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Old 08-21-2011, 12:37 PM
Mick
 
Default Suspend to RAM caused crashes

On Sunday 21 Aug 2011 12:57:48 Pandu Poluan wrote:
> (sorry for top-posting)
>
> Do the 1 GB pieces have the same timing values as the 0.5 GB pieces?

Yes, same timing values. When I bought the 1G modules I made sure that they
were matched exactly in terms of specification with the 0.5G pieces (other
than the size).

> Try slowing down the memory timing parameters in BIOS (should look
> like 8-5-3-3 or something like that; larger numbers are slower).

I have not messed about with the memory timing jumpers at all as far as I can
recall. The timing setting is the OEM's defaults (Compaq) and there is no way
to access them in the BIOS.

memtest86+ reports:

Chipset: Intel i915P/G (ECC: Disabled) - FSB: 200MHz - Type: DDR1
Settings: RAM: 200MHz (DDR400) / CAS: 3-3-3-8 / Dual Channel (Interleaved)


PS. memtest86+ did not show any errors for 4 passes. This script did not
come up with any errors either:

http://people.redhat.com/dledford/memtest.shtml
--
Regards,
Mick
 
Old 08-21-2011, 12:53 PM
Volker Armin Hemmann
 
Default Suspend to RAM caused crashes

Am Sonntag 21 August 2011, 11:27:55 schrieb Mick:
> Here's a strange one:
>
> Suspending a Pentium4 32bit machine used to work a treat. For years. Then
> around 9 months ago or so, I can't recall exactly, it started causing
> crashes. What happens is that the monitor will go to sleep and the disk
> will stop immediately, but the machine continues to run and run and run ...
>

so try different kernel versions. Start with 3.0.3 and then go down - one
kernel per release (not all those stable releases in between) should be
enough. Then, as soon as it starts working again, you can narrow it down.

Use vanilla kernels for this.

Second, enable wake on lan - if your machine hangs while suspending, try to
kick it back to life with a wol-packet.

Third point, there are some checks and self tests among the kernel debug
options related to suspending, enable them.


For me, 3.0.1 is the first kernel ever that made it possible for me to
suspend-to-ram (with fglrx even). Suspending is a bitch, breaking and
unbreaking on an irregular basis thanks to crappy bios'.

--
#163933
 
Old 08-21-2011, 03:12 PM
Nikos Chantziaras
 
Default Suspend to RAM caused crashes

On 08/21/2011 02:19 PM, Francesco Talamona wrote:

I wish yours it's not a RAM
issue, it could be tricky to spot, because memtest is not putting any
load to the machine, so it's very useful when it reports error, but when
it doesn't you can't be sure if RAM modules are in good health.


CPU load doesn't affect RAM errors. CPU load affects CPU errors. If
you only get RAM errors during heavy load, the RAM is just fine, but
your CPU has a fault.
 
Old 08-21-2011, 03:22 PM
Volker Armin Hemmann
 
Default Suspend to RAM caused crashes

Am Sonntag 21 August 2011, 18:12:00 schrieb Nikos Chantziaras:
> On 08/21/2011 02:19 PM, Francesco Talamona wrote:
> > I wish yours it's not a RAM
> >
> > issue, it could be tricky to spot, because memtest is not putting any
> > load to the machine, so it's very useful when it reports error, but when
> > it doesn't you can't be sure if RAM modules are in good health.
>
> CPU load doesn't affect RAM errors. CPU load affects CPU errors. If
> you only get RAM errors during heavy load, the RAM is just fine, but
> your CPU has a fault.

or you have a faulty psu that is not able to deliver clean current and stable
voltages as soon as the load goes up.


