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Old 04-02-2008, 07:19 PM
Dale
 
Default Emergency shutdown, how to?

Volker Armin Hemmann wrote:

On Mittwoch, 2. April 2008, Steven Lembark wrote:


Liviu Andronic wrote:
> On Fri, Mar 28, 2008 at 10:07 AM, Dale <dalek1967@bellsouth.net> wrote:
>>> By the way the safest and recommended command, although a bit longish
>>> should be ALT+SysRq(or print)+S(ync)+U(mount)+B(Reboot).
>>
>> Since I wanted to shutdown instead of reboot, it would be ALT + SysRq
>> + S + U + O then correct?
>
> Are there any potential harms to the hardware / system in case one
> tends to abuse (i.e. use more often than necessary) of this command?
> It's so often so tempting to shut down your system fast.

Short of a serious emergency (e.g., UPS with
30-sec lag and no input power) stick with
'shutdown -fh now'. The main problem is that
you bypass the stop phase of all the app's
started up via init.d; very little short of
just hitting the reset switch or yanking the
power.



if you do it the right way, start with 'e' and 'i', all apps are cleanly
terminated/killed. So if an app does not quit cleanly, it is broken.


The correct sequence is: e,i,u,b/o and it is absolutly save.




Folks, keep in mind why I asked this question in the first place. My
power supply was frying and I needed a VERY fast shutdown. This was not
asked as a fast way to shutdown just because we are impatient or
something. This was for the event of a serious emergency where I needed
a shutdown in just a very few seconds not a minute or two. Some of my
services take a while to stop, foldingathome being the longest one.


Basically, this is not intended to be used to shutdown a puter on a
regular basis, unless you burn out P/S's on a daily basis. O-o


Just didn't want someone to be using this on a regular basis and then
wondering why their system has a new nickname, FUBAR. :'(


Dale

:-) :-)
--

gentoo-user@lists.gentoo.org mailing list
 
Old 04-02-2008, 07:57 PM
"Mark Knecht"
 
Default Emergency shutdown, how to?

On Wed, Apr 2, 2008 at 12:19 PM, Dale <dalek1967@bellsouth.net> wrote:
>
> Volker Armin Hemmann wrote:
>
> > On Mittwoch, 2. April 2008, Steven Lembark wrote:
> >
> >
> > > Liviu Andronic wrote:
> > > > On Fri, Mar 28, 2008 at 10:07 AM, Dale <dalek1967@bellsouth.net>
> wrote:
> > > >>> By the way the safest and recommended command, although a bit
> longish
> > > >>> should be ALT+SysRq(or print)+S(ync)+U(mount)+B(Reboot).
> > > >>
> > > >> Since I wanted to shutdown instead of reboot, it would be ALT +
> SysRq
> > > >> + S + U + O then correct?
> > > >
> > > > Are there any potential harms to the hardware / system in case one
> > > > tends to abuse (i.e. use more often than necessary) of this command?
> > > > It's so often so tempting to shut down your system fast.
> > >
> > > Short of a serious emergency (e.g., UPS with
> > > 30-sec lag and no input power) stick with
> > > 'shutdown -fh now'. The main problem is that
> > > you bypass the stop phase of all the app's
> > > started up via init.d; very little short of
> > > just hitting the reset switch or yanking the
> > > power.
> > >
> > >
> >
> > if you do it the right way, start with 'e' and 'i', all apps are cleanly
> terminated/killed. So if an app does not quit cleanly, it is broken.
> >
> > The correct sequence is: e,i,u,b/o and it is absolutly save.
> >
> >
>
>
> Folks, keep in mind why I asked this question in the first place. My power
> supply was frying and I needed a VERY fast shutdown. This was not asked as
> a fast way to shutdown just because we are impatient or something. This was
> for the event of a serious emergency where I needed a shutdown in just a
> very few seconds not a minute or two. Some of my services take a while to
> stop, foldingathome being the longest one.
>
> Basically, this is not intended to be used to shutdown a puter on a regular
> basis, unless you burn out P/S's on a daily basis. O-o
>
> Just didn't want someone to be using this on a regular basis and then
> wondering why their system has a new nickname, FUBAR. :'(
>
> Dale
>
> :-) :-)
>

Understood. I think it sort of morphed into something more general,
like what to do when the rest of us run into the occasional problem we
all run into. Yesterday our MythTV backend server crashed 4 times. It
hung completely killing X, etc. and I was in need of a good way to
bring the machine down. I found this topic both timely and helpful, at
least for future problems.

