FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > Gentoo > Gentoo User

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 09-10-2010, 08:43 AM
Jake Moe
 
Default Booting Gentoo from USB stick

On 10/09/2010 5:27 PM, Maciej Grela wrote:

2010/9/10 Jake Moe<jakesaddress@gmail.com>:

Hello all,

I've been thinking about creating a Gentoo USB stick for install and rescue
purposes (and, of course, just to see if I could). I've mostly followed the
Gentoo handbook (I used a single 4GB partition for the whole system, and no
swap). I've used genkernel for the kernel (so I can have a multi-system
capable kernel). I've gotten GRUB installed and working. My problem comes
in after what I believe is the init process:


Gentoo Linux; http://www.gentoo.org
Copyright 1999-2009 Gentoo Foundation; Distributed under the GPLv2

Press I to enter interactive boot mode

* Mounting proc at /proc ... [
ok ]
* Mounting sysfs at /sys ... [
ok ]
* Mounting /dev ... [
ok ]
* Starting udevd ... [
ok ]
* Populating /dev with existing devices through uevents ... [
ok ]
* Waiting for uevents to be processed ... [
ok ]
* Mounting devpts at /dev/pts ... [
ok ]
* Checking root filesystem ...
fsck.ext2: No such file or directory while trying to open /dev/sda1
/dev/sda1:
The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct ext2
filesystem. If the device is valid and it really contains an ext2
filesystem (and not swap or ufs or something else), then the superblock
is corrupt, and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate superblock:
e2fsck -b 8193<device>

* Filesystem couldn't be fixed [
!! ]
Give root password for maintenance
(or type Control-D to continue):


If I give the root password, I can find no /dev/sda1. However, mount shows
/dev/sda1 on /, and there *is* a /sys/block/sda folders, with a sda1 folder
in that as well. It's almost like it had /dev/sda1, but then lost it
somehow.

Does anyone have any idea what's going on here? Any help would be
appreciated.


Have you seen http://www.sysresccd.org/Main_Page ? It's based on
Gentoo, you could check what they did to boot from a usb stick.

Br,
Maciej Grela

Excellent, thanks for that, I hadn't found it in my previous searches.
I'll have a look there.


Jake Moe
 
Old 09-10-2010, 09:05 AM
"J. Roeleveld"
 
Default Booting Gentoo from USB stick

On Friday 10 September 2010 10:43:30 Jake Moe wrote:
> On 10/09/2010 5:27 PM, Maciej Grela wrote:
> > 2010/9/10 Jake Moe<jakesaddress@gmail.com>:
> >> Hello all,
> >>
> >> I've been thinking about creating a Gentoo USB stick for install and
> >> rescue purposes (and, of course, just to see if I could). I've mostly
> >> followed the Gentoo handbook (I used a single 4GB partition for the
> >> whole system, and no swap). I've used genkernel for the kernel (so I
> >> can have a multi-system capable kernel). I've gotten GRUB installed
> >> and working. My problem comes in after what I believe is the init
> >> process:
> >>
> >>
> >> Gentoo Linux; http://www.gentoo.org
> >>
> >> Copyright 1999-2009 Gentoo Foundation; Distributed under the GPLv2
> >>
> >> Press I to enter interactive boot mode
> >>
> >> * Mounting proc at /proc ...
> >> [
> >>
> >> ok ]
> >>
> >> * Mounting sysfs at /sys ...
> >> [
> >>
> >> ok ]
> >>
> >> * Mounting /dev ...
> >> [
> >>
> >> ok ]
> >>
> >> * Starting udevd ...
> >> [
> >>
> >> ok ]
> >>
> >> * Populating /dev with existing devices through uevents ...
> >> [
> >>
> >> ok ]
> >>
> >> * Waiting for uevents to be processed ...
> >> [
> >>
> >> ok ]
> >>
> >> * Mounting devpts at /dev/pts ...
> >> [
> >>
> >> ok ]
> >>
> >> * Checking root filesystem ...
> >>
> >> fsck.ext2: No such file or directory while trying to open /dev/sda1
> >> /dev/sda1:
> >> The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct ext2
> >> filesystem. If the device is valid and it really contains an ext2
> >> filesystem (and not swap or ufs or something else), then the superblock
> >>
> >> is corrupt, and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate
superblock:
> >> e2fsck -b 8193<device>
> >>
> >> * Filesystem couldn't be fixed
> >> [
> >>
> >> !! ]
> >> Give root password for maintenance
> >> (or type Control-D to continue):
> >>
> >>
> >> If I give the root password, I can find no /dev/sda1. However, mount
> >> shows /dev/sda1 on /, and there *is* a /sys/block/sda folders, with a
> >> sda1 folder in that as well. It's almost like it had /dev/sda1, but
> >> then lost it somehow.
> >>
> >> Does anyone have any idea what's going on here? Any help would be
> >> appreciated.
> >
> > Have you seen http://www.sysresccd.org/Main_Page ? It's based on
> > Gentoo, you could check what they did to boot from a usb stick.
> >
> > Br,
> > Maciej Grela
>
> Excellent, thanks for that, I hadn't found it in my previous searches.
> I'll have a look there.
>
> Jake Moe

Had a similar issue a while ago when I was playing around with this myself.

