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Old 02-11-2008, 04:28 PM
 
Default Technical networking question about changing GW

I happen to be in a situation where I have both a DSL and CABLE
connection to internet up for the time being... (Until the DSL
contract month runs out).

It affords a nifty opportunity to do some experiments. Of course I
tested the speeds of both and it varies between 200 and 500 % faster
on the Cable connection. (Nice).

At first I used single machines connected independently to the
respective IPs for testing, but it slowly dawned on me that I could
hook everything up on the lan, to the same subnet and then just reset
the GateWay target on individual machines as needed, for any of 6
machines.

So currently I have two internet outlets and two gateway routers on
192.168.0.0/24

Here's the technical part:
Assume I have loaded a web page that downloads a video to my cache as
it plays. Assume further there are several of these to be played one
by one.

After playing one, if I reset my GW (and I have also rest
/etc/resolv.conf to use that gw address for dns [probably not totally
necessary]). Followed by /etc/init.d/net.eth0 restart.

Will the browser, which has not been restarted, now use the new
gateway when I run the next link (or for testing, run the same link
again), or will it continue on the same route (which is still
available), that is, will the browser (firefox) continue using the
original GW until the browser itself is restarted?

I know I could track all this with tcpdump but it gets sort of
cumbersome unless you've memorized the necessary commands to filter
output down to something more usable. I usually get so tangled up
with tcpdump I spend more time on it than the project at hand. I
don't use it very frequently so inevitably spend gobs of time at
`man tcpdump' instead of tending to what I started to do.

Why I ask is that the site I'm doing this on requires me to login and
then relocate the stuff I want to see if I have to restart the
browser.

I wanted to try to gauge if there was much of a noticeable difference
with the two IP connections. And it would be handy to just step
through the links changine the GW intermittently.


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Old 02-11-2008, 04:32 PM
deface
 
Default Technical networking question about changing GW

FF will use whatever your conn is set to. as far as logging in thats
cookie based (normally) so the browser should just resume session once
the network is backup ( ie - /etc/init.d/net.eth0 restart)



On Feb 11, 2008, at 11:28 AM, reader@newsguy.com wrote:


I happen to be in a situation where I have both a DSL and CABLE
connection to internet up for the time being... (Until the DSL
contract month runs out).

It affords a nifty opportunity to do some experiments. Of course I
tested the speeds of both and it varies between 200 and 500 % faster
on the Cable connection. (Nice).

At first I used single machines connected independently to the
respective IPs for testing, but it slowly dawned on me that I could
hook everything up on the lan, to the same subnet and then just reset
the GateWay target on individual machines as needed, for any of 6
machines.

So currently I have two internet outlets and two gateway routers on
192.168.0.0/24

Here's the technical part:
Assume I have loaded a web page that downloads a video to my cache as
it plays. Assume further there are several of these to be played one
by one.

After playing one, if I reset my GW (and I have also rest
/etc/resolv.conf to use that gw address for dns [probably not totally
necessary]). Followed by /etc/init.d/net.eth0 restart.

Will the browser, which has not been restarted, now use the new
gateway when I run the next link (or for testing, run the same link
again), or will it continue on the same route (which is still
available), that is, will the browser (firefox) continue using the
original GW until the browser itself is restarted?

I know I could track all this with tcpdump but it gets sort of
cumbersome unless you've memorized the necessary commands to filter
output down to something more usable. I usually get so tangled up
with tcpdump I spend more time on it than the project at hand. I
don't use it very frequently so inevitably spend gobs of time at
`man tcpdump' instead of tending to what I started to do.

Why I ask is that the site I'm doing this on requires me to login and
then relocate the stuff I want to see if I have to restart the
browser.

I wanted to try to gauge if there was much of a noticeable difference
with the two IP connections. And it would be handy to just step
through the links changine the GW intermittently.


--
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Old 02-12-2008, 12:40 AM
Dan Farrell
 
Default Technical networking question about changing GW

On Mon, 11 Feb 2008 11:28:16 -0600
reader@newsguy.com wrote:

> I happen to be in a situation where I have both a DSL and CABLE
> connection to internet up for the time being... (Until the DSL
> contract month runs out).
>
> It affords a nifty opportunity to do some experiments. Of course I
> tested the speeds of both and it varies between 200 and 500 % faster
> on the Cable connection. (Nice).

Neat. You should set up advanced routing so you can use both at once.