Cheers,
Mark
--
gentoo-user@lists.gentoo.org mailing list
 
Old 04-02-2008, 07:59 PM
Volker Armin Hemmann
 
Default Emergency shutdown, how to?

On Mittwoch, 2. April 2008, Dale wrote:
> Volker Armin Hemmann wrote:
> > On Mittwoch, 2. April 2008, Steven Lembark wrote:
> >> Liviu Andronic wrote:
> >> > On Fri, Mar 28, 2008 at 10:07 AM, Dale <dalek1967@bellsouth.net>
wrote:
> >> >>> By the way the safest and recommended command, although a bit
> >> >>> longish should be ALT+SysRq(or print)+S(ync)+U(mount)+B(Reboot).
> >> >>
> >> >> Since I wanted to shutdown instead of reboot, it would be ALT +
> >> >> SysRq + S + U + O then correct?
> >> >
> >> > Are there any potential harms to the hardware / system in case one
> >> > tends to abuse (i.e. use more often than necessary) of this command?
> >> > It's so often so tempting to shut down your system fast.
> >>
> >> Short of a serious emergency (e.g., UPS with
> >> 30-sec lag and no input power) stick with
> >> 'shutdown -fh now'. The main problem is that
> >> you bypass the stop phase of all the app's
> >> started up via init.d; very little short of
> >> just hitting the reset switch or yanking the
> >> power.
> >
> > if you do it the right way, start with 'e' and 'i', all apps are cleanly
> > terminated/killed. So if an app does not quit cleanly, it is broken.
> >
> > The correct sequence is: e,i,u,b/o and it is absolutly save.
>
> Folks, keep in mind why I asked this question in the first place. My
> power supply was frying and I needed a VERY fast shutdown. This was not
> asked as a fast way to shutdown just because we are impatient or
> something. This was for the event of a serious emergency where I needed
> a shutdown in just a very few seconds not a minute or two. Some of my
> services take a while to stop, foldingathome being the longest one.
>
> Basically, this is not intended to be used to shutdown a puter on a
> regular basis, unless you burn out P/S's on a daily basis. O-o
>
> Just didn't want someone to be using this on a regular basis and then
> wondering why their system has a new nickname, FUBAR. :'(
>
> Dale
>
> :-) :-)

even in an emergency, e,i,u,b/o is the right thing to do. Just don't wait
after the e and follow it directly by the i.
--
gentoo-user@lists.gentoo.org mailing list
 
Old 04-02-2008, 08:58 PM
darren kirby
 
Default Emergency shutdown, how to?

quoth the Neil Bothwick:
> On Wed, 2 Apr 2008 16:28:29 +0200, Dirk Heinrichs wrote:
> > But nobody proposed _not_ to run ALT + SysRq + U, Neil even proposed
> > ALT + SysRq + EISUB, to be sure everything is killed, sync'd and
> > unmounted.
>
> Just don't try to do E or I over an SSH connection. It kills the SSH
> daemon and you can't reboot the box. You can guess how I learned that
> one

Ha. Hopefully the machine wasn't too far away physically.

-d
--
darren kirby :: Part of the problem since 1976 :: http://badcomputer.org
"...the number of UNIX installations has grown to 10, with more expected..."
- Dennis Ritchie and Ken Thompson, June 1972
--
gentoo-user@lists.gentoo.org mailing list
 
Old 04-02-2008, 09:42 PM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default Emergency shutdown, how to?

On Wed, 2 Apr 2008 12:57:21 -0700, Mark Knecht wrote:

> Yesterday our MythTV backend server crashed 4 times. It
> hung completely killing X, etc. and I was in need of a good way to
> bring the machine down.

You have X and a keyboard on your MythTV backend? There's no way I could
shut mine down quickly, first I have to get the ladder to get into the
loft...


--
Neil Bothwick

Stop tagline theft! Copyright your tagline (c)
 
Old 04-02-2008, 09:43 PM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default Emergency shutdown, how to?

On Wed, 02 Apr 2008 14:19:36 -0500, Dale wrote:

> Folks, keep in mind why I asked this question in the first place. My
> power supply was frying and I needed a VERY fast shutdown.

