V2=y

>

> After correcting them and building the kernel again,
now everything is

> back to normal.

>

> Thanks again

> Francisco

>

>

> --

> "If you have an apple and I have an apple and we
exchange apples then

> you and I will still each have one apple. But if you
have an idea and

> I have one idea and we exchange these ideas, then each
of us will have

> two ideas." - George Bernard Shaw






Do you use oldconfig or build each one from scratch? *I use
oldconfig so

that I at least have what I know works. *It's just a matter of
if I need

anything new enabled. *Some claim oldconfig shouldn't be used
but I have

only had it to fail once in the last 10 years or so. *Most
everyone I

know of uses oldconfig.



Glad you got it going tho.




Dale



:-) *:-)



--

I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you
understood or how you interpreted my words!













I normally also use oldconfig. I think there might be a reason for
it to be around. But this time I didn't, because the old kernel
was version 2.6.39 and I thought oldconfig would mess things up
more than help on the new 3.4.9. Don't know how right or wrong is
this assumption, though.



I just was lazy to upgrade the kernel, as it takes an hour or so
to check most of menucofig.



Francisco






I would have tried it but that is a LOT of updates.* It may be
faster to start from scratch in that case.* I know a few years ago
there was some changes that kept oldconfig from working as it
should.* That was the only time it failed me but I do upgrade more
often to avoid this sort of thing.* I try to upgrade every couple
months.* Now if I have long uptimes, I may not actually ever use
that kernel but I have a config file to copy over that is a bit more
up to date.*



I would suggest printing or something the output of the following:*
lspci -k* That tells you what you need for your hardware, that is of
course from a kernel where all your hardware works.* There may be
some specific things for certain software that is needed but at
least you can boot up and have a system to work with.* I usually
leave the rest to defaults unless I am sure there is something I
don't need.*



Glad you got it sorted out and working tho.*



Dale



:-)* :-)*

--
I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!




Hi, Dale



As my old kernel is from the 2.6 series and the new is from the 3.4, I
decided to do a "menuconfig" from scratch. I do use "lspci" and also I
always build the kernel allowing "/proc/config.gz", so it is easy to get
exactly what is working, although I keep my own bacup copies of
".config", for future references. When I am building a kernel, I use to
open the latest ".config" in a separate console, for reference. That has
kept me of forgetting plenty of details.



Thanks

Francisco
--
"If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples then you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and I have one idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas." - George Bernard Shaw
 
Old 10-14-2012, 02:46 PM
Dale
 
Default (sort of) strange things after upgrading the kernel

Francisco Ares wrote:


2012/10/13 Dale <rdalek1967@gmail.com>






Francisco Ares wrote:




2012/10/12 Dale <rdalek1967@gmail.com>


Francisco Ares wrote:

>

>

> Thanks for your reply, Dale.

>

> Yes, everything works as expected when
using the old kernel.

>

> I decided to re-emerge some base libraries,
and nothing worked, until

> I remembered to re-emerge udev. After the
build, it announced two

> wrong lines in the new kernel "config"
file:

>

> CONFIG_SYSFS_DEPRECATED=y

> CONFIG_SYSFS_DEPRECATED_V2=y

>

> After correcting them and building the
kernel again, now everything is

> back to normal.

>

> Thanks again

> Francisco

>

>

> --

> "If you have an apple and I have an apple
and we exchange apples then

> you and I will still each have one apple.
But if you have an idea and

> I have one idea and we exchange these
ideas, then each of us will have

> two ideas." - George Bernard Shaw






Do you use oldconfig or build each one from
scratch? *I use oldconfig so

that I at least have what I know works. *It's just
a matter of if I need

anything new enabled. *Some claim oldconfig
shouldn't be used but I have

only had it to fail once in the last 10 years or
so. *Most everyone I

know of uses oldconfig.



Glad you got it going tho.




Dale



:-) *:-)



--

I am only responsible for what I said ... Not
for what you understood or how you interpreted
my words!













I normally also use oldconfig. I think there might be
a reason for it to be around. But this time I didn't,
because the old kernel was version 2.6.39 and I
thought oldconfig would mess things up more than help
on the new 3.4.9. Don't know how right or wrong is
this assumption, though.



I just was lazy to upgrade the kernel, as it takes an
hour or so to check most of menucofig.



Francisco








I would have tried it but that is a LOT of updates.* It may
be faster to start from scratch in that case.* I know a few
years ago there was some changes that kept oldconfig from
working as it should.* That was the only time it failed me
but I do upgrade more often to avoid this sort of thing.* I
try to upgrade every couple months.* Now if I have long
uptimes, I may not actually ever use that kernel but I have
a config file to copy over that is a bit more up to date.*



I would suggest printing or something the output of the
following:* lspci -k* That tells you what you need for your
hardware, that is of course from a kernel where all your
hardware works.* There may be some specific things for
certain software that is needed but at least you can boot up
and have a system to work with.* I usually leave the rest to
defaults unless I am sure there is something I don't need.*




Glad you got it sorted out and working tho.*



Dale



:-)* :-)*

--
I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!








