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Old 03-14-2012, 05:23 PM
Jarry
 
Default How can I trigger kernel panic?

Hi,

my question might seem silly, but I have reason for it:
I have heard there is way to auto-reboot linux after kernel
panic using "kernel.panic=<time>" in /etc/sysctl.conf.

This might come handy as my server is far from me and I do
not have any remote console. But I would like to test it
and see if it works (first on my desktop).

So my question is: Can I somehow deliberately trigger
"kernel panic" (or "kernel oops")?

Jarry
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Old 03-14-2012, 05:41 PM
"ZHANG, Le"
 
Default How can I trigger kernel panic?

On Wed, Mar 14, 2012 at 11:23 AM, Jarry <mr.jarry@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,



my question might seem silly, but I have reason for it:

I have heard there is way to auto-reboot linux after kernel

panic using "kernel.panic=<time>" in /etc/sysctl.conf.



This might come handy as my server is far from me and I do

not have any remote console. But I would like to test it

and see if it works (first on my desktop).



So my question is: Can I somehow deliberately trigger

"kernel panic" (or "kernel oops")?
For panic,Â*echo c > /proc/sysrq-triggerÂ*




Jarry

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Everything else is considered to be spam and therefore deleted.





--
Zhang Le, Robert
Gentoo/Loongson(龙芯) Developer
http://zhangle.is-a-geek.org
 
Old 03-14-2012, 05:48 PM
Michael Orlitzky
 
Default How can I trigger kernel panic?

On 03/14/12 14:23, Jarry wrote:
> Hi,
>
> my question might seem silly, but I have reason for it:
> I have heard there is way to auto-reboot linux after kernel
> panic using "kernel.panic=<time>" in /etc/sysctl.conf.
>
> This might come handy as my server is far from me and I do
> not have any remote console. But I would like to test it
> and see if it works (first on my desktop).
>
> So my question is: Can I somehow deliberately trigger
> "kernel panic" (or "kernel oops")?

If you want to test the auto-reboot, try appending root=/dev/random to
the command line.
 
Old 03-15-2012, 03:55 PM
Jarry
 
Default How can I trigger kernel panic?

On 14-Mar-12 19:41, ZHANG, Le wrote:


> So my question is: Can I somehow deliberately trigger
> "kernel panic" (or "kernel oops")?

For panic, echo c > /proc/sysrq-trigger


After I issued the above mentioned command, my system
instantly "froze to death". Nothing changed on screen,
no "kernel panic" or "Ooops" screen. Just frozen...

No reaction to keyboard or mouse. No auto-reboot either.
The only thing I could do is to press "Reset". Not exactly
what I have been expecting...

Jarry

--
__________________________________________________ _____________
This mailbox accepts e-mails only from selected mailing-lists!
Everything else is considered to be spam and therefore deleted.
 
Old 03-15-2012, 04:02 PM
Michael Mol
 
Default How can I trigger kernel panic?

On Thu, Mar 15, 2012 at 12:55 PM, Jarry <mr.jarry@gmail.com> wrote:
> On 14-Mar-12 19:41, ZHANG, Le wrote:
>>
>>
>> > * *So my question is: Can I somehow deliberately trigger
>> > * *"kernel panic" (or "kernel oops")?
>>
>> For panic, echo c > /proc/sysrq-trigger
>
>
> After I issued the above mentioned command, my system
> instantly "froze to death". Nothing changed on screen,
> no "kernel panic" or "Ooops" screen. Just frozen...
>
> No reaction to keyboard or mouse. No auto-reboot either.
> The only thing I could do is to press "Reset". Not exactly
> what I have been expecting...

Were you running under X? The panic would have killed X, which
wouldn't have released control over the video hardware.

There's a SysRq sequence to get around this, but I don't remember it.

--
:wq
 
Old 03-15-2012, 06:17 PM
Mick
 
Default How can I trigger kernel panic?

On Thursday 15 Mar 2012 17:02:15 Michael Mol wrote:
> On Thu, Mar 15, 2012 at 12:55 PM, Jarry <mr.jarry@gmail.com> wrote:
> > On 14-Mar-12 19:41, ZHANG, Le wrote:
> >> > So my question is: Can I somehow deliberately trigger
> >> > "kernel panic" (or "kernel oops")?
> >>
> >> For panic, echo c > /proc/sysrq-trigger
> >
> > After I issued the above mentioned command, my system
> > instantly "froze to death". Nothing changed on screen,
> > no "kernel panic" or "Ooops" screen. Just frozen...
> >
> > No reaction to keyboard or mouse. No auto-reboot either.
> > The only thing I could do is to press "Reset". Not exactly
> > what I have been expecting...
>
> Were you running under X? The panic would have killed X, which
> wouldn't have released control over the video hardware.
>
> There's a SysRq sequence to get around this, but I don't remember it.

Ctrl+Alt+

R E I S U B

(busier in reverse)

After a E or I you should be back into a console, unless things are badly
screwed.
--
Regards,
Mick
 
Old 03-15-2012, 06:25 PM
Michael Mol
 
Default How can I trigger kernel panic?

