FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > Gentoo > Gentoo User

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 08-06-2012, 11:51 AM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default Want to seriously test a NEW hard drive

On Mon, 06 Aug 2012 06:25:19 -0500, Dale wrote:

> While I am at it. You should have a good answer for this one. What is
> a good file system for this sort of thing? I been using ext4 but it
> sure does use a lot of space for its overhead.

My MythTV box used XFS, but I use ext4 on newer systems. If you're only
storing data on it, create the filesystem with the -m 0 option to make
all the space available.


--
Neil Bothwick

There is always one more imbecile than you counted on.
 
Old 08-06-2012, 11:58 AM
Michael Hampicke
 
Default Want to seriously test a NEW hard drive

> What I have on there is videos. When I tried to compress some and test,
> it was basically the same size. I guess videos don't compress to much?
>

No videos don't compress well at all, compressing video files is just a
waste of cpu cycles

> When I put this in, I'm going to redo the whole thing. Ages ago when I
> was green all over and not just around the gills, I created a /data
> directory and that is where I stored "stuff". My new plan, the new
> drive will become /home and I will be putting things where they should
> have been to begin with. I plan to reorganize this whole mess I created
> ages ago. That video directory is HUGE tho.
>
> root@fireball / # du -shc /data/Videos/
> 703G /data/Videos/
> 703G total
> root@fireball / #
>
> While I am at it. You should have a good answer for this one. What is
> a good file system for this sort of thing? I been using ext4 but it
> sure does use a lot of space for its overhead. As far as files go, most
> will likely be videos. I do have other files but when compared to the
> number of videos, they are close to nothing. The files system for the
> current 1Tb, spread across two drives with LVM, uses about 75Gbs for the
> file system thingy. That's a pretty good bit to me. I may lose more
> than 200Gbs on this 3Tb drive. O_O

I use XFS on my NAS-Box for the drives that only hold video files and I
am pretty happy with it. The advantage of XFS is, that it is very fast
when working with large files. For everything else I use ext4, pretty
happy with that too.
 
Old 08-06-2012, 12:01 PM
Mick
 
Default Want to seriously test a NEW hard drive

On Monday 06 Aug 2012 12:25:19 Dale wrote:

> What I have on there is videos. When I tried to compress some and test,
> it was basically the same size. I guess videos don't compress to much?

Not without transcoding the streams into more space efficient formats - but
you could well suffer from loss of quality (lossy formats and digital
generation losses). So YMMV.


> While I am at it. You should have a good answer for this one. What is
> a good file system for this sort of thing? I been using ext4 but it
> sure does use a lot of space for its overhead. As far as files go, most
> will likely be videos. I do have other files but when compared to the
> number of videos, they are close to nothing. The files system for the
> current 1Tb, spread across two drives with LVM, uses about 75Gbs for the
> file system thingy. That's a pretty good bit to me. I may lose more
> than 200Gbs on this 3Tb drive. O_O

That sounds like a lot! I'm waiting to see what others comment and
benchmarks.
--
Regards,
Mick
 
Old 08-06-2012, 12:17 PM
Mick
 
Default Want to seriously test a NEW hard drive

On Monday 06 Aug 2012 11:48:50 Hinnerk van Bruinehsen wrote:
> On 06.08.2012 12:14, Dale wrote:
> > Volker Armin Hemmann wrote:
> >> What do you gain if you abuse your drive so hard that its
> >> lifetime is severly impacted?
> >
> > That if it has a problem that will cause it to fail soon in it's
> > life, then I can find it soon. Remember that curve about failures?
> > I would like to get past that first part of the curve. Maybe by
> > the time I get to the later part, I'll have another drive or some
> > backup scheme. Most the failures I have read about in reviews for
> > this drive were early or was just plain old DOA. Testing it will
> > get me past that. I'd rather it fail before I get my data on it
> > instead of after.
> >
> > I thought I posted why I wanted to do this in my first post.
> >
> > Dale
> >
> > :-) :-)
>
> Why not simply get you data on it and use it for about 2 weeks? Maybe
> you should mirror important stuff to the old drive for that time.
>
> After about 2 weeks of normal usage you should be well out of the
> beginnig of that bathtub curve (I always had problems when copying
> data to the new drive when I had a bad one, except DOA of course).