--
#163933
 
Old 08-21-2011, 03:30 PM
 
Default Suspend to RAM caused crashes

Mick <michaelkintzios@gmail.com> [11-08-21 12:32]:
> Here's a strange one:
>
> Suspending a Pentium4 32bit machine used to work a treat. For years. Then
> around 9 months ago or so, I can't recall exactly, it started causing crashes.
> What happens is that the monitor will go to sleep and the disk will stop
> immediately, but the machine continues to run and run and run ...
>
> At that point I have lost access to the keyboard and the monitor does not wake
> up if I move the mouse. Using ssh to connect shows that the machine is off
> the network, so I assume that the NIC is also suspended. The only way to
> recover is to pull the plug. :-(
>
> Unfortunately, mysql has left a lock file behind, so it won't start at reboot
> until I remove the lockfile.
>
> Now, here's the strange thing about all this. I have 4 RAM modules, 2x1G and
> 2x500M. Following the manual I have installed them in this order:
>
> slot 1 - 1G,
> slot 2 - 0.5G,
> slot 3 - 1G,
> slot 4 - 0.5G
>
> If I try to suspend the machine soon after boot, when it is still using low
> amounts of memory, the machine will suspend each time without fail (just like
> it used to do in the past).
>
> If I wait until the machine is using more than 1G or so, then it will always
> crash.
>
> I'm running memtest86+ just in case, but 3 passes and no errors are shown so
> far. Suspend to RAM is really a time saver on this machine and was being used
> at least 4-5 times a day. Now the box is running non-stop 16 hours a day or
> more, which is wasteful (although with the Pentium4 I'm saving on central
> heating bills!) Any ideas what I can look into to resolve this?
> --
> Regards,
> Mick


Hi Mick,

one thing, which is able to produce any kind of error except those, which one
would exspect in a certain context, is a bad capicitor on the mobo (or
sometimes in the power supply).

If I understand your posting correctly, your PC is not the youngest
one...?

I had a motherboard, which completly fails to boot the very first
stages of the kernel boot process, but perfectly runs memtest86....
Bad capacitors...

More RAM means more power.

What happens, if you change the RAMS in such a manner:

slot 1 - 0.5G,
slot 2 - 1G,
slot 3 - 0.5G
slot 4 - 1G,

?

Does teh computer have problems after accessing slot 2 or after access
more than 1G?

Best regards,
mcc
 
Old 08-21-2011, 03:33 PM
Mark Knecht
 
Default Suspend to RAM caused crashes

On Sun, Aug 21, 2011 at 8:12 AM, Nikos Chantziaras <realnc@arcor.de> wrote:
> On 08/21/2011 02:19 PM, Francesco Talamona wrote:
>>
>> *I wish yours it's not a RAM
>> issue, it could be tricky to spot, because memtest is not putting any
>> load to the machine, so it's very useful when it reports error, but when
>> it doesn't you can't be sure if RAM modules are in good health.
>
> CPU load doesn't affect RAM errors. *CPU load affects CPU errors. *If you
> only get RAM errors during heavy load, the RAM is just fine, but your CPU
> has a fault.

Unless the CPU loading causes excessive heat and the RAM has problems
only when it gets hot.

In general semiconductor speeds slow down as temperature increases so
a RAM that's barely in spec at room temp could be out of spec at high
temp.

Just an idea.

- Mark
 
Old 08-21-2011, 03:43 PM
Nikos Chantziaras
 
Default Suspend to RAM caused crashes

On 08/21/2011 06:33 PM, Mark Knecht wrote:

On Sun, Aug 21, 2011 at 8:12 AM, Nikos Chantziaras<realnc@arcor.de> wrote:

On 08/21/2011 02:19 PM, Francesco Talamona wrote:


I wish yours it's not a RAM
issue, it could be tricky to spot, because memtest is not putting any
load to the machine, so it's very useful when it reports error, but when
it doesn't you can't be sure if RAM modules are in good health.


CPU load doesn't affect RAM errors. CPU load affects CPU errors. If you
only get RAM errors during heavy load, the RAM is just fine, but your CPU
has a fault.


