Linux Archive

Linux Archive (http://www.linux-archive.org/)
-   Gentoo User (http://www.linux-archive.org/gentoo-user/)
-   -   ogg/mp3 volume (http://www.linux-archive.org/gentoo-user/668539-ogg-mp3-volume.html)

Pandu Poluan 05-19-2012 12:22 PM

ogg/mp3 volume
 
On May 19, 2012 7:00 PM, "Andrew Lowe" <agl@wht.com.au> wrote:

>

> Hi all,

> * * * *Is there a way to change the "volume" of a mp3/vorbis track? By volume, I'm referring to lining up several tracks on your computer/phone/tablet/thingy, setting the one volume level and then letting them play. For example, the first track will be quiet, of all ironies my Led Zeppelin tracks are all like this, the next track will be loud, the next track "in the middle", in other words it's Goldilocks and the three bears with audio tracks.


>

> * * * *Is there a way I can either during the ripping process, or subsequently in a post-processing, make the "average" volume of all my tracks the same?

>

> * * * *Any thoughts greatly appreciated,

>


What you're looking for is called "replay gain" (alternative spelling, "replaygain"). Basically, it's a two-step process : (1) analyze the 'effective loudness' of a track, and (2) add a tag indicating the difference between the measured 'effective loudness' with a reference level of 89 dB SPL



http://wiki.hydrogenaudio.org/index.php?title=ReplayGain


The above wiki article might be out of date with regards to the available software. Try asking around in the HydrogenAudio forums. They are a bunch of friendly guys ;-)


(PS: my handle there is "pepoluan", although honestly I haven't dabbled in any forum discussions for several years.)


Rgds,

Willie Matthews 05-19-2012 12:32 PM

ogg/mp3 volume
 
Nice! I will have to go and try that one soon.



On 05/19/12 05:22, Pandu Poluan wrote:




On May 19, 2012 7:00 PM, "Andrew Lowe" <agl@wht.com.au>
wrote:

>

> Hi all,

> * * * *Is there a way to change the "volume" of a
mp3/vorbis track? By volume, I'm referring to lining up several
tracks on your computer/phone/tablet/thingy, setting the one
volume level and then letting them play. For example, the first
track will be quiet, of all ironies my Led Zeppelin tracks are
all like this, the next track will be loud, the next track "in
the middle", in other words it's Goldilocks and the three bears
with audio tracks.

>

> * * * *Is there a way I can either during the ripping
process, or subsequently in a post-processing, make the
"average" volume of all my tracks the same?

>

> * * * *Any thoughts greatly appreciated,

>


What you're looking for is called "replay gain" (alternative
spelling, "replaygain"). Basically, it's a two-step process :
(1) analyze the 'effective loudness' of a track, and (2) add a
tag indicating the difference between the measured 'effective
loudness' with a reference level of 89 dB SPL


http://wiki.hydrogenaudio.org/index.php?title=ReplayGain


The above wiki article might be out of date with regards to the
available software. Try asking around in the HydrogenAudio
forums. They are a bunch of friendly guys ;-)


(PS: my handle there is "pepoluan", although honestly I haven't
dabbled in any forum discussions for several years.)


Rgds,






--

Willie Matthews
matthews.willie@gmail.com

Andrew Lowe 05-19-2012 02:18 PM

ogg/mp3 volume
 
On 05/19/12 20:22, Pandu Poluan wrote:


On May 19, 2012 7:00 PM, "Andrew Lowe" <agl@wht.com.au
<mailto:agl@wht.com.au>> wrote:
>
> Hi all,

[snip]
...
...
...
[snip]


What you're looking for is called "replay gain" (alternative spelling,
"replaygain"). Basically, it's a two-step process : (1) analyze the
'effective loudness' of a track, and (2) add a tag indicating the
difference between the measured 'effective loudness' with a reference
level of 89 dB SPL

http://wiki.hydrogenaudio.org/index.php?title=ReplayGain

The above wiki article might be out of date with regards to the
available software. Try asking around in the HydrogenAudio forums. They
are a bunch of friendly guys ;-)

(PS: my handle there is "pepoluan", although honestly I haven't dabbled
in any forum discussions for several years.)

Rgds,



Pandu,

Thanks for the reply, I'll look into it tomorrow.

