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Old 02-28-2012, 11:50 AM
trevor donahue
 
Default Freeing up disk space problem!!

wow that was fast!!!!thanks a lot guys!
done some research, turns out in home there is a .cache and the folder chromium there takes nearly 600mb, cleared chromium browsing / download history, cleared the cache. that freed it.


Nikos Chantziaras, thanks, will test it tonight


YoYo Siska,*thanks for the good idea, put -doc in make.conf and "nodoc" in FEATURES
On Tue, Feb 28, 2012 at 12:24 PM, YoYo Siska <yoyo@gl.ksp.sk> wrote:

On Tue, Feb 28, 2012 at 11:37:44AM +0000, trevor donahue wrote:

> Hi everyone,

> I'm experiencing a major problem right now. I've been using gentoo for

> several months now and I simply lllooove it!

> So here's the thing. When I use gentoo for a long time, even without

> updating the current pack of installed software (emerge -uD world), I am

> left without disk space... In situations like this I start deleting

> /var/tmp/*, /tmp/*, /usr/portage/distfiles/*, maybe do even a

> revdep-rebuild to fix something, but even then I'm left with no more then

> 100 mb, which obviously is not enough ...

> So this time I googled a bit and I deleted all the /usr/share/doc/ and this

> left me with 2.5 gb of space (wow).



My usual suspect for disk space in /usr/share/doc is kdelibs, with the

doc use flag turned on it installs the whole kde api documentation,

which takes a lot of space ... *so I either set -doc for

kde-base/kdelibs, or just set -doc globally and just enable it for

things i now I might need... (note that that won't remove all of the

/usr/share/doc dirs / files, but removes most of the large ones...)





yoyo





>

> So the questions are ... in cases like this, what should be done? what is

> storing this much space? logs?
 
Old 02-28-2012, 12:01 PM
Alex Schuster
 
Default Freeing up disk space problem!!

trevor donahue writes:

> So here's the thing. When I use gentoo for a long time, even without
> updating the current pack of installed software (emerge -uD world), I am
> left without disk space... In situations like this I start deleting
> /var/tmp/*, /tmp/*, /usr/portage/distfiles/*, maybe do even a
> revdep-rebuild to fix something, but even then I'm left with no more
> then 100 mb, which obviously is not enough ...

Use eclean-dist and eclean-pkg (in app-portage/gentoolkit) to delete your
distfiles.

If you instantly need more space, reduce the amount of reserved space for
the superuser, which is 5% as default:
tune2fs -m 2 /dev/your/partition
Don't reduce it to 0, the lower this value is, the more fragmentation you
will get.

> So this time I googled a bit and I deleted all the /usr/share/doc/ and
> this left me with 2.5 gb of space (wow).
>
> So the questions are ... in cases like this, what should be done? what
> is storing this much space? logs?

You need to find out for yourself. I sometimes simply do a du -mx
--max-depth=1 / to see which directory has what amount of data in it.
Repeat for interesting directories like /usr/share/doc, and you will see
what takes big space. Add a '| sort -n' to get sorted output. Or better
use sys-fs/ncdu which is interactive.

If you prefer something graphical, there are many alternatives:

Baobab in gnome-extra/gnome-utils
kde-base/filelight
k4dirstat in kde-misc/kdirstat
Konqueror -> View -> View Mode -> File Size View (or something like that
in English)
jdiskreport in sys-fs/jdiskreport-bin

Wonko
 
Old 02-28-2012, 12:25 PM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default Freeing up disk space problem!!

On Tue, 28 Feb 2012 12:50:02 +0000, trevor donahue wrote:

> YoYo Siska, thanks for the good idea, put -doc in make.conf and "nodoc"
> in FEATURES

You may want to reconsider the latter. The doc USE flag controls extra
documentation, such as API stuff, while still installing man ages etc.
FEATURES=nodoc gets rid of everything.


--
Neil Bothwick

Ultimate memory manager; Windows, it manages to use it all..
 
Old 02-28-2012, 12:27 PM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default Freeing up disk space problem!!

On Tue, 28 Feb 2012 14:01:50 +0100, Alex Schuster wrote:

> If you instantly need more space, reduce the amount of reserved space
> for the superuser, which is 5% as default:
> tune2fs -m 2 /dev/your/partition
> Don't reduce it to 0, the lower this value is, the more fragmentation
> you will get.

Why is that? I would have expected more usable space to reduce the need
for fragmentation. I routinely use 0 on non-system filesystems.


--
Neil Bothwick

The dark ages were caused by the Y1K problem.
 
Old 02-28-2012, 12:37 PM
William Kenworthy
 
Default Freeing up disk space problem!!

On Tue, 2012-02-28 at 13:52 +0200, Alan McKinnon wrote:
> On Tue, 28 Feb 2012 11:37:44 +0000
> trevor donahue <donahue.trevor@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Hi everyone,
> > I'm experiencing a major problem right now. I've been using gentoo for
> > several months now and I simply lllooove it!
> > So here's the thing. When I use gentoo for a long time, even without
> > updating the current pack of installed software (emerge -uD world), I
> > am left without disk space... In situations like this I start deleting
> > /var/tmp/*, /tmp/*, /usr/portage/distfiles/*, maybe do even a
> > revdep-rebuild to fix something, but even then I'm left with no more
> > then 100 mb, which obviously is not enough ...
> > So this time I googled a bit and I deleted all the /usr/share/doc/
> > and this left me with 2.5 gb of space (wow).
> >
> > So the questions are ... in cases like this, what should be done?
> > what is storing this much space? logs?
>
> The thing that is taking up your space is whatever is making big files
> or lots of files.
>
> Now that could be anything, you will have to look on your machine
> yourself and tell us what it is.
>
> Start here:
>
> du -sh /*
>
> Start with the biggest directory and recursively go deeper down into
> the structure till you find the major space hogs.
>
> Logs is one option, and a likely one. But by no means the only
> possibility. So just run du and find what it is on *your* box.
>
>
>

or "du|sort -rn|less"

hogs are at the top ...

