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Old 11-04-2010, 03:43 PM
Mark Knecht
 
Default VMware - Linux kernel yield() functionality is disabled.

Hi,
When starting VMware-Player I get the following message:

The host's Linux kernel yield() functionality is disabled.
Multiprocessor virtual machines exhibit degraded performance without
yield(). Choose 'OK' to enable the sysctl 'kernel.sched_compat_yield'
or 'Cancel' to continue without yield().


Looking around at VMware's site they recommend changing
/etc/sysctl.conf to enable the feature:

http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId= 1027987

I can do that but I'm pretty sure that if I edit that file then
I'll lose the edits some day when doing etc-update's. I'm wondering if
there's a more Gentoo way to turn on a kernel feature like this so
that it survives updates without my full attention.

Thanks,
Mark
 
Old 11-04-2010, 03:57 PM
Alan McKinnon
 
Default VMware - Linux kernel yield() functionality is disabled.

Apparently, though unproven, at 18:43 on Thursday 04 November 2010, Mark
Knecht did opine thusly:

> Hi,
> When starting VMware-Player I get the following message:
>
> The host's Linux kernel yield() functionality is disabled.
> Multiprocessor virtual machines exhibit degraded performance without
> yield(). Choose 'OK' to enable the sysctl 'kernel.sched_compat_yield'
> or 'Cancel' to continue without yield().
>
>
> Looking around at VMware's site they recommend changing
> /etc/sysctl.conf to enable the feature:
>
> http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=di
> splayKC&externalId=1027987
>
> I can do that but I'm pretty sure that if I edit that file then
> I'll lose the edits some day when doing etc-update's. I'm wondering if
> there's a more Gentoo way to turn on a kernel feature like this so
> that it survives updates without my full attention.


Gentoo way:

Use conf-update (or etc-update if you must)
use "merge" function
tell computer what you want it to do

Ubuntu way:

"it survives updates without my full attention"
maintainer tells user what he thinks the computer should do
frustrate user, user gives up in apathy and says "Oh well..."

--
alan dot mckinnon at gmail dot com
 
Old 11-04-2010, 05:54 PM
Nikos Chantziaras
 
Default VMware - Linux kernel yield() functionality is disabled.

On 11/04/2010 06:43 PM, Mark Knecht wrote:

Hi,
When starting VMware-Player I get the following message:

The host's Linux kernel yield() functionality is disabled.
Multiprocessor virtual machines exhibit degraded performance without
yield(). Choose 'OK' to enable the sysctl 'kernel.sched_compat_yield'
or 'Cancel' to continue without yield().


Looking around at VMware's site they recommend changing
/etc/sysctl.conf to enable the feature:

http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId= 1027987

I can do that but I'm pretty sure that if I edit that file then
I'll lose the edits some day when doing etc-update's.


Gentoo will never overwrite your /etc config files. New files are
created with an "._" prefix. When that happens, portage tells you that
"N files in /etc/ need updating." At that point, you either manually
merge the changes or use a tool like "dispatch-conf" (I recommend this
one) or "etc-update". And until you do so, the old files will be used.
 
Old 11-04-2010, 06:03 PM
Mark Knecht
 
Default VMware - Linux kernel yield() functionality is disabled.

On Thu, Nov 4, 2010 at 11:54 AM, Nikos Chantziaras <realnc@arcor.de> wrote:
> On 11/04/2010 06:43 PM, Mark Knecht wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>> * *When starting VMware-Player I get the following message:
>>
>> The host's Linux kernel yield() functionality is disabled.
>> Multiprocessor virtual machines exhibit degraded performance without
>> yield(). Choose 'OK' to enable the sysctl 'kernel.sched_compat_yield'
>> or 'Cancel' to continue without yield().
>>
>>
>> * *Looking around at VMware's site they recommend changing
>> /etc/sysctl.conf to enable the feature:
>>
>>
>> http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId= 1027987
>>
>> * *I can do that but I'm pretty sure that if I edit that file then
>> I'll lose the edits some day when doing etc-update's.
>
> Gentoo will never overwrite your /etc config files. *New files are created
> with an "._" prefix. *When that happens, portage tells you that "N files in
> /etc/ need updating." *At that point, you either manually merge the changes
> or use a tool like "dispatch-conf" (I recommend this one) or "etc-update".
> *And until you do so, the old files will be used.

