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Old 08-21-2011, 01:41 AM
Hilco Wijbenga
 
Default Disk full at 35%?

Hi all,

It's been quite a few years but I decided to try another Gentoo
install (on a VirtualBox instance). I wanted to try out some new
things...

I created a ton of partitions including /usr (I want to see if I can
get that to work), /portage, and /distfiles. The idea was to mount
/portage on top of /usr and /distfiles on top of /portage. This all
works fine.

However, when I try to extract the Portage snapshot, I get "No space
left on device" a long way into the untar process. According to df
/portage (i.e. /mnt/gentoo/usr/portage) is only 35% full. In fact, not
a single partition or mount is even close to full (except for
/mnt/static, the DVD).

If I untar directly to /usr (after unmounting /portage), everything
works fine. If I then try to copy or move to /portage, I get the "No
space left on device" again. And at the same place.

Does anyone know what's going on here? I didn't realize I was doing
such strange things. At least not this early on. :-)

Cheers,
Hilco
 
Old 08-21-2011, 01:52 AM
 
Default Disk full at 35%?

Hilco Wijbenga <hilco.wijbenga@gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> It's been quite a few years but I decided to try another Gentoo
> install (on a VirtualBox instance). I wanted to try out some new
> things...
>
> I created a ton of partitions including /usr (I want to see if I can
> get that to work), /portage, and /distfiles. The idea was to mount
> /portage on top of /usr and /distfiles on top of /portage. This all
> works fine.
>
> However, when I try to extract the Portage snapshot, I get "No space
> left on device" a long way into the untar process. According to df
> /portage (i.e. /mnt/gentoo/usr/portage) is only 35% full. In fact, not
> a single partition or mount is even close to full (except for
> /mnt/static, the DVD).
>
> If I untar directly to /usr (after unmounting /portage), everything
> works fine. If I then try to copy or move to /portage, I get the "No
> space left on device" again. And at the same place.
>
> Does anyone know what's going on here? I didn't realize I was doing
> such strange things. At least not this early on. :-)

See if you are out of inodes. The only way to get the inodes that I am
aware of is to debugfs to the partition and do stat from within -- if
there is a better way please let me know. But why not use lvm?


--
Your life is like a penny. You're going to lose it. The question is:
How do
you spend it?

John Covici
covici@ccs.covici.com
 
Old 08-21-2011, 03:05 AM
Paul Hartman
 
Default Disk full at 35%?

On Sat, Aug 20, 2011 at 8:41 PM, Hilco Wijbenga
<hilco.wijbenga@gmail.com> wrote:
> However, when I try to extract the Portage snapshot, I get "No space
> left on device" a long way into the untar process. According to df
> /portage (i.e. /mnt/gentoo/usr/portage) is only 35% full. In fact, not
> a single partition or mount is even close to full (except for
> /mnt/static, the DVD).

Try "df -i" to check your inode usage.
 
Old 08-21-2011, 03:30 AM
Hilco Wijbenga
 
Default Disk full at 35%?

On 20 August 2011 18:52, <covici@ccs.covici.com> wrote:
> Hilco Wijbenga <hilco.wijbenga@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> It's been quite a few years but I decided to try another Gentoo
>> install (on a VirtualBox instance). I wanted to try out some new
>> things...
>>
>> I created a ton of partitions including /usr (I want to see if I can
>> get that to work), /portage, and /distfiles. The idea was to mount
>> /portage on top of /usr and /distfiles on top of /portage. This all
>> works fine.
>>
>> However, when I try to extract the Portage snapshot, I get "No space
>> left on device" a long way into the untar process. According to df
>> /portage (i.e. /mnt/gentoo/usr/portage) is only 35% full. In fact, not
>> a single partition or mount is even close to full (except for
>> /mnt/static, the DVD).
>>
>> If I untar directly to /usr (after unmounting /portage), everything
>> works fine. If I then try to copy or move to /portage, I get the "No
>> space left on device" again. And at the same place.
>>
>> Does anyone know what's going on here? I didn't realize I was doing
>> such strange things. At least not this early on. :-)
>
> See if *you are out of inodes. The only way to get the inodes that I am
> aware of is to *debugfs to the partition and do stat from within -- if
> there is a better way please let me know. *But why not use lvm?

Yes, df -i says /portage is out of inodes. I've never run into that
before. I reran mke2fs to increase the inode count and that fixed
things.

Would LVM somehow prevent these sort of things from happening? LVM
doesn't affect inode usage, does it? What exactly are the advantages
of LVM? Is it just that it's easier to resize LVM partitions after the
fact? (That would, of course, already be very useful.)
 
Old 08-21-2011, 03:30 AM
Hilco Wijbenga
 
Default Disk full at 35%?