Regards,
Andrew

05-19-2012 02:19 PM

ogg/mp3 volume
 
On Sat, May 19, 2012 at 07:54:10PM +0800, Andrew Lowe wrote:
> Hi all,
> Is there a way to change the "volume" of a mp3/vorbis track? By volume,
> I'm referring to lining up several tracks on your
> computer/phone/tablet/thingy, setting the one volume level and then
> letting them play. For example, the first track will be quiet, of all
> ironies my Led Zeppelin tracks are all like this, the next track will be
> loud, the next track "in the middle", in other words it's Goldilocks and
> the three bears with audio tracks.
>
> Is there a way I can either during the ripping process, or subsequently
> in a post-processing, make the "average" volume of all my tracks the same?
>
> Any thoughts greatly appreciated,
>
> Andrew

don't rip myself, but back in the day, the big ripping programs would usu
have some kind of 'leveling' plugin that would equalize the volumes on all
the tracks.

Terry

Jesús J. Guerrero Botella 05-20-2012 09:41 AM

ogg/mp3 volume
 
Just for sake of correctness, what the op wants is called normalization, in the world of sound edition.


It can be done once, as you rip the file or it can be done on the fly when playing it. "replaygain" is (as the name itself says) an implementation of this that automatically adjusts the gain of each soundtrack. But its just the name of the concrete implementation, not the name of the process. Just like volvo is a brand of cars, but not all cars are branded volvo.



I,ll add that if you normalize while ripping you are damaging permanently the audio files, which in addition to a loussy format like mp3, and cheap speakers, can result in a very bad thing, but that really depends on how demanding your ear is...



Specially for bands like led zeppelin, I would just use the second method (adjust while playing, rather than while ripping). Someday you will want to hear the whole disk as it was intended, and if you normalized on ripping you won't be able to.


---

Jesús Guerrero Botella

El 19/05/2012 16:22, <ny6p01@gmail.com> escribió:
On Sat, May 19, 2012 at 07:54:10PM +0800, Andrew Lowe wrote:

> Hi all,

> * * * Is there a way to change the "volume" of a mp3/vorbis track? By volume,

> I'm referring to lining up several tracks on your

> computer/phone/tablet/thingy, setting the one volume level and then

> letting them play. For example, the first track will be quiet, of all

> ironies my Led Zeppelin tracks are all like this, the next track will be

> loud, the next track "in the middle", in other words it's Goldilocks and

> the three bears with audio tracks.

>

> * * * Is there a way I can either during the ripping process, or subsequently

> in a post-processing, make the "average" volume of all my tracks the same?

>

> * * * Any thoughts greatly appreciated,

>

> * * * * * * * Andrew



don't rip myself, but back in the day, the big ripping programs would usu

have some kind of 'leveling' plugin that would equalize the volumes on all

the tracks.



Terry

Stroller 05-20-2012 05:01 PM

ogg/mp3 volume
 
On 20 May 2012, at 10:41, Jesús J. Guerrero Botella wrote:
> ...
> Specially for bands like led zeppelin, I would just use the second method (adjust while playing, rather than while ripping). Someday you will want to hear the whole disk as it was intended, …

I agree that adjust-whilst-playing is the best method, but we won't be hearing this music as intended for a while.

All digital Led Zep releases (i.e. including all CDs) are notoriously poorly remastered, with excessive gain applied.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loudness_war

So far they have deteriorated with each remastering / re-release.

Huge threads on the Steve Hoffman forums discussing this, if you want to cork sniff.

Stroller.

Nikos Chantziaras 05-20-2012 06:48 PM

ogg/mp3 volume
 
On 20/05/12 12:41, Jesús J. Guerrero Botella wrote:

Just for sake of correctness, what the op wants is called normalization,
in the world of sound edition.


Actually, no. That's not what he wants. Normalization simply adjusts
to 0db. How loud something sounds however is not a simple matter of
what the maximum peak of a waveform is. ReplayGain actually analyzes
the music to tell how loud it *sounds*, not how loud it actually is.


For example, you can have audio that was normalized (0db) but doesn't
sound as loud as, say, -5db audio, but which has compressed dynamic range.