Yes, thanks Nikos. I do understand that part.

I tried dispatch-conf years ago and couldn't get the hang of it. It
was not clear to me what was old/new and all the rest of that.

My worry with etc-update is that I know, for the most part, all the
files I modify when doing an install so I know what to look for when
I'm selecting files to replace myself. However with that tool there's
a point where you might have 20 files that need updating, you look at
the list and nothing looks like what I changed and you hit -5 to tell
it to do everything. I know I'm going to overwrite sysctl.conf that
way because it's not in my mental list.

It's easy enough for me to keep a copy and fix it by hand since the
only place this option seems to matter is VMware and it's very clear
about what the problem is. I'll likely just go that way. This isn't a
problem that causes the machine not to boot or anything like that.

Cheers,
Mark
 
Old 11-04-2010, 06:20 PM
Alan McKinnon
 
Default VMware - Linux kernel yield() functionality is disabled.

Apparently, though unproven, at 21:03 on Thursday 04 November 2010, Mark
Knecht did opine thusly:

> On Thu, Nov 4, 2010 at 11:54 AM, Nikos Chantziaras <realnc@arcor.de> wrote:
> > On 11/04/2010 06:43 PM, Mark Knecht wrote:
> >> Hi,
> >> When starting VMware-Player I get the following message:
> >>
> >> The host's Linux kernel yield() functionality is disabled.
> >> Multiprocessor virtual machines exhibit degraded performance without
> >> yield(). Choose 'OK' to enable the sysctl 'kernel.sched_compat_yield'
> >> or 'Cancel' to continue without yield().
> >>
> >>
> >> Looking around at VMware's site they recommend changing
> >> /etc/sysctl.conf to enable the feature:
> >>
> >>
> >> http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd
> >> =displayKC&externalId=1027987
> >>
> >> I can do that but I'm pretty sure that if I edit that file then
> >> I'll lose the edits some day when doing etc-update's.
> >
> > Gentoo will never overwrite your /etc config files. New files are
> > created with an "._" prefix. When that happens, portage tells you that
> > "N files in /etc/ need updating." At that point, you either manually
> > merge the changes or use a tool like "dispatch-conf" (I recommend this
> > one) or "etc-update". And until you do so, the old files will be used.
>
> Yes, thanks Nikos. I do understand that part.
>
> I tried dispatch-conf years ago and couldn't get the hang of it. It
> was not clear to me what was old/new and all the rest of that.
>
> My worry with etc-update is that I know, for the most part, all the
> files I modify when doing an install so I know what to look for when
> I'm selecting files to replace myself. However with that tool there's
> a point where you might have 20 files that need updating, you look at
> the list and nothing looks like what I changed and you hit -5 to tell
> it to do everything. I know I'm going to overwrite sysctl.conf that
> way because it's not in my mental list.
>
> It's easy enough for me to keep a copy and fix it by hand since the
> only place this option seems to matter is VMware and it's very clear
> about what the problem is. I'll likely just go that way. This isn't a
> problem that causes the machine not to boot or anything like that.


I find conf-update much better than dispatch-conf and etc-update. It's curses-
based and displays the modified files in a tree structure by directory. Very
intuitive display. And it's smart enough to know to just apply changes to
files that differ only in whitespace for example.

I set aside a few minutes after an update to look at each file individually.
The diff it shows is colorized which is a huge help. The only tricky part is
doing a merge. It shows old and new and you have to say "l" or "r" for each
chunk (a contiguous collection of changed lines). The only issue is when you
want to tweak only one line in a multi-line chunk. It's rare, and I just use
vi on those files.