On Thu, Mar 15, 2012 at 3:17 PM, Mick <michaelkintzios@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Thursday 15 Mar 2012 17:02:15 Michael Mol wrote:
>> On Thu, Mar 15, 2012 at 12:55 PM, Jarry <mr.jarry@gmail.com> wrote:
>> > On 14-Mar-12 19:41, ZHANG, Le wrote:
>> >> > * *So my question is: Can I somehow deliberately trigger
>> >> > * *"kernel panic" (or "kernel oops")?
>> >>
>> >> For panic, echo c > /proc/sysrq-trigger
>> >
>> > After I issued the above mentioned command, my system
>> > instantly "froze to death". Nothing changed on screen,
>> > no "kernel panic" or "Ooops" screen. Just frozen...
>> >
>> > No reaction to keyboard or mouse. No auto-reboot either.
>> > The only thing I could do is to press "Reset". Not exactly
>> > what I have been expecting...
>>
>> Were you running under X? The panic would have killed X, which
>> wouldn't have released control over the video hardware.
>>
>> There's a SysRq sequence to get around this, but I don't remember it.
>
> Ctrl+Alt+
>
> R E I S U B
>
> (busier in reverse)
>
> After a E or I you should be back into a console, unless things are badly
> screwed.

Is that Ctrl+Alt+SysRq+(R E I S U B), or is the SysRq key not actually used?



--
:wq
 
Old 03-15-2012, 06:33 PM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default How can I trigger kernel panic?

On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 15:25:43 -0400, Michael Mol wrote:

> Is that Ctrl+Alt+SysRq+(R E I S U B), or is the SysRq key not actually
> used?

Alt+SysReq+{R E I S U B}


--
Neil Bothwick

Did you know that eskimos have 17 different words for linguist?
 
Old 03-15-2012, 06:36 PM
Paul Hartman
 
Default How can I trigger kernel panic?

On Thu, Mar 15, 2012 at 2:25 PM, Michael Mol <mikemol@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Thu, Mar 15, 2012 at 3:17 PM, Mick <michaelkintzios@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Thursday 15 Mar 2012 17:02:15 Michael Mol wrote:
>>> On Thu, Mar 15, 2012 at 12:55 PM, Jarry <mr.jarry@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> > On 14-Mar-12 19:41, ZHANG, Le wrote:
>>> >> > * *So my question is: Can I somehow deliberately trigger
>>> >> > * *"kernel panic" (or "kernel oops")?
>>> >>
>>> >> For panic, echo c > /proc/sysrq-trigger
>>> >
>>> > After I issued the above mentioned command, my system
>>> > instantly "froze to death". Nothing changed on screen,
>>> > no "kernel panic" or "Ooops" screen. Just frozen...
>>> >
>>> > No reaction to keyboard or mouse. No auto-reboot either.
>>> > The only thing I could do is to press "Reset". Not exactly
>>> > what I have been expecting...
>>>
>>> Were you running under X? The panic would have killed X, which
>>> wouldn't have released control over the video hardware.
>>>
>>> There's a SysRq sequence to get around this, but I don't remember it.
>>
>> Ctrl+Alt+
>>
>> R E I S U B
>>
>> (busier in reverse)
>>
>> After a E or I you should be back into a console, unless things are badly
>> screwed.
>
> Is that Ctrl+Alt+SysRq+(R E I S U B), or is the SysRq key not actually used?

Sysrq is definitely required Ctrl, on the other hand, is optional.
And AltGr may be substituted for Alt.
 
Old 03-15-2012, 06:43 PM
Mick
 
Default How can I trigger kernel panic?

On Thursday 15 Mar 2012 19:36:16 Paul Hartman wrote:
> On Thu, Mar 15, 2012 at 2:25 PM, Michael Mol <mikemol@gmail.com> wrote:
> > On Thu, Mar 15, 2012 at 3:17 PM, Mick <michaelkintzios@gmail.com> wrote:
> >> On Thursday 15 Mar 2012 17:02:15 Michael Mol wrote:
> >>> On Thu, Mar 15, 2012 at 12:55 PM, Jarry <mr.jarry@gmail.com> wrote:
> >>> > On 14-Mar-12 19:41, ZHANG, Le wrote:
> >>> >> > So my question is: Can I somehow deliberately trigger
> >>> >> > "kernel panic" (or "kernel oops")?
> >>> >>
> >>> >> For panic, echo c > /proc/sysrq-trigger
> >>> >
> >>> > After I issued the above mentioned command, my system
> >>> > instantly "froze to death". Nothing changed on screen,
> >>> > no "kernel panic" or "Ooops" screen. Just frozen...
> >>> >
> >>> > No reaction to keyboard or mouse. No auto-reboot either.
> >>> > The only thing I could do is to press "Reset". Not exactly
> >>> > what I have been expecting...
> >>>
> >>> Were you running under X? The panic would have killed X, which
> >>> wouldn't have released control over the video hardware.
> >>>
> >>> There's a SysRq sequence to get around this, but I don't remember it.
> >>
> >> Ctrl+Alt+
> >>
> >> R E I S U B
> >>
> >> (busier in reverse)
> >>
> >> After a E or I you should be back into a console, unless things are
> >> badly screwed.
> >
> > Is that Ctrl+Alt+SysRq+(R E I S U B), or is the SysRq key not actually
> > used?
>
> Sysrq is definitely required Ctrl, on the other hand, is optional.
> And AltGr may be substituted for Alt.

Oops! yes, I meant to write SysRq ... sorry!
--
Regards,
Mick
 

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