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Old 12-05-2011, 09:56 AM
Gregory Shearman
 
Default pg_upgrade91 - You must have read and write access in the current directory

In linux.gentoo.user, you wrote:
> On 12/05/11 13:37, Gregory Shearman wrote:
>>In linux.gentoo.user, Joseph wrote:
>>> I'm upgrading form posgresql 9.0 to 9.1, it seem to the upgrade went OK but when try to transfer the data
>>> base:
>>> pg_upgrade91 -v --old-datadir=/var/lib/postgresql/9.0/data/ --new-datadir=/var/lib/postgresql/9.1/data
>>> --old-bindir=/usr/lib/postgresql-9.0/bin/ --new-bindir=/usr/lib/postgresql-9.1/bin/
>>> Running in verbose mode
>>> Performing Consistency Checks
>>> -----------------------------
>>> Checking current, bin, and data directories
>>> You must have read and write access in the current directory.
>>> Failure, exiting
>>>
>>> What am I doing wrong?
>>
>>Have you checked that you have read and write access in the current
>>directory before running the command?
>>
>>I did the upgrade as the "postgres" user and made sure that I ran the
>>command from a read/writable directory for that user.
>
> Yes, I did "su postgres"
> and ls -al /var/lib/postgresql/9.1/
> drwx------ 13 postgres postgres 4096 Dec 4 18:20 data
>
> so it should work.
>
> --
> Joseph

hmmm...

Which directory are you running the command from? I ran mine from
/var/lib/postgresql which has the properties:

drwxr-xr-x 4 postgres root

I don't recall using the command "pg_upgrade91", but I see that it is a
symlink to /usr/lib/postgresql-9.1/bin/pg_upgrade

This is the command that worked for me:

pg_upgrade -u postgres -d /var/lib/postgresql/9.0/data -D
/var/lib/postgresql/9.1/data -b /usr/lib/postgresql-9.0/bin -B
/usr/lib/postgresql-9.1/bin

For more information do (as postgres user)

$ pg_upgrade --help

--
Regards,
Gregory
 
Old 12-05-2011, 04:59 PM
Joseph
 
Default pg_upgrade91 - You must have read and write access in the current directory

On 12/05/11 21:56, Gregory Shearman wrote:

hmmm...

Which directory are you running the command from? I ran mine from
/var/lib/postgresql which has the properties:

drwxr-xr-x 4 postgres root

I don't recall using the command "pg_upgrade91", but I see that it is a
symlink to /usr/lib/postgresql-9.1/bin/pg_upgrade

This is the command that worked for me:

pg_upgrade -u postgres -d /var/lib/postgresql/9.0/data -D
/var/lib/postgresql/9.1/data -b /usr/lib/postgresql-9.0/bin -B
/usr/lib/postgresql-9.1/bin

For more information do (as postgres user)

$ pg_upgrade --help

--
Regards,
Gregory



I definitely wasn't in that directory I just "su postgres" and run the command.

I just recreate the databases by hand and populated them with backup data.

--
Joseph
 
Old 12-05-2011, 09:24 PM
Gregory Shearman
 
Default pg_upgrade91 - You must have read and write access in the current directory

In linux.gentoo.user, you wrote:
> On 12/05/11 21:56, Gregory Shearman wrote:
>>hmmm...
>>
>>Which directory are you running the command from? I ran mine from
>>/var/lib/postgresql which has the properties:
>>
>>drwxr-xr-x 4 postgres root
>>
>>I don't recall using the command "pg_upgrade91", but I see that it is a
>>symlink to /usr/lib/postgresql-9.1/bin/pg_upgrade
>>
>>This is the command that worked for me:
>>
>>pg_upgrade -u postgres -d /var/lib/postgresql/9.0/data -D
>>/var/lib/postgresql/9.1/data -b /usr/lib/postgresql-9.0/bin -B
>>/usr/lib/postgresql-9.1/bin
>>
>>For more information do (as postgres user)
>>
>>$ pg_upgrade --help
>>
> I definitely wasn't in that directory I just "su postgres" and run the command.
>
> I just recreate the databases by hand and populated them with backup data.

I see. That's a shame.

Usually, the HOME directory of the postgres user is set to
/var/lib/postgresql.

If you just do "su postgres" you'll remain in the directory from which
you ran the command.

What you *must* do is run:

$ su - postgres

Notice the '-'?

This makes the su to the user a *login*, so that you'll be in the HOME
directory of the postgres user.

Try it yourself. Do an 'ls' after "su postgres" and then do an 'ls'
after "su - postgres"

See "man su" for more information.

--
Regards,
Gregory.
 

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