Try conf-update, you might like it. It's a good middle-ground, I find.


--
alan dot mckinnon at gmail dot com
 
Old 11-04-2010, 06:53 PM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default VMware - Linux kernel yield() functionality is disabled.

On Thu, 4 Nov 2010 21:20:25 +0200, Alan McKinnon wrote:

> I find conf-update much better than dispatch-conf and etc-update. It's
> curses- based and displays the modified files in a tree structure by
> directory. Very intuitive display. And it's smart enough to know to
> just apply changes to files that differ only in whitespace for example.

+1 for conf-update


--
Neil Bothwick

"Press Return to Continue" - known as "The Mail Menupause".
 
Old 11-04-2010, 07:10 PM
Mark Knecht
 
Default VMware - Linux kernel yield() functionality is disabled.

On Thu, Nov 4, 2010 at 12:53 PM, Neil Bothwick <neil@digimed.co.uk> wrote:
> On Thu, 4 Nov 2010 21:20:25 +0200, Alan McKinnon wrote:
>
>> I find conf-update much better than dispatch-conf and etc-update. It's
>> curses- based and displays the modified files in a tree structure by
>> directory. Very intuitive display. And it's smart enough to know to
>> just apply changes to files that differ only in whitespace for example.
>
> +1 for conf-update
>

I'll give it a try next time around.

Thanks guys!

- Mark
 
Old 11-04-2010, 07:47 PM
Stroller
 
Default VMware - Linux kernel yield() functionality is disabled.

On 4/11/2010, at 7:20pm, Alan McKinnon wrote:
> ...
> I find conf-update much better than dispatch-conf and etc-update. It's curses-
> based and displays the modified files in a tree structure by directory. Very
> intuitive display. And it's smart enough to know to just apply changes to
> files that differ only in whitespace for example.

I believe etc-update is smart about whitespace, too. At least, it will often report that it is automatically handling trivial changes in a number of files.

I will have to try conf-update - its interface sounds nice.

Stroller.
 
Old 11-04-2010, 09:06 PM
Adam Carter
 
Default VMware - Linux kernel yield() functionality is disabled.

I will have to try conf-update - its interface sounds nice.



If you run X, then cfg-update, configured to use meld for the diffing/editing via GUI, is nice and clear.
 
Old 11-04-2010, 09:32 PM
Alex Schuster
 
Default VMware - Linux kernel yield() functionality is disabled.

Am 04.11.2010 20:20, schrieb Alan McKinnon:

> Try conf-update, you might like it. It's a good middle-ground, I find.

I like cfg-update[*]. I use it with kdiff3, but you can use about any
merge tool you like, be it GUI or CLI. Looks quite sophisticated to me.
I only worry that it is not being developed any more, and needs a new
maintainer for a long time now. But it still seems to work very well.

Features:
- updating multiple machines from a single location
(see /etc/cfg-update.hosts)
- updating with GUI or CLI tools of your choice
(see /etc/cfg-update.conf)
- support for Portage and Paludis packagemanagers
(via hooks)
- automatic updating of unmodified config files and
unmodified binaries
- automatic 3-way merging of modified config files
(only if backup of previous update is found)
- the above means that the script does more automatic
updates the longer you use it
- it correctly handles file2link, link2file and link2link
situations
- it creates backups before it touches your files so
you can abort an update or restore files afterwards
- you can use the --automatic-only option for scheduling
with cronjobs or other scripts
- supported GUI merge tools: xxdiff, kdiff3, meld, gtkdiff,
tkdiff, gvimdiff
- supported CLI merge tools: vimdiff, sdiff, imediff2
- all features documented in the manpage (man cfg-update)
[*] http://forums.gentoo.org/viewtopic.php?t=86622

Wonko
 

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