Normalization makes audio equally loud for hardware. ReplayGain makes
audio equally loud for humans. :-)

05-21-2012 12:44 AM

ogg/mp3 volume
 
On Sun, May 20, 2012 at 06:01:27PM +0100, Stroller wrote:
>
> On 20 May 2012, at 10:41, Jes?s J. Guerrero Botella wrote:
> > ...
> > Specially for bands like led zeppelin, I would just use the second method (adjust while playing, rather than while ripping). Someday you will want to hear the whole disk as it was intended, ?
>
> I agree that adjust-whilst-playing is the best method, but we won't be hearing this music as intended for a while.
>
> All digital Led Zep releases (i.e. including all CDs) are notoriously poorly remastered, with excessive gain applied.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loudness_war
>
> So far they have deteriorated with each remastering / re-release.
>
> Huge threads on the Steve Hoffman forums discussing this, if you want to cork sniff.
>
> Stroller.

I can attest to this - Led Zep II - awful. An older disk, not even a
remaster. I can only play it at moderate levels - it loses all it's dynamic
range at higher levels. A big disappointment.

Michael Mol 05-21-2012 01:07 AM

ogg/mp3 volume
 
On Sun, May 20, 2012 at 8:44 PM, <ny6p01@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sun, May 20, 2012 at 06:01:27PM +0100, Stroller wrote:
>>
>> On 20 May 2012, at 10:41, Jes?s J. Guerrero Botella wrote:
>> > ...
>> > Specially for bands like led zeppelin, I would just use the second method (adjust while playing, rather than while ripping). Someday you will want to hear the whole disk as it was intended, ?
>>
>> I agree that adjust-whilst-playing is the best method, but we won't be hearing this music as intended for a while.
>>
>> All digital Led Zep releases (i.e. including all CDs) are notoriously poorly remastered, with excessive gain applied.
>>
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loudness_war
>>
>> So far they have deteriorated with each remastering / re-release.
>>
>> Huge threads on the Steve Hoffman forums discussing this, if you want to cork sniff.
>>
>> Stroller.
>
> I can attest to this - Led Zep II - awful. An older disk, not even a
> remaster. *I can only play it at moderate levels - it loses all it's dynamic
> range at higher levels. *A big disappointment.

Dipping only slightly further offtopic, are they still pressing vinyl?
I believe there are a number of tools for automatically splitting and
transcoding audio input from a vinyl player.


--
:wq

Andrew Lowe 05-21-2012 02:14 PM

ogg/mp3 volume
 
On 21/05/2012 2:48 AM, Nikos Chantziaras wrote:

On 20/05/12 12:41, Jesús J. Guerrero Botella wrote:

Just for sake of correctness, what the op wants is called normalization,
in the world of sound edition.


Actually, no. That's not what he wants. Normalization simply adjusts to
0db. How loud something sounds however is not a simple matter of what
the maximum peak of a waveform is. ReplayGain actually analyzes the
music to tell how loud it *sounds*, not how loud it actually is.

For example, you can have audio that was normalized (0db) but doesn't
sound as loud as, say, -5db audio, but which has compressed dynamic range.

Normalization makes audio equally loud for hardware. ReplayGain makes
audio equally loud for humans. :-)



Aarrrggghhh, I'm getting confused. More background on my original
question. I work in a liquor store and the manager insists on playing
the usual crappy FM radio station, "MORE HITS WHEN YOU WANT THEM AND WE
HAVE THE BEST VARIETY......blah blah blah". I'm going crazy so I've
loaded up a memory stick with music from my media machine and using a
small Android tablet, play the music through the sound system instead of
the radio. As you can guess this is not audiophile central, a cheap,
quite old "3 in 1" sound system, one speaker one end of the shop,
another in the middle of the shop.


I can't do the turn up/turn down thingy as I might set the level when I
start, and it may happen to be a quiet song. I then head down the other
end of the shop, the track finishes and is then followed by a loud
track, which is most likely excessively loud for a shop. Or conversely I
start with a loud track, set the level and then it's followed by a quiet
track and the shop goes quiet.


I have no intention of applying whatever process to the media machine,
the tracks on that remain as ripped. I only want to "fiddle" the tracks
on the memory stick. As this is on an Android tablet, quite a cheap one
at that, I'm also not sure how whizz bang the media player is so if I
can get away with the tracks being as "standard" as possible would be
good - my reading earlier on in this thread leads me to believe
ReplayGain may not, although I'll prepared to test, be supported.


So with that background, normalise or ReplayGain?

Thanks for the discussion and thoughts,

Andrew


All times are GMT. The time now is 07:11 AM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.