> At first I used single machines connected independently to the
> respective IPs for testing, but it slowly dawned on me that I could
> hook everything up on the lan, to the same subnet and then just reset
> the GateWay target on individual machines as needed, for any of 6
> machines.
>
> So currently I have two internet outlets and two gateway routers on
> 192.168.0.0/24

Good job! Many wouldn't have caught that possibility, I bet.

> Here's the technical part:
> Assume I have loaded a web page that downloads a video to my cache as
> it plays. Assume further there are several of these to be played one
> by one.
>
> After playing one, if I reset my GW (and I have also rest
> /etc/resolv.conf to use that gw address for dns [probably not totally
> necessary]).

Right; you could use either to resolve.

> Followed by /etc/init.d/net.eth0 restart.

You may not even need to do that. I think old ips should work OK with
a reset router.

> Will the browser, which has not been restarted, now use the new
> gateway when I run the next link (or for testing, run the same link
> again), or will it continue on the same route (which is still
> available), that is, will the browser (firefox) continue using the
> original GW until the browser itself is restarted?

AFAIK the browser is effectively 'stateless'. It shouldn't need to be
restarted for it's behavior to reflect changes to route, ifconfig, or
resolv.conf.

> I know I could track all this with tcpdump but it gets sort of
> cumbersome unless you've memorized the necessary commands to filter
> output down to something more usable. I usually get so tangled up
> with tcpdump I spend more time on it than the project at hand. I
> don't use it very frequently so inevitably spend gobs of time at
> `man tcpdump' instead of tending to what I started to do.

Yeah, it's confusing. I usually use one of a few incantations:

# tcpdump -i eth0 port not 22

that dumps packets on interface eth0 that arent to port 22 (which I
was using to connect to the server, and gets messy real fast, as
tcpdump itself will be sending over port 22, hence a never-ending cycle
of tcpdump reporting its own traffic)


or perhaps something like:

# tcpdump -i eth0 port 80

that dumps all connections with port 80 on either side.

Finally, for you, something like

# tcpdump

will dump everything. You can then ctrl-C and look through the output
(shift-pageUp/Dn if you have scrollback buffer in the kernel)


> Why I ask is that the site I'm doing this on requires me to login and
> then relocate the stuff I want to see if I have to restart the
> browser.

No, I do this stuff all the time (to set up vpn from coffeeshops and
the like) and I don't ever restart my browser.

> I wanted to try to gauge if there was much of a noticeable difference
> with the two IP connections. And it would be handy to just step
> through the links changine the GW intermittently.

Yes, you can do that, but if you put a linux box between the gateways
and the network you can use both at once.

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Old 02-12-2008, 02:23 AM
 
Default Technical networking question about changing GW

Dan Farrell <dan@spore.ath.cx> writes:

>> I wanted to try to gauge if there was much of a noticeable difference
>> with the two IP connections. And it would be handy to just step
>> through the links changine the GW intermittently.
>
> Yes, you can do that, but if you put a linux box between the gateways
> and the network you can use both at once.

Thanks for the tips...

I'm pretty sure I've done that before in a similar situation a couple
years ago. I don't recall exactly what I did now but I had only one nic
on the linux machine and ran two routers each with an Internet
connection.

Seems like it was a matter of setting a static route to some internet
address through the second gateway, but I've forgotten if there was
more to it.

The trick is getting stuff to use something besides the default route.

Ping can be directed but not any applications like browsers that I
know of.

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Old 02-12-2008, 07:03 PM
Dan Farrell
 
Default Technical networking question about changing GW

On Mon, 11 Feb 2008 21:23:15 -0600
reader@newsguy.com wrote:

> Dan Farrell <dan@spore.ath.cx> writes:
>
> >> I wanted to try to gauge if there was much of a noticeable
> >> difference with the two IP connections. And it would be handy to
> >> just step through the links changine the GW intermittently.
> >
> > Yes, you can do that, but if you put a linux box between the
> > gateways and the network you can use both at once.
>
> Thanks for the tips...
>
> I'm pretty sure I've done that before in a similar situation a couple
> years ago. I don't recall exactly what I did now but I had only one
> nic on the linux machine and ran two routers each with an Internet
> connection.
>
> Seems like it was a matter of setting a static route to some internet
> address through the second gateway, but I've forgotten if there was
> more to it.
>
> The trick is getting stuff to use something besides the default route.
>
> Ping can be directed but not any applications like browsers that I
> know of.
>

http://lartc.org/howto/lartc.rpdb.multiple-links.html

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