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Old 12-28-2011, 01:28 AM
Adam Carter
 
Default Sharing /home and swap

>. Is there anything in my
> current Gentoo /home and swap that "locks" them to the Gentoo install or can
> I share them between the two installs?

No. As long as SUSE supports the file system on /home you're using in
Gentoo it will work fine, and that's very likely. When you're booted
into SUSE, run cat /proc/filesystems to see what it supports. If your
Gentoo /home file system is not there, you may need to load the
module, eg. on this system;
# grep ext /proc/filesystems
ext2
ext4
# modprobe ext3
# grep ext /proc/filesystems
ext2
ext4
ext3
 
Old 12-28-2011, 01:32 AM
Andrew Lowe
 
Default Sharing /home and swap

On 28/12/2011 10:28 AM, Adam Carter wrote:

. Is there anything in my
current Gentoo /home and swap that "locks" them to the Gentoo install or can
I share them between the two installs?


No. As long as SUSE supports the file system on /home you're using in
Gentoo it will work fine, and that's very likely. When you're booted
into SUSE, run cat /proc/filesystems to see what it supports. If your
Gentoo /home file system is not there, you may need to load the
module, eg. on this system;
# grep ext /proc/filesystems
ext2
ext4
# modprobe ext3
# grep ext /proc/filesystems
ext2
ext4
ext3




Good, thanks for that.

Andrew
 
Old 12-28-2011, 01:37 AM
Nilesh Govindarajan
 
Default Sharing /home and swap

On Dec 28, 2011 7:52 AM, "Andrew Lowe" <agl@wht.com.au> wrote:

>

> Hi all,

> * * * *I usually use Gentoo as my "normal" Linux but a third party app I'm about to start using only runs on SUSE. To this end, I'm about to set aside a smaller partition and install the minimal amnount of SUSE I need to run the app. My question is regarding /home and swap. Is there anything in my current Gentoo /home and swap that "locks" them to the Gentoo install or can I share them between the two installs? What I mean by share is that when I boot up Gentoo can I mount /home and swap and everything is fully accessible and then reboot into SUSE and once again mount them and everything is once again fully accessible?


>

> * * * *I'm not doing anything "snazzy" such as LVM or encryption, just bog standard Linux. Any thoughts greatly appreciated.

>

> * * * *Regards,

> * * * * * * * *Andrew

>

Another important factor is desktop environment. Various settings can cause troubles in either ones.
 
Old 12-28-2011, 01:44 AM
Nikos Chantziaras
 
Default Sharing /home and swap

On 12/28/2011 04:21 AM, Andrew Lowe wrote:

Hi all,
I usually use Gentoo as my "normal" Linux but a third party app I'm
about to start using only runs on SUSE. To this end, I'm about to set
aside a smaller partition and install the minimal amnount of SUSE I need
to run the app. My question is regarding /home and swap. Is there
anything in my current Gentoo /home and swap that "locks" them to the
Gentoo install or can I share them between the two installs? What I mean
by share is that when I boot up Gentoo can I mount /home and swap and
everything is fully accessible and then reboot into SUSE and once again
mount them and everything is once again fully accessible?


At a low level, only swap can't be shared 100% due to suspend to disk.
If you are not using suspend to disk, then you can share swap without
any problems. But if you suspend one OS and then boot into the other,
the suspend data is going to be corrupted. At best you'll crash when
trying to resume, at worst you'll resume OK but will get corrupted data.


At the OS level, /home can be shared without problems. At the
application level (and I'm talking about KDE, Gnome and other DEs here),
you could get bugs or weird behavior due to using different versions of
the same DE.
 
Old 12-28-2011, 01:46 AM
Peter Humphrey
 
Default Sharing /home and swap

On Wednesday 28 December 2011 02:21:25 Andrew Lowe wrote:

*

> Is there anything in my current Gentoo /home and swap that "locks" them to

> the Gentoo install or can I share them between the two installs?

*

Beware! Whichever your preferred desktop (kde, gnome, whatever), having your whole home directory shared between distros is a recipe for disaster. You only need one program to differ in version number between distros to render the whole lot unusable. Consider, for instance, the current difficulty of incompatible versions of kmail between 4.4 and 4.7.

*

My preference is to have a /home/<user>/common partition mounted in each distro, containing everything I want accessible at all times, but leave things like .kde4 dedicated to the distro that's running it.

*

--

Rgds

Peter Linux Counter 5290, 1994-04-23

*
 
Old 12-28-2011, 01:49 AM
Pandu Poluan
 
Default Sharing /home and swap

On Dec 28, 2011 9:40 AM, "Nilesh Govindarajan" <contact@nileshgr.com> wrote:

>

>

> On Dec 28, 2011 7:52 AM, "Andrew Lowe" <agl@wht.com.au> wrote:

> >

> > Hi all,

> > * * * *I usually use Gentoo as my "normal" Linux but a third party app I'm about to start using only runs on SUSE. To this end, I'm about to set aside a smaller partition and install the minimal amnount of SUSE I need to run the app. My question is regarding /home and swap. Is there anything in my current Gentoo /home and swap that "locks" them to the Gentoo install or can I share them between the two installs? What I mean by share is that when I boot up Gentoo can I mount /home and swap and everything is fully accessible and then reboot into SUSE and once again mount them and everything is once again fully accessible?


> >

> > * * * *I'm not doing anything "snazzy" such as LVM or encryption, just bog standard Linux. Any thoughts greatly appreciated.