I'd shutdown and stay shutdown until I could replace the PSU. PSUs are
cheap, the components a dying one can take with it are not


--
Neil Bothwick

What is a "free" gift ? Aren't all gifts free?
 
Old 04-02-2008, 09:56 PM
Dale
 
Default Emergency shutdown, how to?

Neil Bothwick wrote:

On Wed, 02 Apr 2008 14:19:36 -0500, Dale wrote:


Folks, keep in mind why I asked this question in the first place. My
power supply was frying and I needed a VERY fast shutdown.



I'd shutdown and stay shutdown until I could replace the PSU. PSUs are
cheap, the components a dying one can take with it are not





Well, the P/S went out right when it was unmounting at the very end of
the shutdown process. I had one file system that it had to replay a few
things when I rebooted. It was a close call since the file systems that
wasn't unmounted was not a critical one.


I did replace the P/S with a new one tho. After getting the rubber band
off the fan, I did check to see if it would boot up but it just sat
there. I took it back apart and one of the transistors had a burnt
spot, actually, it was a diode. Since when those things burn out they
are basically not repairable, I just got a new one locally. I plan to
get a permanent replacement from newegg soon. The P/S I have right now
is a A-Open or something. It was all they had. I did notice that the 5
volt rail is higher than the other P/S's I have had before tho. This
one is at 4.97 volts where it is usually 4.91 or something.


You are right about burning out other components tho. I have had two
P/S's to burn out in this one rig. So far, nothing else hurt. I have
some good luck I guess.


Dale

:-) :-)
--

gentoo-user@lists.gentoo.org mailing list
 
Old 04-02-2008, 10:24 PM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default Emergency shutdown, how to?

On Wed, 02 Apr 2008 14:58:22 -0600, darren kirby wrote:

> > Just don't try to do E or I over an SSH connection. It kills the SSH
> > daemon and you can't reboot the box. You can guess how I learned that
> > one
>
> Ha. Hopefully the machine wasn't too far away physically.

Yards, fortunately


--
Neil Bothwick

"Bother," said Pooh, as Christopher Robin shut the washing machine door.
 
Old 04-03-2008, 02:35 AM
Hal Martin
 
Default Emergency shutdown, how to?

Dale wrote:
> Neil Bothwick wrote:
>> On Wed, 02 Apr 2008 14:19:36 -0500, Dale wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Folks, keep in mind why I asked this question in the first place.
>>> My power supply was frying and I needed a VERY fast shutdown.
>>>
>>
>> I'd shutdown and stay shutdown until I could replace the PSU. PSUs are
>> cheap, the components a dying one can take with it are not
>>
>>
>>
>
> Well, the P/S went out right when it was unmounting at the very end of
> the shutdown process. I had one file system that it had to replay a
> few things when I rebooted. It was a close call since the file
> systems that wasn't unmounted was not a critical one.
I can no longer contain my curiosity. How did you know it was frying?
Smell, smoke? Normally, when something like that fails, it will fail too
quickly for you to do anything about it.
>
> I did replace the P/S with a new one tho. After getting the rubber
> band off the fan, I did check to see if it would boot up but it just
> sat there. I took it back apart and one of the transistors had a
> burnt spot, actually, it was a diode. Since when those things burn
> out they are basically not repairable, I just got a new one locally.
> I plan to get a permanent replacement from newegg soon. The P/S I
> have right now is a A-Open or something. It was all they had. I did
> notice that the 5 volt rail is higher than the other P/S's I have had
> before tho. This one is at 4.97 volts where it is usually 4.91 or
> something.
Ah yes, the old dead fan problem... that's why I keep a can of
compressed air near my desk, and if not that, a pair of full lungs. ;-)

A low quality PSU shouldn't be too bad, for the time being. However, I
wouldn't recommend running on one for longer than necessary. I've had
friends who trusted case PSUs a little too much, and paid the price.
>
> You are right about burning out other components tho. I have had two
> P/S's to burn out in this one rig. So far, nothing else hurt. I have
> some good luck I guess.
Sounds like it. Hey, can I borrow some of that luck? You'll get it back
in *almost* mint condition.
>
> Dale
>
-Hal
> :-) :-)

--
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