BillK
 
Old 02-28-2012, 03:14 PM
James Broadhead
 
Default Freeing up disk space problem!!

On 28 February 2012 11:37, trevor donahue <donahue.trevor@gmail.com> wrote:
> In situations like this I start deleting
> /var/tmp/*, /tmp/*, /usr/portage/distfiles/*, maybe do even a revdep-rebuild
> to fix something, but even then I'm left with no more then 100 mb, which
> obviously is not enough ...

Lots of good advice already, but I thought that I'd chime in to
suggest that you use `eclean` to free up space in distfiles, but only
removing downloaded files which aren't going to be used again. This
means that you don't need to re-download if you re-merge, and lightens
server load.

Another obvious suggestion: unless you're on a very constrained
system, consider re-partitioning to give yourself more root space -- I
very happily ran gentoo inside ~7 GiB for a very long time without
needing to shuffle things about. I recently bought one of these and a
16GiB SD card to quickly add space to my HTPC without disassembly (and
warranty-voiding).
http://www.dealextreme.com/p/kawau-world-s-smallest-microsd-transflash-tf-sd-sdhc-usb-2-0-card-reader-keychain-25558
 
Old 02-28-2012, 10:25 PM
Alex Schuster
 
Default Freeing up disk space problem!!

Neil Bothwick writes:

> On Tue, 28 Feb 2012 14:01:50 +0100, Alex Schuster wrote:
>
> > If you instantly need more space, reduce the amount of reserved space
> > for the superuser, which is 5% as default:
> > tune2fs -m 2 /dev/your/partition
> > Don't reduce it to 0, the lower this value is, the more fragmentation
> > you will get.
>
> Why is that? I would have expected more usable space to reduce the need
> for fragmentation. I routinely use 0 on non-system filesystems.

I read this often, and to me it seems to make sense. When a file system
is nearly full, writing a last big file will make the file being
cluttered along all those tiny places where some free space is still
left. And this probably already happens to some extent before the
filesystem is completely full.

Now, which values for reserved percentage are good, I don't know.
This probably depends much on the typical size of files on that partition,
and usage patterns. For large movies on your data partition, it probably
does not matter, but for my system partitions (/root, /usr, /var, /tmp,
portage stuff) I just keep it at 5%.

With the benefit that I can instantly free some space in /var when it's
just become full, without needing to decide what to delete. Okay, in
practice this does not matter much because resizing the LVM and resizing
the FS is also a matter of seconds only.

Wonko
 
Old 02-28-2012, 11:32 PM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default Freeing up disk space problem!!

On Wed, 29 Feb 2012 00:25:00 +0100, Alex Schuster wrote:

> > > Don't reduce it to 0, the lower this value is, the more
> > > fragmentation you will get.
> >
> > Why is that? I would have expected more usable space to reduce the
> > need for fragmentation. I routinely use 0 on non-system filesystems.
>
> I read this often, and to me it seems to make sense. When a file system
> is nearly full, writing a last big file will make the file being
> cluttered along all those tiny places where some free space is still
> left. And this probably already happens to some extent before the
> filesystem is completely full.

But if you set m > 0, the filesystem will become full sooner, so
fragmentation will begin sooner (for non-root processes).


--
Neil Bothwick

Did you hear about the blind prostitute? You have to hand it to her.
 
Old 02-28-2012, 11:48 PM
Dale
 
Default Freeing up disk space problem!!

Alex Schuster wrote:

> If you instantly need more space, reduce the amount of reserved space for
> the superuser, which is 5% as default:
> tune2fs -m 2 /dev/your/partition
> Don't reduce it to 0, the lower this value is, the more fragmentation you
> will get.
>

I have a question on this. I have a drive that I use for movies and
such. There is nothing OS related on that drive. Would it be safe to
set this to say 1% or even 0? Also, it is already set up with LVM and
ext4. Can I change it even while there is data on there? I ask because
I don't want to change it and find out my collection is gone. o_O

Thanks.

Dale

:-) :-)


--
I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or
how you interpreted my words!

Miss the compile output? Hint:
EMERGE_DEFAULT_OPTS="--quiet-build=n"
 
Old 02-29-2012, 12:01 AM
Alex Schuster
 
Default Freeing up disk space problem!!

Dale writes:

> Alex Schuster wrote:
>
> > If you instantly need more space, reduce the amount of reserved space
> > for the superuser, which is 5% as default:
> > tune2fs -m 2 /dev/your/partition
> > Don't reduce it to 0, the lower this value is, the more fragmentation
> > you will get.
>
> I have a question on this. I have a drive that I use for movies and
> such. There is nothing OS related on that drive. Would it be safe to
> set this to say 1% or even 0?

I'd say 1% is okay. For 0% I'm not sure, I avoid that, but maybe there
will be no noticeable difference at all.

> Also, it is already set up with LVM and
> ext4. Can I change it even while there is data on there?

Sure! Cool, isn't it. Just call lvresize -L +1G /dev/mapper/whatever or
something, and then resize2fs /dev/mapper/whatever.

> I ask because I don't want to change it and find out my collection is
> gone. o_O

Of course, backups are always a good idea, but this is pretty safe. I
wouldn't worry about it.

Wonko
 

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