On 20 August 2011 20:05, Paul Hartman <paul.hartman+gentoo@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sat, Aug 20, 2011 at 8:41 PM, Hilco Wijbenga
> <hilco.wijbenga@gmail.com> wrote:
>> However, when I try to extract the Portage snapshot, I get "No space
>> left on device" a long way into the untar process. According to df
>> /portage (i.e. /mnt/gentoo/usr/portage) is only 35% full. In fact, not
>> a single partition or mount is even close to full (except for
>> /mnt/static, the DVD).
>
> Try "df -i" to check your inode usage.

Yes, thanks, I had just found out about "df -i" myself. :-)
 
Old 08-21-2011, 04:21 AM
Nilesh Govindarajan
 
Default Disk full at 35%?

On 08/21/2011 09:00 AM, Hilco Wijbenga wrote:
> Yes, df -i says /portage is out of inodes. I've never run into that
> before. I reran mke2fs to increase the inode count and that fixed
> things.
>

Sorry for the drop in, but I never knew that mke2fs can increase the
number of inodes!
I think I'll now place the portage tree on an ext2 disk image to speed
up things, / has got fragmented badly due to portage tree :-
Thanks man!

--
Nilesh Govindarajan
http://nileshgr.com
 
Old 08-21-2011, 04:47 AM
Hilco Wijbenga
 
Default Disk full at 35%?

On 20 August 2011 21:21, Nilesh Govindarajan <contact@nileshgr.com> wrote:
> On 08/21/2011 09:00 AM, Hilco Wijbenga wrote:
>> Yes, df -i says /portage is out of inodes. I've never run into that
>> before. I reran mke2fs to increase the inode count and that fixed
>> things.
>
> Sorry for the drop in, but I never knew that mke2fs can increase the
> number of inodes!
> I think I'll now place the portage tree on an ext2 disk image to speed
> up things, / has got fragmented badly due to portage tree :-

Well, for the record, I'm not using ext2 but ext3 (mke2fs -j).
Although, now that I think about it, I suppose there's not much point
in having the Portage tree on a journaled FS.

If you run man mke2fs, you should check out -N and -i. It was
trial-and-error (for me, anyway) to find the right number. Presumably,
-I fits in there somewhere as well. Do note that it only works when
creating the FS, you can't change the inode count dynamically.
 
Old 08-21-2011, 10:13 AM
Mick
 
Default Disk full at 35%?

On Sunday 21 Aug 2011 05:47:16 Hilco Wijbenga wrote:
> On 20 August 2011 21:21, Nilesh Govindarajan <contact@nileshgr.com> wrote:
> > On 08/21/2011 09:00 AM, Hilco Wijbenga wrote:
> >> Yes, df -i says /portage is out of inodes. I've never run into that
> >> before. I reran mke2fs to increase the inode count and that fixed
> >> things.
> >
> > Sorry for the drop in, but I never knew that mke2fs can increase the
> > number of inodes!
> > I think I'll now place the portage tree on an ext2 disk image to speed
> > up things, / has got fragmented badly due to portage tree :-
>
> Well, for the record, I'm not using ext2 but ext3 (mke2fs -j).
> Although, now that I think about it, I suppose there's not much point
> in having the Portage tree on a journaled FS.
>
> If you run man mke2fs, you should check out -N and -i. It was
> trial-and-error (for me, anyway) to find the right number. Presumably,
> -I fits in there somewhere as well. Do note that it only works when
> creating the FS, you can't change the inode count dynamically.

I've never run out of inodes, even on small partitions. I just let ext4 make
a fs with its default settings. Is there a magic formula to determine how
many inodes are optimal?
--
Regards,
Mick
 
Old 08-21-2011, 10:30 AM
Adam Carter
 
Default Disk full at 35%?

>> creating the FS, you can't change the inode count dynamically.
>
> I've never run out of inodes, even on small partitions. *I just let ext4 make
> a fs with its default settings. *Is there a magic formula to determine how
> many inodes are optimal?

Some FSes allocate inodes as required. I know btrfs does this and i
think reiser does it too.
 
Old 08-21-2011, 10:46 AM
Andrea Conti
 
Default Disk full at 35%?

> If you run man mke2fs, you should check out -N and -i. It was
> trial-and-error (for me, anyway) to find the right number.

Consider using reiserfs for /usr/portage. No real performance advantage
over ext[234], but works well with lots of small files and there's no
inode count to worry about.

In my experience the main downside of reiserfs is that fsck.reiserfs is
almost never able to recover cleanly if the filesystem metadata does get
corrupted in a non-trivial way. But for the portage snapshot this isn't
really a problem...

andrea
 

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