Take a look at the linux boot parameters.

The 'theoretical' part is: You need to let the kernel initialize the USB-stick
before trying to access it. (This can take some time)

There is a delay-option, just can't remember the proper name off-hand.

--
Joost
 
Old 09-10-2010, 10:51 AM
Al
 
Default Booting Gentoo from USB stick

>
> If I give the root password, I can find no /dev/sda1. *However, mount shows
> /dev/sda1 on /, and there *is* a /sys/block/sda folders, with a sda1 folder
> in that as well. *It's almost like it had /dev/sda1, but then lost it
> somehow.
>
> Does anyone have any idea what's going on here? *Any help would be
> appreciated.

This may be a problem with the order of disks. If there is a harddisk
and a USB, which one is recognized as sda1? I guess that can even
depend on the BIOS settings.

Then there are differences between different versions of Grub (but you
already manged the Grub setup).

I came to the following solution for me to make things more easy:

I put Grub always on the harddisk. I have a little linux partion only
for the purpose to configure Grub. So it's unambiguously that the
harddisk is the first disk and that Grub is on the first disk.

Now I can freely experiment on all other partitions and disks. I never
install a bootloader on those other partitions.

Sure that doesn't work for a rescue system when the harddisk is
broken. In that case I would use any live CD.

Al
 
Old 09-10-2010, 11:29 AM
David Relson
 
Default Booting Gentoo from USB stick

On Fri, 10 Sep 2010 11:05:12 +0200
J. Roeleveld wrote:

> On Friday 10 September 2010 10:43:30 Jake Moe wrote:
> > On 10/09/2010 5:27 PM, Maciej Grela wrote:
> > > 2010/9/10 Jake Moe<jakesaddress@gmail.com>:
> > >> Hello all,
> > >>
> > >> I've been thinking about creating a Gentoo USB stick for install
> > >> and rescue purposes (and, of course, just to see if I could).
> > >> I've mostly followed the Gentoo handbook (I used a single 4GB
> > >> partition for the whole system, and no swap). I've used
> > >> genkernel for the kernel (so I can have a multi-system capable
> > >> kernel). I've gotten GRUB installed and working. My problem
> > >> comes in after what I believe is the init process:
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> Gentoo Linux; http://www.gentoo.org
> > >>
> > >> Copyright 1999-2009 Gentoo Foundation; Distributed under the
> > >> GPLv2
> > >>
> > >> Press I to enter interactive boot mode
> > >>
> > >> * Mounting proc
> > >> at /proc ... [
> > >>
> > >> ok ]
> > >>
> > >> * Mounting sysfs
> > >> at /sys ... [
> > >>
> > >> ok ]
> > >>
> > >> *
> > >> Mounting /dev ... [
> > >>
> > >> ok ]
> > >>
> > >> * Starting
> > >> udevd ... [
> > >>
> > >> ok ]
> > >>
> > >> * Populating /dev with existing devices through
> > >> uevents ... [
> > >>
> > >> ok ]
> > >>
> > >> * Waiting for uevents to be
> > >> processed ... [
> > >>
> > >> ok ]
> > >>
> > >> * Mounting devpts
> > >> at /dev/pts ... [
> > >>
> > >> ok ]
> > >>
> > >> * Checking root filesystem ...
> > >>
> > >> fsck.ext2: No such file or directory while trying to
> > >> open /dev/sda1 /dev/sda1:
> > >> The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct
> > >> ext2 filesystem. If the device is valid and it really contains
> > >> an ext2 filesystem (and not swap or ufs or something else), then
> > >> the superblock
> > >>
> > >> is corrupt, and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate
> superblock:
> > >> e2fsck -b 8193<device>
> > >>
> > >> * Filesystem couldn't be
> > >> fixed [
> > >>
> > >> !! ]
> > >> Give root password for maintenance
> > >> (or type Control-D to continue):
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> If I give the root password, I can find no /dev/sda1. However,
> > >> mount shows /dev/sda1 on /, and there *is* a /sys/block/sda
> > >> folders, with a sda1 folder in that as well. It's almost like
> > >> it had /dev/sda1, but then lost it somehow.
> > >>
> > >> Does anyone have any idea what's going on here? Any help would
> > >> be appreciated.
> > >
> > > Have you seen http://www.sysresccd.org/Main_Page ? It's based on
> > > Gentoo, you could check what they did to boot from a usb stick.
> > >
> > > Br,
> > > Maciej Grela
> >
> > Excellent, thanks for that, I hadn't found it in my previous
> > searches. I'll have a look there.
> >
> > Jake Moe
>
> Had a similar issue a while ago when I was playing around with this
> myself.
>
> Take a look at the linux boot parameters.
>
> The 'theoretical' part is: You need to let the kernel initialize the
> USB-stick before trying to access it. (This can take some time)
>
> There is a delay-option, just can't remember the proper name off-hand.
>
> --
> Joost