Hi, Dale



As my old kernel is from the 2.6 series and the new is from the
3.4, I decided to do a "menuconfig" from scratch. I do use "lspci"
and also I always build the kernel allowing "/proc/config.gz", so
it is easy to get exactly what is working, although I keep my own
bacup copies of ".config", for future references. When I am
building a kernel, I use to open the latest ".config" in a
separate console, for reference. That has kept me of forgetting
plenty of details.



Thanks

Francisco

--

"If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples
then you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an
idea and I have one idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of
us will have two ideas." - George Bernard Shaw






I can understand why.* There would have been a huge number of new
options to check on.* Doing it from scratch with menuconfig could
have been just as fast or maybe even faster.* May have been worth
trying but may have ended up with more issues.*



Using lspci -k does help.* Someone posted about the -k option and I
made a note of it since it gives the name of the driver.* If we know
the name of the driver, we know what to search for and enable.*
Makes life easier.*



The one time oldconfig failed, I had old kernel in one screen and
new kernel in another and was going section by section.* Sounds like
what you have done so we ended up doing this the same way.* It is
sometimes the best way and we don't miss the important stuff.* ;-)*




All things considered, turned out pretty good. Built a new kernel
from scratch, had only one minor issue.* Good day all around.* lol*




Dale



:-)* :-)*

--
I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!
 
Old 10-14-2012, 09:54 PM
Peter Humphrey
 
Default (sort of) strange things after upgrading the kernel

On Sunday 14 October 2012 15:46:43 Dale wrote:
> Francisco Ares wrote:
> > As my old kernel is from the 2.6 series and the new is from the
> > 3.4, I decided to do a "menuconfig" from scratch. I do use "lspci"
> > and also I always build the kernel allowing "/proc/config.gz", so
> > it is easy to get exactly what is working, although I keep my own
> > bacup copies of ".config", for future references. When I am
> > building a kernel, I use to open the latest ".config" in a
> > separate console, for reference. That has kept me of forgetting
> > plenty of details.
> >
> I can understand why. There would have been a huge number of new
> options to check on. Doing it from scratch with menuconfig could
> have been just as fast or maybe even faster. May have been worth
> trying but may have ended up with more issues.

I found long ago that menuconfig flags new options with [NEW] to the right
of the option name, so it's easy to find out what's changed since you
last ran a config operation. That can easily reduce a several-hours config
job to no more than half an hour. Still quite a task, but not in the
same league as configuring from scratch.

--
Rgds
Peter
 
Old 10-14-2012, 10:33 PM
Dale
 
Default (sort of) strange things after upgrading the kernel

Peter Humphrey wrote:
> On Sunday 14 October 2012 15:46:43 Dale wrote:
>> Francisco Ares wrote:
>>> As my old kernel is from the 2.6 series and the new is from the
>>> 3.4, I decided to do a "menuconfig" from scratch. I do use "lspci"
>>> and also I always build the kernel allowing "/proc/config.gz", so
>>> it is easy to get exactly what is working, although I keep my own
>>> bacup copies of ".config", for future references. When I am
>>> building a kernel, I use to open the latest ".config" in a
>>> separate console, for reference. That has kept me of forgetting
>>> plenty of details.
>>>
>> I can understand why. There would have been a huge number of new
>> options to check on. Doing it from scratch with menuconfig could
>> have been just as fast or maybe even faster. May have been worth
>> trying but may have ended up with more issues.
> I found long ago that menuconfig flags new options with [NEW] to the right
> of the option name, so it's easy to find out what's changed since you
> last ran a config operation. That can easily reduce a several-hours config
> job to no more than half an hour. Still quite a task, but not in the
> same league as configuring from scratch.
>


It does but you have to go through each menu to see what is new and what
is not and that's a lot of menus and submenus etc, etc. It still
increases the odds of missing something. Heck, even tho I use lspci -k
to make sure I have everything included for hardware, there is always
some piece of software that wants something added. Those are really
hard to keep track of, unless you make a lot of notes. That's where
oldconfig comes in since it only adjusts the new stuff and leaves the
old stuff like it was.

Using oldconfig is the fastest and easiest and as a general rule gives
you a good kernel. But when you are upgrading from that many version
ago, you could end up with something flakey or other odd things.

I think the OP likely did the best thing by just starting over. Also,
maybe now he knows to upgrade a little more often. lol We often learn
this the hard way. Just like when people don't sync and upgrade the OS
for a year or two. Depending on changes, reinstalling may be easier
depending on what issues have cropped up in that time and how fast a rig
can compile things. Again, it just depends on the situation and even
then can be a toss up as to which is the right way to go. Those of us
that have been around here a long time have seen people try to update a
badly out of date OS just to run into so many issues that they end up
reinstalling again anyway. The time spent trying to fix it can be
longer than just starting over sometimes. Not to mention having hair
left. ;-)

Me, I might would have tried it but not going to argue over it. The OP
is up and running and that is the important thing. It was only a few
electrons that were bent out of shape. lol

Dale

:-) :-)

--
I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!
 

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