Unless the CPU loading causes excessive heat and the RAM has problems
only when it gets hot.


The RAM gets hot when there's RAM load (meaning being used heavily), not
when there's CPU load :*)
 
Old 08-21-2011, 04:08 PM
Mark Knecht
 
Default Suspend to RAM caused crashes

On Sun, Aug 21, 2011 at 8:43 AM, Nikos Chantziaras <realnc@arcor.de> wrote:
> On 08/21/2011 06:33 PM, Mark Knecht wrote:
>>
>> On Sun, Aug 21, 2011 at 8:12 AM, Nikos Chantziaras<realnc@arcor.de>
>> *wrote:
>>>
>>> On 08/21/2011 02:19 PM, Francesco Talamona wrote:
>>>>
>>>> *I wish yours it's not a RAM
>>>> issue, it could be tricky to spot, because memtest is not putting any
>>>> load to the machine, so it's very useful when it reports error, but when
>>>> it doesn't you can't be sure if RAM modules are in good health.
>>>
>>> CPU load doesn't affect RAM errors. *CPU load affects CPU errors. *If you
>>> only get RAM errors during heavy load, the RAM is just fine, but your CPU
>>> has a fault.
>>
>> Unless the CPU loading causes excessive heat and the RAM has problems
>> only when it gets hot.
>
> The RAM gets hot when there's RAM load (meaning being used heavily), not
> when there's CPU load :*)

Do you feel heat when your PC is turned on and running hard? Of course
you do. The whole machine heats up. The CPU under load heats the
machine so the RAM and drives and everything else heats up also. Not
as hot as the CPU, but it heats up. So I might agree with you - the
RAM might not be 'hot', but it would certainly be 'warmer'.

I'm not suggesting that this would cause a normal DRAM stick to go
bad, but only that if he had a very marginal bit of RAM that it might
go out of spec...

- Mark
 
Old 08-21-2011, 04:26 PM
Nikos Chantziaras
 
Default Suspend to RAM caused crashes

On 08/21/2011 07:08 PM, Mark Knecht wrote:

On Sun, Aug 21, 2011 at 8:43 AM, Nikos Chantziaras<realnc@arcor.de> wrote:

On 08/21/2011 06:33 PM, Mark Knecht wrote:


On Sun, Aug 21, 2011 at 8:12 AM, Nikos Chantziaras<realnc@arcor.de>
wrote:


On 08/21/2011 02:19 PM, Francesco Talamona wrote:

[...]
The RAM gets hot when there's RAM load (meaning being used heavily), not
when there's CPU load :*)


Do you feel heat when your PC is turned on and running hard? Of course
you do. The whole machine heats up. The CPU under load heats the
machine so the RAM and drives and everything else heats up also. Not
as hot as the CPU, but it heats up. So I might agree with you - the
RAM might not be 'hot', but it would certainly be 'warmer'.

I'm not suggesting that this would cause a normal DRAM stick to go
bad, but only that if he had a very marginal bit of RAM that it might
go out of spec...


On a laptop maybe. On a desktop, the air around the RAM modules get
maybe 1 degree C warmer (I know because I have temp sensor there,
connected to the front panel).


When it does get warm is when there's GPU and disk load. Those suckers
combined can raise the temp inside the box by 5-6 degrees.


The meaning of all this is that if memtest can't find any errors after a
full run (which can take an hour), the chances of getting an error that
is really related to RAM under CPU stress are very slim.
 
Old 08-21-2011, 05:27 PM
Mark Knecht
 
Default Suspend to RAM caused crashes

On Sun, Aug 21, 2011 at 9:26 AM, Nikos Chantziaras <realnc@arcor.de> wrote:
<SNIP>
>
> The meaning of all this is that if memtest can't find any errors after a
> full run (which can take an hour), the chances of getting an error that is
> really related to RAM under CPU stress are very slim.

Which I completely agree with
 

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