I've got USB booting working in a syslinux environment. A delay of 12
seconds is working for me. The syslinux.cfg stanza I use is:

LABEL usb
KERNEL linux
APPEND rootdelay=12 root=/dev/sda2

HTH,

David
 
Old 09-14-2010, 06:28 PM
YoYo Siska
 
Default Booting Gentoo from USB stick

On Fri, Sep 10, 2010 at 07:29:01AM -0400, David Relson wrote:
> On Fri, 10 Sep 2010 11:05:12 +0200
> J. Roeleveld wrote:
>
> > On Friday 10 September 2010 10:43:30 Jake Moe wrote:
> > > On 10/09/2010 5:27 PM, Maciej Grela wrote:
> > > > 2010/9/10 Jake Moe<jakesaddress@gmail.com>:
> > > >> Hello all,
> > > >>
> > > >> I've been thinking about creating a Gentoo USB stick for install
> > > >> and rescue purposes (and, of course, just to see if I could).
> > > >> I've mostly followed the Gentoo handbook (I used a single 4GB
> > > >> partition for the whole system, and no swap). I've used
> > > >> genkernel for the kernel (so I can have a multi-system capable
> > > >> kernel). I've gotten GRUB installed and working. My problem
> > > >> comes in after what I believe is the init process:
> > > >>
> > > >>
> > > >> Gentoo Linux; http://www.gentoo.org
> > > >>
> > > >> Copyright 1999-2009 Gentoo Foundation; Distributed under the
> > > >> GPLv2
> > > >>
> > > >> Press I to enter interactive boot mode
> > > >>
> > > >> * Mounting proc
> > > >> at /proc ... [
> > > >>
> > > >> ok ]
> > > >>
> > > >> * Mounting sysfs
> > > >> at /sys ... [
> > > >>
> > > >> ok ]
> > > >>
> > > >> *
> > > >> Mounting /dev ... [
> > > >>
> > > >> ok ]
> > > >>
> > > >> * Starting
> > > >> udevd ... [
> > > >>
> > > >> ok ]
> > > >>
> > > >> * Populating /dev with existing devices through
> > > >> uevents ... [
> > > >>
> > > >> ok ]
> > > >>
> > > >> * Waiting for uevents to be
> > > >> processed ... [
> > > >>
> > > >> ok ]
> > > >>
> > > >> * Mounting devpts
> > > >> at /dev/pts ... [
> > > >>
> > > >> ok ]
> > > >>
> > > >> * Checking root filesystem ...
> > > >>
> > > >> fsck.ext2: No such file or directory while trying to
> > > >> open /dev/sda1 /dev/sda1:
> > > >> The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct
> > > >> ext2 filesystem. If the device is valid and it really contains
> > > >> an ext2 filesystem (and not swap or ufs or something else), then
> > > >> the superblock
> > > >>
> > > >> is corrupt, and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate
> > superblock:
> > > >> e2fsck -b 8193<device>
> > > >>
> > > >> * Filesystem couldn't be
> > > >> fixed [
> > > >>
> > > >> !! ]
> > > >> Give root password for maintenance
> > > >> (or type Control-D to continue):
> > > >>
> > > >>
> > > >> If I give the root password, I can find no /dev/sda1. However,
> > > >> mount shows /dev/sda1 on /, and there *is* a /sys/block/sda
> > > >> folders, with a sda1 folder in that as well. It's almost like
> > > >> it had /dev/sda1, but then lost it somehow.
> > > >>
> > > >> Does anyone have any idea what's going on here? Any help would
> > > >> be appreciated.
> > > >
> > > > Have you seen http://www.sysresccd.org/Main_Page ? It's based on
> > > > Gentoo, you could check what they did to boot from a usb stick.
> > > >
> > > > Br,
> > > > Maciej Grela
> > >
> > > Excellent, thanks for that, I hadn't found it in my previous
> > > searches. I'll have a look there.
> > >
> > > Jake Moe
> >
> > Had a similar issue a while ago when I was playing around with this
> > myself.
> >
> > Take a look at the linux boot parameters.
> >
> > The 'theoretical' part is: You need to let the kernel initialize the
> > USB-stick before trying to access it. (This can take some time)
> >
> > There is a delay-option, just can't remember the proper name off-hand.
> >
> > --
> > Joost
>
> I've got USB booting working in a syslinux environment. A delay of 12
> seconds is working for me. The syslinux.cfg stanza I use is:
>
> LABEL usb
> KERNEL linux
> APPEND rootdelay=12 root=/dev/sda2

The usual way for linux on removable usb sticks / disks is to use LABEL
or UUID to identify the disks and not the device names, because they
will be different in different computers The downside is that you
need an initrd to mount the root partition... I think that the usual
initrd generated by genkernel works...

