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Old 07-19-2012, 07:32 PM
Randolph Maaßen
 
Default Gentoo Installation, Kernel Panic

2012/7/19 Andrejs Igumenovs <andrejs.igumenovs@gmail.com>

Hi,
After going over the installation instructions and performing the standard operations (genkernel etc.), the Kernel halts during the boot.http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/handbook-amd64.xml?part=1


I'm attaching the screenshot of what happens…
I'm not the Linux expert, so don't know how to fix.

- Andrejs


Hi,
looks like the kernel can't find your root partition. (VFS: Cannot open root device "sda3" or unknowen block(0,0)).

Please make sure that you configured your grub correctly (which version do you use?).
On grub legacy (0.9) *edit the file /boot/grub/menu.lst and add the "root=<your root partiton>" parameter

it should look like thistitle Gentooroot (hd0,1)kernel /boot/kernel* root=/dev/sda2
When you need further help, please post your partitioning and grub menu entry, grub device names can be verry confusing for beginners.

The more complex idea in my mind is that your kernel is missing some device drivers for the ide/sata controler.This should not happen, because you used genkernel.

Randolph
 
Old 07-19-2012, 09:09 PM
Oli Schmidt
 
Default Gentoo Installation, Kernel Panic

On 2012-07-19 21:32, Randolph Maaßen wrote:

2012/7/19 Andrejs Igumenovs <andrejs.igumenovs@gmail.com [2]>


Hi,

After going over the installation instructions and performing the
standard operations (genkernel etc.), the Kernel halts during the
boot.
http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/handbook-amd64.xml?part=1 [1]

Im attaching the screenshot of what happens…

Im not the Linux expert, so dont know how to fix.

- Andrejs


Hi,

looks like the kernel cant find your root partition. (VFS: Cannot
open

root device "sda3" or unknowen block(0,0)).

Please make sure that you configured your grub correctly (which
version do you use?).

On grub legacy (0.9) *edit the file /boot/grub/menu.lst and add the
"root=<your root partiton>" parameter

it should look like this
title Gentoo
root (hd0,1)
kernel /boot/kernel* root=/dev/sda2

When you need further help, please post your partitioning and grub
menu entry, grub device names can be verry confusing for beginners.

The more complex idea in my mind is that your kernel is missing some
device drivers for the ide/sata controler.
This should not happen, because you used genkernel.

Randolph

Links:
------
[1] http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/handbook-amd64.xml?part=1
[2] mailto:andrejs.igumenovs@gmail.com






Make sure the filesystem support is correct. What fs do you use - did
you enable it in the kernel config ?



regards
Oli
 
Old 07-19-2012, 09:28 PM
Alan McKinnon
 
Default Gentoo Installation, Kernel Panic

On Thu, 19 Jul 2012 22:09:31 +0300
Andrejs Igumenovs <andrejs.igumenovs@gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi,
>
> After going over the installation instructions and performing the
> standard operations (genkernel etc.), the Kernel halts during the
> boot. http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/handbook-amd64.xml?part=1
>
> I'm attaching the screenshot of what happens…
>
> I'm not the Linux expert, so don't know how to fix.

The main error is "cannot open root device sda3"

sda3 is the 3rd partition of the first hard disk (on a Windows machine
it would probably be E

Two things will cause that error:

The first disk doesn't have a third partition on it. Please describe
how your disks are laid out and where you unpacked the gentoo tarball
too. You can get this info by booting off a Live CD just like the first
part of the install and running "fdisk -l" as root in a terminal. Paste
the entire output in a mail reply and we'll take a look for you.

The second cause is your kernel doesn't have drivers for your
motherboard's chipset. These cannot be kernel modules, they must be
compiled in (unless you are building an initrd - but that's complicated
so I don't think you'll be going that route on the first try). Just
like the in first cause you can get good info from running

lspci
plus the entire content of one file - the kernel config. It's hard to
describe where it will be, but if you follow along in the install
guide, you boot off a LiveCD, chroot into the gentoo install
at /mnt/gentoo, then inside there you will find a
directory /usr/src/linux - you went there the first time to configure
the kernel. In that directory is a file called ".config". We need that
entire file to see if you configured the kernel with the minimum
requirements.

Also mention what filesystem you chose for the root partition: ext3,
ext4, reiser or maybe something else (but it's probably ext4)

--
Alan McKinnon
alan.mckinnon@gmail.com
 
Old 07-19-2012, 09:45 PM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default Gentoo Installation, Kernel Panic

On Thu, 19 Jul 2012 22:09:31 +0300, Andrejs Igumenovs wrote:

> I'm attaching the screenshot of what happens…

Why have you zipped a JPEG file? It makes it far more work for anyone to
view.

You probably haven't compiled the driver for your disk controller into
the kernel (not ass a module).


--
Neil Bothwick

Who messed with my anti-paranoia shot?
 
Old 07-20-2012, 06:09 AM
Nilesh Govindrajan
 
Default Gentoo Installation, Kernel Panic

On Fri, Jul 20, 2012 at 3:15 AM, Neil Bothwick <neil@digimed.co.uk> wrote:
> On Thu, 19 Jul 2012 22:09:31 +0300, Andrejs Igumenovs wrote:
>
>> I'm attaching the screenshot of what happens…
>
> Why have you zipped a JPEG file? It makes it far more work for anyone to
> view.
>
> You probably haven't compiled the driver for your disk controller into
> the kernel (not ass a module).
>
>
> --
> Neil Bothwick
>
> Who messed with my anti-paranoia shot?

Sometimes the disk order gets messed up on boot. My first disk (as per
SATA bus) sometimes gets the letter sdb instead of sda. The solution
is to use disk labels. Label your file systems (e2label, if you're
using ext* FS, or xfs_admin for xfs).
Uncomment DISKLABEL="yes" in genkernel if not already.

And specify disk partitions as root=LABEL=FOO where FOO is the label
you used for root filesystem. Do not forget to update fstab with the
same (using labels).

Here's my fstab for a sample and grub.cfg (grub2); posting only relevant lines.

FSTAB-
LABEL=Gentoo / ext4
defaults,noatime,discard 0 1

grub.cfg-
linux /boot/kernel-genkernel-x86_64-3.4.4-gentoo-ck2
real_root=UUID=90e64854-d65c-4419-a629-4e2ca621a7a0 ro
real_rootflags=noatime,discard,data=writeback rootfstype=ext4

Since I use grub2-mkconfig to generate the configuration, it's there
with UUID, but it works with LABEL as well, I have tried it.
Also, *don't* build your kernel *without* initramfs, because the
kernel by default doesn't support mounting by LABELs or UUIDs (I think
so, I've had failures w/o initrd).

--
Nilesh Govindarajan
http://nileshgr.com
 

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