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Old 05-29-2012, 11:51 AM
"Stefan G. Weichinger"
 
Default ~gcc-4.7.0

Am 29.05.2012 11:42, schrieb Nikos Chantziaras:
> On 28/05/12 23:04, Stefan G. Weichinger wrote:
>>
>> As GCC-4.7.0 appeared for ~amd64 now ...
>>
>> anyone recompiled system or world with it already?
>>
>> More advantages or disadvantages?
>
> Since you didn't mention any specific workloads (like audio or video
> compression), I assume you're a typical desktop user (internet browsing,
> email, watching movies, listening to music, etc.) There will be no
> differences in performance with GCC 4.7.

Yes, typical desktop/office user.
Some virtualization stuff as well (VMware player, KVM) ...

Thanks, Stefan
 
Old 05-29-2012, 11:54 AM
walt
 
Default ~gcc-4.7.0

On 05/28/2012 01:04 PM, Stefan G. Weichinger wrote:
>
> As GCC-4.7.0 appeared for ~amd64 now ...

Cool. I hadn't noticed it yet.

> anyone recompiled system or world with it already?
>
> More advantages or disadvantages?

Maybe a year ago I started having problems building virtualbox on my
older/smaller machine. There is one place which ran through my puny
1GB of ram and then went on to fill up another 2GB of swap before
oomkill stepped in.

That turned out to be a gcc bug, and a proper fix was added to gcc
4.7.0 but not back-ported to 4.5.3, which I'm still using.

Since then I scavenged half of that 1GB of RAM for my wife's machine,
so it should be fun to try to build virtualbox with the other half
 
Old 05-29-2012, 11:58 AM
"Stefan G. Weichinger"
 
Default ~gcc-4.7.0

Am 29.05.2012 13:35, schrieb Ezequiel Garcia:

> Have anyone tried to compile linux kernels with gcc 4.7?
> Is it faster / smarter ?
> Does it shows more warnings or produce faster / smaller code or something ?

Compiled gentoo-sources-3.4.0 on ~amd64 with gcc 4.7.0.
Works.

Did no benchmarks, nothing really noticeable so far ...

Stefan
 
Old 05-29-2012, 12:58 PM
Michael Mol
 
Default ~gcc-4.7.0

On Tue, May 29, 2012 at 4:30 AM, microcai <microcai@fedoraproject.org> wrote:

> 2012/5/29 Michael Mol <mikemol@gmail.com>

[snip]

>> I'm mostly looking forward to Bulldozer support and RDRAND.
>>
>
> LOL I thought no one buys it

The average decent-quality AMD-supporting motherboard that supports
the level of contemporary features I want costs 100-130 USD, and I
generally go for a CPU in the range of $150-$180. So that's a total
ticket price of about $250-$310 USD. I've been using AMD machines in
my home for five or six years, now; generally, when one box gets
upgraded, parts of it (especially the CPU) get put into a different
box to upgrade that. That hasn't been possible on Intel.

An Intel-supporting motherboard with the level of contemporary
features I want becomes my first hurdle. Just for the base set of
features I'd want (6 current-speed SATA ports, max "supported" RAM of
32GB, LGA1155), I'm looking at $230 and up. For a processor?
$200-$320. And I'd want an i7, not an i5, so we're talking upper
range.

Yes, the early Bulldozers don't measure up to the Phenom II, but
amdfam10 is going away, and Bulldozer will get past that mark. Rather
similar how Intel's early NetBurst cores didn't manage to beat Pentium
IIIs, but later ones did. (Yeah, NetBurst eventually bit the dust,
and for good reason. I have to think, though, that a lot of what Intel
learned with NetBurst went into preparing them for Sandy Bridge's
incredible overclocking range.)

So, yeah, while I'd love a performance-grade Intel desktop box, it's
going to be hard to justify the price ticket. Even if I don't manage
to get an IvyBridge desktop box, I do want to get my hands on an
IvyBridge i3 motherboard; that RDRAND instruction is going to be sweet
in a network gateway machine, and the power consumption deliciously
low.

--
:wq
 
Old 05-29-2012, 01:01 PM
Adam Carter
 
Default ~gcc-4.7.0

> Hi,
>
> as far as I can tell it works mostly. There are some packages which
> seem to break:
>
> - - firefox and thunderbird, if I remember correctly

looks like that's fixed, from the firefox ChangeLog
28 May 2012; <anarchy@gentoo.org> firefox-12.0-r1.ebuild:
Finish adding support for gcc-4.7, bug #410557

and the thunderbird Changlog has similar.
 
Old 05-29-2012, 02:11 PM
Michael Orlitzky
 
Default ~gcc-4.7.0

On 05/29/12 06:26, Hinnerk van Bruinehsen wrote:
> - hardened-sources: the neccessary gcc-plugins don't work because they
> can't find the right symbols because gcc-4.7 is normally compiled with
> g++ which mangles the symbols. Don't know how to work around that,
> though it seems to be possible to compile gcc-4.7 with gcc - I just
> don't know how

There's a progress report on this in the latest meeting log:

http://archives.gentoo.org/gentoo-hardened/txtZMdHjDUoGa.txt
 
Old 05-29-2012, 04:18 PM
Volker Armin Hemmann
 
Default ~gcc-4.7.0

Am Dienstag, 29. Mai 2012, 08:58:52 schrieb Michael Mol:
> On Tue, May 29, 2012 at 4:30 AM, microcai <microcai@fedoraproject.org>
wrote:
> > 2012/5/29 Michael Mol <mikemol@gmail.com>
>
> [snip]
>
> >> I'm mostly looking forward to Bulldozer support and RDRAND.
> >
> > LOL I thought no one buys it
>
> The average decent-quality AMD-supporting motherboard that supports
> the level of contemporary features I want costs 100-130 USD, and I
> generally go for a CPU in the range of $150-$180. So that's a total
> ticket price of about $250-$310 USD. I've been using AMD machines in
> my home for five or six years, now; generally, when one box gets
> upgraded, parts of it (especially the CPU) get put into a different
> box to upgrade that. That hasn't been possible on Intel.
>
> An Intel-supporting motherboard with the level of contemporary
> features I want becomes my first hurdle. Just for the base set of
> features I'd want (6 current-speed SATA ports, max "supported" RAM of
> 32GB, LGA1155), I'm looking at $230 and up. For a processor?
> $200-$320. And I'd want an i7, not an i5, so we're talking upper
> range.
>
> Yes, the early Bulldozers don't measure up to the Phenom II, but
> amdfam10 is going away, and Bulldozer will get past that mark. Rather
> similar how Intel's early NetBurst cores didn't manage to beat Pentium
> IIIs, but later ones did. (Yeah, NetBurst eventually bit the dust,
> and for good reason. I have to think, though, that a lot of what Intel
> learned with NetBurst went into preparing them for Sandy Bridge's
> incredible overclocking range.)
>
> So, yeah, while I'd love a performance-grade Intel desktop box, it's
> going to be hard to justify the price ticket. Even if I don't manage
> to get an IvyBridge desktop box, I do want to get my hands on an
> IvyBridge i3 motherboard; that RDRAND instruction is going to be sweet
> in a network gateway machine, and the power consumption deliciously
> low.

and maybe buying intel is not a good idea at all:

http://semiaccurate.com/2012/05/15/intel-small-business-advantage-is-a-
security-nightmare/

--
#163933
 

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