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Old 03-18-2008, 06:02 PM
dexters84
 
Default jffs2 on gentoo

Hi

In my system I didn't bother with any of embedded file systems - I've
created 1 GB ext2 partition (journalising in ext3 increases read/write
count), and it worked just like any other hard drive. Bios detected
correct capacity - I was lucky with that, but in case where BIOS doesn't
detect CF card properly google is Your friend.

I don't have all doc I've used during setup but I remember reading this one
http://silent.gumph.org/content/4/1/011-linux-on-cf.html

regards

Stroller pisze:


On 18 Mar 2008, at 10:33, Florian Philipp wrote:

On Tue, 2008-03-18 at 01:47 +0000, Stroller wrote:

On 17 Mar 2008, at 18:10, James wrote:

...
Wear leveling is *probably* built into the IDE to CF converter
carrier board?


Almost certainly not, I'd have thought. Aren't those boards just dumb
pin-convertors? CF cards "talk" IDE.


Yes they are.

Another thought crossed my mind today: Does wear leveling work if I
create loopback devices (ext2-formatted) on FAT32?


Surely so. In this case you would be writing to the flash device's
FAT32 filessystem. It doesn't matter if you're writing a .RAW picture
file, an .iso or your loopback fs.



By the way: Why is wear leveling filesystem-dependent anyway?


No idea. Please note that in this thread I have stated that I
_understand_ wear-levelling to be filesystem-dependent - it is others
who have made replies stating this more confidently.



I would
have thought it were working on blocks (like device mapper, cryptsetup,
lvm and so on) and not on files.


Ah! But here we come back to the problem of recording how many times a
given block has been written upon, in order not to kill that block.
Most filesystems don't have to do that.


Stroller.



--
gentoo-user@lists.gentoo.org mailing list
 
Old 03-18-2008, 06:02 PM
dexters84
 
Default jffs2 on gentoo

Hi

In my system I didn't bother with any of embedded file systems - I've
created 1 GB ext2 partition (journalising in ext3 increases read/write
count), and it worked just like any other hard drive. Bios detected
correct capacity - I was lucky with that, but in case where BIOS doesn't
detect CF card properly google is Your friend.

I don't have all doc I've used during setup but I remember reading this one
http://silent.gumph.org/content/4/1/011-linux-on-cf.html

regards

Stroller pisze:


On 18 Mar 2008, at 10:33, Florian Philipp wrote:

On Tue, 2008-03-18 at 01:47 +0000, Stroller wrote:

On 17 Mar 2008, at 18:10, James wrote:

...
Wear leveling is *probably* built into the IDE to CF converter
carrier board?


Almost certainly not, I'd have thought. Aren't those boards just dumb
pin-convertors? CF cards "talk" IDE.


Yes they are.

Another thought crossed my mind today: Does wear leveling work if I
create loopback devices (ext2-formatted) on FAT32?


Surely so. In this case you would be writing to the flash device's
FAT32 filessystem. It doesn't matter if you're writing a .RAW picture
file, an .iso or your loopback fs.



By the way: Why is wear leveling filesystem-dependent anyway?


No idea. Please note that in this thread I have stated that I
_understand_ wear-levelling to be filesystem-dependent - it is others
who have made replies stating this more confidently.



I would
have thought it were working on blocks (like device mapper, cryptsetup,
lvm and so on) and not on files.


Ah! But here we come back to the problem of recording how many times a
given block has been written upon, in order not to kill that block.
Most filesystems don't have to do that.


Stroller.



--
gentoo-user@lists.gentoo.org mailing list
 

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