> >

> > * * * *Regards,

> > * * * * * * * *Andrew

> >

> Another important factor is desktop environment. Various settings can cause troubles in either ones.


True.


My suggestion would be to not share your ~ directly, but instead share something *under* ~


E.g. :


mkdir ~/sharedstuff

mount /dev/sdxx ~/sharedstuff


Another alternative would be to ensure that you are not using the same username in both OS, and just do a bindmount.


Rgds,
 
Old 12-28-2011, 04:26 AM
Andrew Lowe
 
Default Sharing /home and swap

On 28/12/2011 10:49 AM, Pandu Poluan wrote:


On Dec 28, 2011 9:40 AM, "Nilesh Govindarajan" <contact@nileshgr.com
<mailto:contact@nileshgr.com>> wrote:
>
>
> On Dec 28, 2011 7:52 AM, "Andrew Lowe" <agl@wht.com.au
<mailto:agl@wht.com.au>> wrote:
> >

[snip]
...
...
...
[snip]


True.

My suggestion would be to not share your ~ directly, but instead share
something *under* ~

E.g. :

mkdir ~/sharedstuff
mount /dev/sdxx ~/sharedstuff

Another alternative would be to ensure that you are not using the same
username in both OS, and just do a bindmount.

Rgds,




People,
Thanks for the replies, I forgot about the config stuff sitting there
in the home dir. I think the way around this for me is Pandu's
suggestion of a different user name for each linux and using bind mount.


Thanks for the info,
Andrew
 
Old 12-28-2011, 04:30 AM
"W.Kenworthy"
 
Default Sharing /home and swap

If its only one app, why not use a small vm (qemu, vbox etc.)? - best of
both worlds.

Also, why only on Suse? - you can often work around differences with
ld-preload and other tricks.


BillK



-----Original Message-----
From: Andrew Lowe <agl@wht.com.au>
Reply-to: gentoo-user@lists.gentoo.org
To: gentoo-user@lists.gentoo.org
Subject: [gentoo-user] Sharing /home and swap
Date: Wed, 28 Dec 2011 10:21:25 +0800

Hi all,
I usually use Gentoo as my "normal" Linux but a third party app I'm
about to start using only runs on SUSE. To this end, I'm about to set
aside a smaller partition and install the minimal amnount of SUSE I need
to run the app. My question is regarding /home and swap. Is there
anything in my current Gentoo /home and swap that "locks" them to the
Gentoo install or can I share them between the two installs? What I mean
by share is that when I boot up Gentoo can I mount /home and swap and
everything is fully accessible and then reboot into SUSE and once again
mount them and everything is once again fully accessible?

I'm not doing anything "snazzy" such as LVM or encryption, just bog
standard Linux. Any thoughts greatly appreciated.

Regards,
Andrew
 
Old 12-28-2011, 04:37 AM
Andrew Lowe
 
Default Sharing /home and swap

On 28/12/2011 1:30 PM, W.Kenworthy wrote:

If its only one app, why not use a small vm (qemu, vbox etc.)? - best of
both worlds.


Basically because I've done nothing with these thingies and have no
experience with them and therefore didn't think of them...... Might be
worth looking into - got a link to a "20 words or less" intro?




Also, why only on Suse? - you can often work around differences with
ld-preload and other tricks.


The third party app is under development, I'm tying some stuff into it,
and things are a bit fluid at the moment. I think basically taking a
couple of hours to set something up once and that's it is quicker than
trying to work around library problems that will arise in an ongoing manner.





BillK




Andrew
 
Old 12-28-2011, 04:40 AM
Michael Mol
 
Default Sharing /home and swap

On Wed, Dec 28, 2011 at 12:26 AM, Andrew Lowe <agl@wht.com.au> wrote:
> On 28/12/2011 10:49 AM, Pandu Poluan wrote:
>>
>>
>> On Dec 28, 2011 9:40 AM, "Nilesh Govindarajan" <contact@nileshgr.com
>> <mailto:contact@nileshgr.com>> wrote:
>> *>
>> *>
>> *> On Dec 28, 2011 7:52 AM, "Andrew Lowe" <agl@wht.com.au
>> <mailto:agl@wht.com.au>> wrote:
>> *> >
>
> [snip]
> ...
> ...
> ...
> [snip]
>
>>
>> True.
>>
>> My suggestion would be to not share your ~ directly, but instead share
>> something *under* ~
>>
>> E.g. :
>>
>> mkdir ~/sharedstuff
>> mount /dev/sdxx ~/sharedstuff
>>
>> Another alternative would be to ensure that you are not using the same
>> username in both OS, and just do a bindmount.
>>
>> Rgds,
>>
>
>
> People,
> * * * *Thanks for the replies, I forgot about the config stuff sitting there
> in the home dir. I think the way around this for me is Pandu's suggestion of
> a different user name for each linux and using bind mount.

There's a big one nobody mentioned: Different versions of different
apps. In flipping a /home back and forth between different Linux
distributions running different versions of (mostly) the same
software, I've had apps crash. *Usually*, this happens when dotfiles
were created by newer versions of a program, and then read by an older
version, but I've seen it break going the other way, too.

The other (relatively mild) bit are UID/GID mappings for permissions.
As long as your login users and related groups in /etc/passwd and
/etc/group have the same UIDs and GIDs in both OSs, you should be just
fine. I got bit when I flipped back and forth between Fedora and
Ubuntu; Fedora started things at UID 500, Ubuntu started things at UID
1000. Files that had been created by my user account on one system
couldn't be read by my user account on the other without chowning
them.

--
:wq
 

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