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Old 01-23-2011, 05:08 PM
 
Default Identifying missing modules...

Hi,

when doing as root

lspci -vk

I get all pci devices and "bus inhabitants" listed.
Additionally there are often two lines added to each
device saying similiar things like:

Kernel driver in use: >XYZ>
Kernel modules: <XYZ>

and there other devices do not have similiar entries.

My question is: How can I distinguish devices/entities,
which do not need any driver to work and those, which
need a driver but in the current setup the driver wasn't
compiled in/compiled as module?

Thank you very much in advance for any help!
Best regards,
mcc
 
Old 01-23-2011, 07:03 PM
walt
 
Default Identifying missing modules...

On 01/23/2011 10:08 AM, meino.cramer@gmx.de wrote:


Hi,



My question is: How can I distinguish devices/entities,
which do not need any driver to work and those, which
need a driver but in the current setup the driver wasn't
compiled in/compiled as module?


Well, this is quick and dirty and you won't learn much about
kernel modules, but it will most likely work very easily.

Get the latest gentoo installation CD (it really can be any
linux install CD as long as it's recent) and boot it in the
machine you're having trouble with.

The reasoning is the install CD will already have *every*
driver available, and the kernel will load the drivers it
needs for your particular machine.

So, once the CD is booted, just figure out how to get a
console going and type lsmod. Write down anything that
looks related to sound, and build your own kernel with
those drivers enabled.
 
Old 01-23-2011, 07:03 PM
Alan McKinnon
 
Default Identifying missing modules...

Apparently, though unproven, at 20:08 on Sunday 23 January 2011,
meino.cramer@gmx.de did opine thusly:

> Hi,
>
> when doing as root
>
> lspci -vk
>
> I get all pci devices and "bus inhabitants" listed.
> Additionally there are often two lines added to each
> device saying similiar things like:
>
> Kernel driver in use: >XYZ>
> Kernel modules: <XYZ>
>
> and there other devices do not have similiar entries.
>
> My question is: How can I distinguish devices/entities,
> which do not need any driver to work and those, which
> need a driver but in the current setup the driver wasn't
> compiled in/compiled as module?


lspci won't show you the info you request. That's a function known only the
the kernel, not to userspace. What lspci does is find stuff on the pci bus,
then go looking for modules that are attached to it.

Note that it looks for modules (via some kernel<->userspace interface), not
any kernel code driving the device.

Your question is an entirely different beast. I think your best bet is google,
or to find some web site showing a kernel/hardware/module compatibility list.

--
alan dot mckinnon at gmail dot com
 
Old 01-23-2011, 09:13 PM
Mark Knecht
 
Default Identifying missing modules...

On Sun, Jan 23, 2011 at 10:08 AM, <meino.cramer@gmx.de> wrote:
>
> Hi,
>
> when doing as root
>
> * *lspci -vk
>
> I get all pci devices and "bus inhabitants" listed.
> Additionally there are often two lines added to each
> device saying similiar things like:
>
> * * * *Kernel driver in use: >XYZ>
> * * * *Kernel modules: <XYZ>
>
> and there other devices do not have similiar entries.
>
> My question is: How can I distinguish devices/entities,
> which do not need any driver to work and those, which
> need a driver but in the current setup the driver wasn't
> compiled in/compiled as module?
>
> Thank you very much in advance for any help!
> Best regards,
> mcc

Devices that need a driver are listed as 'Kernel driver in use:'
whether the driver is compiled in or not.

Devices that have their driver compiled in do not have the line
'Kernel modules:'

Devices that have neither line are controlled by the kernel but don't
need anything from the driver section.

I suppose there is the possibility that lspci could find a PCI device
which hasn't had a driver selected as module or builtin and then not
show anything. In this case I expect that the device wouldn't
function.

Hope this helps,
Mark
 
Old 01-24-2011, 02:25 AM
 
Default Identifying missing modules...

walt <w41ter@gmail.com> [11-01-24 04:05]:
> On 01/23/2011 10:08 AM, meino.cramer@gmx.de wrote:
> >
> >Hi,
>
> >My question is: How can I distinguish devices/entities,
> >which do not need any driver to work and those, which
> >need a driver but in the current setup the driver wasn't
> >compiled in/compiled as module?
>
> Well, this is quick and dirty and you won't learn much about
> kernel modules, but it will most likely work very easily.
>
> Get the latest gentoo installation CD (it really can be any
> linux install CD as long as it's recent) and boot it in the
> machine you're having trouble with.
>
> The reasoning is the install CD will already have *every*
> driver available, and the kernel will load the drivers it
> needs for your particular machine.
>
> So, once the CD is booted, just figure out how to get a
> console going and type lsmod. Write down anything that
> looks related to sound, and build your own kernel with
> those drivers enabled.
>
>

Is the CD equipped with a linux 2.6.37.* kernel?

Best regards,
mcc
 
Old 01-25-2011, 03:13 AM
James Wall
 
Default Identifying missing modules...

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

On 01/23/11 16:13, Mark Knecht wrote:
> On Sun, Jan 23, 2011 at 10:08 AM, <meino.cramer@gmx.de> wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> when doing as root
>>
>> lspci -vk
>>
>> I get all pci devices and "bus inhabitants" listed.
>> Additionally there are often two lines added to each
>> device saying similiar things like:
>>
>> Kernel driver in use: >XYZ>
>> Kernel modules: <XYZ>
>>
>> and there other devices do not have similiar entries.
>>
>> My question is: How can I distinguish devices/entities,
>> which do not need any driver to work and those, which
>> need a driver but in the current setup the driver wasn't
>> compiled in/compiled as module?
>>
>> Thank you very much in advance for any help!
>> Best regards,
>> mcc
>
> Devices that need a driver are listed as 'Kernel driver in use:'
> whether the driver is compiled in or not.
>
> Devices that have their driver compiled in do not have the line
> 'Kernel modules:'
>
> Devices that have neither line are controlled by the kernel but don't
> need anything from the driver section.
>
> I suppose there is the possibility that lspci could find a PCI device
> which hasn't had a driver selected as module or builtin and then not
> show anything. In this case I expect that the device wouldn't
> function.
>
> Hope this helps,
> Mark
>
Check out http://www.kernel-seeds.org for a walkthrough of kernel
configuration or dump the results of lspci -n into
http://kmuto.jp/debian/hcl/ for a list of modules

James Wall
- --
No trees were harmed in the sending of this message. However, a large
number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.
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