The 'Conveyance self-test routine' of smartmontools will check for damage
during physical transport. If it is completely DOA, then that ought to be
obvious I guess.
--
Regards,
Mick
 
Old 08-06-2012, 03:17 PM
Paul Hartman
 
Default Want to seriously test a NEW hard drive

On Sun, Aug 5, 2012 at 7:45 AM, Dale <rdalek1967@gmail.com> wrote:
> Howdy,
>
> I finally got me a 3Tb drive on the way. Should be here Wednesday. I
> have seen some reviews where it would not work right. I think some of
> it may be BIOS related since some BIOS's don't like drives that large.
> Anyway, I want to test this thing real good to really make sure it is up
> to the task before putting my data on it. It's going to be so much
> data, there is really no way to do back-ups at this point. Come on, 2
> to 3Tbs on 4Gb DVDs. Really? lol Maybe a external drive later on but
> for now, well.
>
> I have heard of bonnie and friends. I also think dd could do some
> testing too. Is there any other way to give this a good work and see if
> it holds up? Oh, helpful hints with Bonnie would be great too. I have
> never used it before. Maybe someone has some test that is really brutal.

I wouldn't want to torture the drive, but just make sure it works.

What I do: boot parted magic liveCD, run ATA SECURE ERASE on the drive
(you probably need to suspend and awaken your machine to unlock the
drive, the GUI tool in the liveCD does this for you automatically),
that will do factory reformat/low-level reformat, then run SMART full
test which can take many hours. If it survives both of those, and
doesn't make audible clicking noises in the process, I feel confident
that it is in working order.

Those steps are more important if I'm testing a used or refurbished
drive, for a new drive you may want to skip the secure erase and only
do the smart test. If SMART test passes then I don't think there's any
reason to run badblocks, but you can have it run during mkfs if you
want reassurance.
 
Old 08-07-2012, 10:26 PM
Dale
 
Default Want to seriously test a NEW hard drive

Paul Hartman wrote:
> On Sun, Aug 5, 2012 at 7:45 AM, Dale <rdalek1967@gmail.com> wrote:
>> Howdy,
>>
>> I finally got me a 3Tb drive on the way. Should be here Wednesday. I
>> have seen some reviews where it would not work right. I think some of
>> it may be BIOS related since some BIOS's don't like drives that large.
>> Anyway, I want to test this thing real good to really make sure it is up
>> to the task before putting my data on it. It's going to be so much
>> data, there is really no way to do back-ups at this point. Come on, 2
>> to 3Tbs on 4Gb DVDs. Really? lol Maybe a external drive later on but
>> for now, well.
>>
>> I have heard of bonnie and friends. I also think dd could do some
>> testing too. Is there any other way to give this a good work and see if
>> it holds up? Oh, helpful hints with Bonnie would be great too. I have
>> never used it before. Maybe someone has some test that is really brutal.
> I wouldn't want to torture the drive, but just make sure it works.
>
> What I do: boot parted magic liveCD, run ATA SECURE ERASE on the drive
> (you probably need to suspend and awaken your machine to unlock the
> drive, the GUI tool in the liveCD does this for you automatically),
> that will do factory reformat/low-level reformat, then run SMART full
> test which can take many hours. If it survives both of those, and
> doesn't make audible clicking noises in the process, I feel confident
> that it is in working order.
>
> Those steps are more important if I'm testing a used or refurbished
> drive, for a new drive you may want to skip the secure erase and only
> do the smart test. If SMART test passes then I don't think there's any
> reason to run badblocks, but you can have it run during mkfs if you
> want reassurance.
>
>

Well, I don't want to force it to fail just for the heck of it. I just
want to make sure it is not going to fail in the first few months of
use. The reviews that people have wrote that had problems were
generally either out of the box dead or failed after a few weeks or a
month or so. I figure if I can run tests that would be about a month or
so of use, then maybe I am OK. That is my goal. I just don't want to
get all my data on there and such and then have it go belly up.

I didn't know you could do low level formats anymore. Really? What
package provides that? Hmmm, I'm thinking about those HOURS spent
formatting a 100Mb drive and then thinking about how long it will take
to do a 3Tb drive. O_O I mean really O_O. LOL

Dale

:-) :-)

P. S. It should be here tomorrow. UPS dropped it off at the post office
today.

--
I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!
 
Old 08-07-2012, 10:39 PM
Mark Knecht
 
Default Want to seriously test a NEW hard drive

On Tue, Aug 7, 2012 at 3:26 PM, Dale <rdalek1967@gmail.com> wrote:
<SNIP>
> Well, I don't want to force it to fail just for the heck of it.

