FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > Gentoo > Gentoo User

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 09-18-2011, 06:42 PM
Dale
 
Default Question about Chromium

András Csányi wrote:

Dear All!

I think Google Chrome/Chromium is an excellent browser and I have been
using it for a year or more. But there is one issue which is
disturbing me and I would like to know what is your experience.

If I open more than 2-3 URL fast way the loading tabs and other
already opened pages became frozen or terrible slow. I can't scrolling
the already loaded or previously loaded pages till all the tabs are
loaded. Or If I can scroll them than the scrolling is terribly slow.
My network connection is excellent so we can exclude the network
issue. On the other hand this behavior depends on how long time runs
the browser. The more is the slower. Moreover, the used memory depends
on the uptime of the browser as well. When it's reached the 1G than I
always restart the browser.

I experienced this on Linux and on Windows 7 as well. I'm using the
latest (14.x) on Linux and the dev-channel (13.x) on Windows 7.
Because of these problem I have to restart my browser once a day.

I would like to know what is your experience and what do you do to
avoid this issue?

Thanks in advance!



I run into this in Seamonkey/Firefox once in a while. Usually in my
case the page has flash or java on it and it seems to slow things down
for some reason. It acts like it can't download java or especially
flash and deal with other things at the same time.


Given how buggy flash is, I suspect flash. If you notice when you
emerge flash, it has a warning at the end of the emerge about security
problems. If they can't keep it secure, makes me question what else
ain't fixed too.


May not be related but may want to see what those pages contain. If
they do have java or especially flash, then that could be the problem.


Dale

:-) :-)
 
Old 09-18-2011, 07:56 PM
Michael Mol
 
Default Question about Chromium

On Sun, Sep 18, 2011 at 2:25 PM, András Csányi <sayusi.ando@gmail.com> wrote:
> Dear All!
>
> I think Google Chrome/Chromium is an excellent browser and I have been
> using it for a year or more. But there is one issue which is
> disturbing me and I would like to know what is your experience.
>
> If I open more than 2-3 URL fast way the loading tabs and other
> already opened pages became frozen or terrible slow. I can't scrolling
> the already loaded or previously loaded pages till all the tabs are
> loaded. Or If I can scroll them than the scrolling is terribly slow.
> My network connection is excellent so we can exclude the network
> issue. On the other hand this behavior depends on how long time runs
> the browser. The more is the slower. Moreover, the used memory depends
> on the uptime of the browser as well. When it's reached the 1G than I
> always restart the browser.
>
> I experienced this on Linux and on Windows 7 as well. I'm using the
> latest (14.x) on Linux and the dev-channel (13.x) on Windows 7.
> Because of these problem I have to restart my browser once a day.
>
> I would like to know what is your experience and what do you do to
> avoid this issue?

I believe Chrome/Chromium as an outstanding bug upstream involving
back/fwd navigation queues which lead to browser-wide slowdowns. I've
found that, from time to time, I have to close the entire browser
(merely closing all open tabs isn't enough) to get things fixed.

--
:wq
 
Old 09-19-2011, 03:52 PM
Paul Hartman
 
Default Question about Chromium

On Sun, Sep 18, 2011 at 1:25 PM, András Csányi <sayusi.ando@gmail.com> wrote:
> Dear All!
>
> I think Google Chrome/Chromium is an excellent browser and I have been
> using it for a year or more. But there is one issue which is
> disturbing me and I would like to know what is your experience.

Maybe a different problem than what you're having, but in my
experience Chromium is sensitive to DNS problems. When I use my ISP's
DNS server, Chromium regularly fails to load pages. When I use my own
local DNS resolver on my own machine, it works great...
 
Old 09-19-2011, 04:11 PM
Michael Mol
 
Default Question about Chromium

On Mon, Sep 19, 2011 at 11:52 AM, Paul Hartman
<paul.hartman+gentoo@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sun, Sep 18, 2011 at 1:25 PM, András Csányi <sayusi.ando@gmail.com> wrote:
>> Dear All!
>>
>> I think Google Chrome/Chromium is an excellent browser and I have been
>> using it for a year or more. But there is one issue which is
>> disturbing me and I would like to know what is your experience.
>
> Maybe a different problem than what you're having, but in my
> experience Chromium is sensitive to DNS problems. When I use my ISP's
> DNS server, Chromium regularly fails to load pages. When I use my own
> local DNS resolver on my own machine, it works great...

* Chrome/Chromium does not internally cache DNS results. (Firefox, by
contrast, does)
* DNS communications occur over UDP, which is very fast from the
server's perspective, but carries no guarantee of delivery. (As a
coping mechanism, DNS resolvers retry after a timeout)

So what's happening:

Chromium sends a UDP packet asking for the A (or AAAA, depending)
record of whatever site it is you want to go see.

That UDP packet makes it through your local network, and exits through
your {,cable,DSL} modem. Noise on the line results in the loss of the
UDP packet. The target DNS server never hears about the request, so
never sends a reply.

Chromium will retry after a bit. (I think the default is 30s for the
first retry)

On the other hand, if you're running a recursing DNS server on your
local network, here's what happens:

Chromium sends a UDP packet to your local DNS server, asking fo the A
(or AAAA) record of the domain in question.

That UDP packet makes it across your reliable local network to your
local caching/recursing DNS server.

Your local DNS server sends a UDP packet to an upstream DNS server,
asking for the information you wanted. If that UDP packet doesn't
reach its destination, the DNS server will try again.

Once your local DNS server receives a reply, it caches the information
for as long as the DNS records TTL indicates it should.

So what happened to Chromium's initial request? If your local DNS
server's initial query didn't manage to swim upstream, then Chromium
probably timed out. You, the user, will probably try again.

By the time you try again, your local DNS server will probably have
received and cached the response from your _first_ query, and will
have an answer for you immediately; no need to send UDP packets out
over lossy internet connection.

--
:wq
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 07:31 PM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright ©2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org