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Old 04-01-2008, 01:23 PM
"fei huang"
 
Default vmware virtual disk expanded but invisible in VM

I've got a mini gentoo in vmware for coding, and the "/" becomes full,* I used* vmware-vdiskmanager* and expaned the virutal disk with no problem,

however, the VM is totally unware of the new free space, neither "fdisk" nor "parted", I've got no idea about this,* almost all articles googled are


about windows and partition magic which make no sense to me, any hints please?** thanks a lot~~


regards
fei
 
Old 04-01-2008, 01:55 PM
"fei huang"
 
Default vmware virtual disk expanded but invisible in VM

On Tue, Apr 1, 2008 at 9:30 PM, William Kenworthy <billk@iinet.net.au> wrote:

You have extended the partition, but the file system inside still ends

at the old boundary. *You will need to resize it - reiserfs can do it (I

know because I do this a couple of times a year , so I presume that

other, lesser file systems can also do it.


thank you for the reply, actually I've heard about this solution, and tried to use
resize2fs to expand my filesystem (ext3), the problem is I didn't know how to use
it, what does the "new size" parameter mean? the additional size or the new complete

size?* and the device must be a partition rather than the whole disk, otherwise,
it complains "Bad magic number in super-block", and for a partition, it complains size
not match or too large. any ideas?


tks

fei




BillK





On Tue, 2008-04-01 at 21:23 +0800, fei huang wrote:

> I've got a mini gentoo in vmware for coding, and the "/" becomes full,

> I used *vmware-vdiskmanager *and expaned the virutal disk with no

> problem,

>

> however, the VM is totally unware of the new free space, neither

> "fdisk" nor "parted", I've got no idea about this, *almost all

> articles googled are

>

> about windows and partition magic which make no sense to me, any hints

> please? * thanks a lot~~

>

>

> regards

> fei

>

>

>

>

--

William Kenworthy <billk@iinet.net.au>

Home in Perth!

--

gentoo-user@lists.gentoo.org mailing list
 
Old 04-01-2008, 06:13 PM
Alan McKinnon
 
Default vmware virtual disk expanded but invisible in VM

On Tuesday 01 April 2008, fei huang wrote:
> thank you for the reply, actually I've heard about this solution, and
> tried to use resize2fs to expand my filesystem (ext3), the problem is
> I didn't know how to use it, what does the "new size" parameter mean?
> the additional size or the new complete size?* and the device must be
> a partition rather than the whole disk, otherwise, it complains "Bad
> magic number in super-block", and for a partition, it complains size
> not match or too large. any ideas?

You have to resize the "thing" on which the filesystem resides. In other
words, this is the first parameter you would supply when mounting it.
If your filesystem is a whole disk, then you resize the disk. If it's a
partition, then supply the partition device node as parameter. Similar
with LVM volumes, raid volumes or whatever other gadget your filesystem
is on.

resize2fs is quite smart, if you don't supply a size, it expands the
filesystem to take up the entire device. Let's say the filesystem is
on /dev/sda3, you would then just do:

resize2fs /dev/sda3

Don't worry about unmounting the device or anything like that, growing a
filesystem can be done live and on-line

--
Alan McKinnon
alan dot mckinnon at gmail dot com

--
gentoo-user@lists.gentoo.org mailing list
 
Old 04-02-2008, 02:57 AM
"fei huang"
 
Default vmware virtual disk expanded but invisible in VM

On Wed, Apr 2, 2008 at 2:13 AM, Alan McKinnon <alan.mckinnon@gmail.com> wrote:

On Tuesday 01 April 2008, fei huang wrote:

> thank you for the reply, actually I've heard about this solution, and

> tried to use resize2fs to expand my filesystem (ext3), the problem is

> I didn't know how to use it, what does the "new size" parameter mean?

> the additional size or the new complete size?* and the device must be

> a partition rather than the whole disk, otherwise, it complains "Bad

> magic number in super-block", and for a partition, it complains size

> not match or too large. any ideas?



You have to resize the "thing" on which the filesystem resides. In other

words, this is the first parameter you would supply when mounting it.

If your filesystem is a whole disk, then you resize the disk. If it's a

partition, then supply the partition device node as parameter. Similar

with LVM volumes, raid volumes or whatever other gadget your filesystem

is on.



resize2fs is quite smart, if you don't supply a size, it expands the

filesystem to take up the entire device. Let's say the filesystem is

on /dev/sda3, you would then just do:



resize2fs /dev/sda3



Don't worry about unmounting the device or anything like that, growing a

filesystem can be done live and on-line


I think this probably only works in the case that the raw free space is phyically located beside the specified partition, imagine there are sda1, sda2 in sequence, when new space
available, resize only possible to sda2, and with a disk with 4 primary partitions, this won't help either..* am I* right?** ~*


resize didn't work for me, I backup my data, and recreated the partition with a new size, old way but make more sense to me. thanks so much, I'll try it later in another VM in my office.

regards
fei




--

Alan McKinnon

alan dot mckinnon at gmail dot com



--

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Old 04-02-2008, 05:23 AM
Alan McKinnon
 
Default vmware virtual disk expanded but invisible in VM

On Wednesday 02 April 2008, fei huang wrote:
> I think this probably only works in the case that the raw free space
> is phyically located beside the specified partition, imagine there
> are sda1, sda2 in sequence, when new space available, resize only
> possible to sda2, and with a disk with 4 primary partitions, this
> won't help either..* am I* right?** ~

Correct. This is reason 1 of many that LVM should always be used.

--
Alan McKinnon
alan dot mckinnon at gmail dot com

--
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Old 04-02-2008, 07:35 AM
Stroller
 
Default vmware virtual disk expanded but invisible in VM

On 2 Apr 2008, at 06:23, Alan McKinnon wrote:

...
This is reason 1 of many that LVM should always be used.


lol!

Stroller.
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