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Old 06-18-2012, 06:16 AM
 
Default Getting around ancient SATA disk size limitations

I have an ancient system which was quite the bee's knees in its day 8 years ago, but is showing its age.

I plugged two 4TB SATA drives in and the BIOS hangs trying to display the disk size. Whether it is the size itself, or from using 4K blocks, I do not know.

I bought a USB 3.0 disk enclosure and the system refused to even acknowledge its presence. USB 3.0 may be advertised as backwards compatible, but not on my system.

I put one of the drives into an old USB 2.0 enclosure, and while it was found and useable, it saw the size as 1.6TB.

I can't get a USB 3.0 PCI card; there are PCI-e cards, but my system is PCI and PCI-X.

I did get a SATA II PCI card (SATA III requires PCI-e), but won't get a chance to plug it in for a few days. I'm hoping it will let me use the 4T drives.

Does anyone know of any verified cheap tricks to make this old system recognize the 4TB drives properly? I'm not interested in any NAS or other expensive solutions; I'd just as soon buy a cheap modern system and lots of USB 3.0 disk enclosures. But I'd rather not go that route yet.

--
... _._. ._ ._. . _._. ._. ___ .__ ._. . .__. ._ .. ._.
Felix Finch: scarecrow repairman & rocket surgeon / felix@crowfix.com
GPG = E987 4493 C860 246C 3B1E 6477 7838 76E9 182E 8151 ITAR license #4933
I've found a solution to Fermat's Last Theorem but I see I've run out of room o
 
Old 06-18-2012, 06:35 AM
Bill Kenworthy
 
Default Getting around ancient SATA disk size limitations

On Sun, 2012-06-17 at 23:16 -0700, felix@crowfix.com wrote:
> I have an ancient system which was quite the bee's knees in its day 8 years ago, but is showing its age.
>
> I plugged two 4TB SATA drives in and the BIOS hangs trying to display the disk size. Whether it is the size itself, or from using 4K blocks, I do not know.
>
> I bought a USB 3.0 disk enclosure and the system refused to even acknowledge its presence. USB 3.0 may be advertised as backwards compatible, but not on my system.
>
> I put one of the drives into an old USB 2.0 enclosure, and while it was found and useable, it saw the size as 1.6TB.
>
> I can't get a USB 3.0 PCI card; there are PCI-e cards, but my system is PCI and PCI-X.
>
> I did get a SATA II PCI card (SATA III requires PCI-e), but won't get a chance to plug it in for a few days. I'm hoping it will let me use the 4T drives.
>
> Does anyone know of any verified cheap tricks to make this old system recognize the 4TB drives properly? I'm not interested in any NAS or other expensive solutions; I'd just as soon buy a cheap modern system and lots of USB 3.0 disk enclosures. But I'd rather not go that route yet.
>

32bit or 64 bit system?

Kernel options for large file systems?

BillK
 
Old 06-18-2012, 08:06 AM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default Getting around ancient SATA disk size limitations

On Sun, 17 Jun 2012 23:16:24 -0700, felix@crowfix.com wrote:

> I plugged two 4TB SATA drives in and the BIOS hangs trying to display
> the disk size. Whether it is the size itself, or from using 4K blocks,
> I do not know.

Have you updated the BIOS to the latest available version?


--
Neil Bothwick

Windows Error #56: Operator fell asleep while waiting.
 
Old 06-18-2012, 01:09 PM
 
Default Getting around ancient SATA disk size limitations

On Mon, Jun 18, 2012 at 02:35:03PM +0800, Bill Kenworthy wrote:
> 32bit or 64 bit system?

Dual opteron, ~amd64.

> Kernel options for large file systems?

Yes.

--
... _._. ._ ._. . _._. ._. ___ .__ ._. . .__. ._ .. ._.
Felix Finch: scarecrow repairman & rocket surgeon / felix@crowfix.com
GPG = E987 4493 C860 246C 3B1E 6477 7838 76E9 182E 8151 ITAR license #4933
I've found a solution to Fermat's Last Theorem but I see I've run out of room o
 
Old 06-18-2012, 01:11 PM
 
Default Getting around ancient SATA disk size limitations

On Mon, Jun 18, 2012 at 09:06:54AM +0100, Neil Bothwick wrote:
> On Sun, 17 Jun 2012 23:16:24 -0700, felix@crowfix.com wrote:
>
> > I plugged two 4TB SATA drives in and the BIOS hangs trying to display
> > the disk size. Whether it is the size itself, or from using 4K blocks,
> > I do not know.
>
> Have you updated the BIOS to the latest available version?

No, didn't even think about that. I've never upgraded BIOS an any of
my systems. It's a Tyan S2882 Thunder K8S Pro. Guess I'll google for that.