Of course...

> I just
> want to make sure it is not going to fail in the first few months of
> use.

But what you don't know about those failed drives is whether the user
could have predicted it by watching the smartctl data more closely.

Dead out of the box is dead. However a drive failing in a couple of
months _might_ have showed up in the smartctl output in which case the
user could have transferred data to a new drive.

Keep in mind, that's all you're talking about here. You don't want to
spend the money for a second drive, but you know you'll have to do
_something_ if the drive starts failing. Not having backups isn't a
good plan...

Take care,
Mark
 
Old 08-07-2012, 11:05 PM
Dale
 
Default Want to seriously test a NEW hard drive

Mark Knecht wrote:
> On Tue, Aug 7, 2012 at 3:26 PM, Dale <rdalek1967@gmail.com> wrote:
> <SNIP>
>> Well, I don't want to force it to fail just for the heck of it.
> Of course...
>
>> I just
>> want to make sure it is not going to fail in the first few months of
>> use.
> But what you don't know about those failed drives is whether the user
> could have predicted it by watching the smartctl data more closely.
>
> Dead out of the box is dead. However a drive failing in a couple of
> months _might_ have showed up in the smartctl output in which case the
> user could have transferred data to a new drive.
>
> Keep in mind, that's all you're talking about here. You don't want to
> spend the money for a second drive, but you know you'll have to do
> _something_ if the drive starts failing. Not having backups isn't a
> good plan...
>
> Take care,
> Mark
>
>

I realize that not having backups is not good. Thing is, I really don't
have a way to back up that much data. Heck, I got about 1Tb that will
be transfered to the new drive when I feel it is ready. Other than a
second drive, I have no means of backing up that much data. I thought
about a blue ray burner but even that is a lot of media. I think I
figured up over a 100. Plain DVDs are even worse.

My plan is to watch the logs and buy another drive as soon as I can. In
the meantime, it is what it is. I don't like it but I can't change it
either. If it helps any, I have only had one drive to ever fail on me.
It was a WD and was pretty old. It gave me enough warning to get the
data off tho. We gotta love that.

Dale

:-) :-)

--
I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!
 
Old 08-07-2012, 11:06 PM
Peter Humphrey
 
Default Want to seriously test a NEW hard drive

On Tuesday 07 August 2012 23:39:05 Mark Knecht wrote:

> Dead out of the box is dead. However a drive failing in a couple of
> months _might_ have showed up in the smartctl output ...

I wonder. Does anyone here know what most often causes HD failure after
a couple of months? I imagine it's some component whose material is
substandard, in which case it might show up with smartclt or it might
not. I dunno.

--
Rgds
Peter
 
Old 08-07-2012, 11:07 PM
Paul Hartman
 
Default Want to seriously test a NEW hard drive

On Tue, Aug 7, 2012 at 5:26 PM, Dale <rdalek1967@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> I didn't know you could do low level formats anymore. Really? What
> package provides that? Hmmm, I'm thinking about those HOURS spent
> formatting a 100Mb drive and then thinking about how long it will take
> to do a 3Tb drive. O_O I mean really O_O. LOL

hdparm provides it. Do a search for "ATA secure erase" or "enhanced
secure erase". It is as close as there is to a low-level format in
modern drives. It is basically a erase/format within the drive's
firmware, that resets it all back to factory, including bad sectors,
with the same pattern of 1's and 0's and everything. You can do it
with hdparm but it's tricky and contains many warnings about killing
your drive. It is considered the only "true" way to properly erase a
hard drive as anything else is just overwriting and does not
necessarily touch all the areas that the firmware can touch. I think
actual implementation of what the secure erases do varies from drive
to drive, but they'll all format the whole disk for sure.

The parted magic live CD contains a GUI tool to automate it and it is
extremely simple to use. Choose your drive and go. On a 2tb drive I
think it took 4 or 5 hours when I ran it. There is absolutely no
feedback while it is running, so you're just waiting with no progress
indicator or anything. You can also do SMART tests from within the
parted magic live CD environment. And of course partitioning.

That all being said, when performing this kind of operation I usually
like to use a live CD and unplug ALL OTHER HARD DRIVES except for the
one I'm going to destroy. I don't want to accidentally erase the wrong
drive. (In fact I have an old Pentium 4 computer with no HDDs that I
use solely for the purpose of testing live CDs, testing and formatting
drives, partitioning new drives before i put them into a production
machine)
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 07:07 AM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org