--
... _._. ._ ._. . _._. ._. ___ .__ ._. . .__. ._ .. ._.
Felix Finch: scarecrow repairman & rocket surgeon / felix@crowfix.com
GPG = E987 4493 C860 246C 3B1E 6477 7838 76E9 182E 8151 ITAR license #4933
I've found a solution to Fermat's Last Theorem but I see I've run out of room o
 
Old 06-18-2012, 01:24 PM
 
Default Getting around ancient SATA disk size limitations

On Mon, Jun 18, 2012 at 06:11:31AM -0700, felix@crowfix.com wrote:
> On Mon, Jun 18, 2012 at 09:06:54AM +0100, Neil Bothwick wrote:
> > On Sun, 17 Jun 2012 23:16:24 -0700, felix@crowfix.com wrote:
> >
> > > I plugged two 4TB SATA drives in and the BIOS hangs trying to display
> > > the disk size. Whether it is the size itself, or from using 4K blocks,
> > > I do not know.
> >
> > Have you updated the BIOS to the latest available version?
>
> No, didn't even think about that. I've never upgraded BIOS an any of
> my systems. It's a Tyan S2882 Thunder K8S Pro. Guess I'll google for that.

Found a Tyan page for my motherboard. Didn't see any obvious fixes
for SATA size. I also don't remember my BIOS version, I'll have to
check that.

--
... _._. ._ ._. . _._. ._. ___ .__ ._. . .__. ._ .. ._.
Felix Finch: scarecrow repairman & rocket surgeon / felix@crowfix.com
GPG = E987 4493 C860 246C 3B1E 6477 7838 76E9 182E 8151 ITAR license #4933
I've found a solution to Fermat's Last Theorem but I see I've run out of room o
 
Old 06-18-2012, 01:59 PM
walt
 
Default Getting around ancient SATA disk size limitations

On 06/17/2012 11:16 PM, felix@crowfix.com wrote:
> I bought a USB 3.0 disk enclosure and the system refused to even
> acknowledge its presence.

By 'system' do you mean the BIOS, or the kernel driver?
 
Old 06-18-2012, 02:12 PM
pk
 
Default Getting around ancient SATA disk size limitations

On 2012-06-18 08:16, felix@crowfix.com wrote:

> I plugged two 4TB SATA drives in and the BIOS hangs trying to display the disk size.
>Whether it is the size itself, or from using 4K blocks, I do not know.

This is a bit confusing. Do you mean to say that these are 4TB internal
drives (3.5")? I can't find any manufacturer that manufactures this size
(yet)... Or is it 2x 2TB harddrives in a USB3 enclosure? There are
plenty of those it seems from Seagate, Western digital etc...

>I bought a USB 3.0 disk enclosure and the system refused to even acknowledge its presence.
>USB 3.0 may be advertised as backwards compatible, but not on my system.

If possible try a BIOS upgrade... if not you can always try this (no
guarantees though):
http://www.addonics.com/products/ad2u3pci.php

> I put one of the drives into an old USB 2.0 enclosure, and while it was found and useable,
>it saw the size as 1.6TB.

For a 2TB a usable size of 1.6TB sounds about right...

> I can't get a USB 3.0 PCI card; there are PCI-e cards, but my system is PCI and PCI-X.

See above...

Maybe more questions than answers but hopefully they will give you a
clue or two for the correct answer(s)...

Best regards

Peter K
 
Old 06-18-2012, 02:24 PM
Michael Mol
 
Default Getting around ancient SATA disk size limitations

On Mon, Jun 18, 2012 at 10:12 AM, pk <peterk2@coolmail.se> wrote:
> On 2012-06-18 08:16, felix@crowfix.com wrote:
>
>> I plugged two 4TB SATA drives in and the BIOS hangs trying to display the disk size.
>>Whether it is the size itself, or from using 4K blocks, I do not know.
>
> This is a bit confusing. Do you mean to say that these are 4TB internal
> drives (3.5")? I can't find any manufacturer that manufactures this size
> (yet)... Or is it 2x 2TB harddrives in a USB3 enclosure? There are
> plenty of those it seems from Seagate, Western digital etc...

http://www.amazon.com/Seagate-Barracuda-3-5-Inch-Internal-ST4000DX000/dp/B005WX3NEU/

"Seagate Barracuda 7200 4 TB 7200RPM SATA 6 Gb/s NCQ 128MB Cache
3.5-Inch Internal Bare Drive"

It does bring to mind a question...when I went to put SATAII drives in
a SATA box, I needed to flip a jumper on the drive so that it would
operate at 1.5Gb/s instead of 3Gb/s. Felix, did you follow any
analogous steps for the 4TB drives?

(Cripes, that's a lot of data. One drive, bigger than any of my
aggregate volumes.)

--
:wq
 
Old 06-18-2012, 02:28 PM
 
Default Getting around ancient SATA disk size limitations

On Mon, Jun 18, 2012 at 06:59:13AM -0700, walt wrote:
> On 06/17/2012 11:16 PM, felix@crowfix.com wrote:
> > I bought a USB 3.0 disk enclosure and the system refused to even
> > acknowledge its presence.
>
> By 'system' do you mean the BIOS, or the kernel driver?

I plugged them into the USB after boot, so it's the kernel. I didn't try booting with them.

--
... _._. ._ ._. . _._. ._. ___ .__ ._. . .__. ._ .. ._.
Felix Finch: scarecrow repairman & rocket surgeon / felix@crowfix.com
GPG = E987 4493 C860 246C 3B1E 6477 7838 76E9 182E 8151 ITAR license #4933
I've found a solution to Fermat's Last Theorem but I see I've run out of room o
 

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