If you created the rootfs with:
mkfs.ext2 -j -LUSBGentoo /dev/sdXY

then you can change the kernel parameter to
root=LABEL=USBGentoo

and your fstab to:
LABEL=USBGentoo / ext3 ...

You can also use the uuid of the filesystem, find it out with
dumpe2fs -h /dev/sdb2 | grep UUID
and then use UUID=XXX instead of LABEL=XXX

I never really played around with grub and USB booting, so I use
syslinux. I create a small FAT partition with syslinux, kernel and
initrd image (it gets also pretty handy when you sometimes need to copy
something from a windows machine and a second "regular" ext3
partition for the rootfs.

Basically you would do:
- partition the stick, mark the FAT partition as bootable/active
- format the partitions:
- mkfs.vfat -nUSBData /dev/sdX1
- mkfs.ext2 -j -LUSBGentoo /dev/sdX2
- install syslinux (on the FAT partition):
- syslinux /dev/sdX1
- mount /dev/sdX2, install gentoo in the usual way
- compile the kernel and initrd, make sure required USB stuff is in the kernel
(theoretically it could be as modules in initrd... but in-kernel is safer
if you are in a hurry, or don't know how to create them, get them from
a gentoo livecd don't forget to also copy the modules
(/lib/modules-XXX/...) from the livecd to the rootfs.
- put the kernel and initrd on the FAT partition (I name them vmlinuz.img
and initrd.img)
- edit syslinux.cfg (on the FAT partition), see
http://syslinux.zytor.com/wiki/index.php/SYSLINUX#How_do_I_Configure_SYSLINUX.3F
a very simple one from my USB disk:

DEFAULT linux
LABEL linux
SAY Now booting USBGentoo
KERNEL vmlinuz.img
APPEND root=LABEL=USBGentoo initrd=initrd.img

you might also add rootdelay=10 to the options if the usb stick/disk isn't
detected quick enough

umount, reboot, set the computer to boot from usb, enjoy...
Xorg without a config seems to work pretty well on most computers these
days, IIRC the alsa modules for soundcards are also autoloaded, so you
don't need any fancy hw detection to have a desktop running from USB
stick


yoyo



BTW there is also a "manual" way to boot even without an initrd: use
LABEL=XXX in your fstab, on the kernel command line use root=/dev/sda2
(or whatever you think will be more probable on you machines
then try to boot it, if it is wrong, you can enter the corrent
"root=/dev/sdX2" param in the syslinux prompt (you can either look up the
correct device in the boot messages, or just try sda, sdb, sdc, ...
You could also create menu options for the usual cases... (sda...sdf
shoud be more than enough...
You can however accidentally mount a rootfs from one of the disks on the
computer and thus booting the system on the computer, just with your
kernel...
 
Old 09-14-2010, 10:34 PM
Jake Moe
 
Default Booting Gentoo from USB stick

On 15/09/10 04:28, YoYo Siska wrote:

On Fri, Sep 10, 2010 at 07:29:01AM -0400, David Relson wrote:

On Fri, 10 Sep 2010 11:05:12 +0200
J. Roeleveld wrote:


On Friday 10 September 2010 10:43:30 Jake Moe wrote:

On 10/09/2010 5:27 PM, Maciej Grela wrote:

2010/9/10 Jake Moe<jakesaddress@gmail.com>:

Hello all,

I've been thinking about creating a Gentoo USB stick for install
and rescue purposes (and, of course, just to see if I could).
I've mostly followed the Gentoo handbook (I used a single 4GB
partition for the whole system, and no swap). I've used
genkernel for the kernel (so I can have a multi-system capable
kernel). I've gotten GRUB installed and working. My problem
comes in after what I believe is the init process:


Gentoo Linux; http://www.gentoo.org

Copyright 1999-2009 Gentoo Foundation; Distributed under the
GPLv2

Press I to enter interactive boot mode

* Mounting proc
at /proc ... [

ok ]

* Mounting sysfs
at /sys ... [

ok ]

*
Mounting /dev ... [

ok ]

* Starting
udevd ... [

ok ]

* Populating /dev with existing devices through
uevents ... [

ok ]

* Waiting for uevents to be
processed ... [

ok ]

* Mounting devpts
at /dev/pts ... [

ok ]

* Checking root filesystem ...

fsck.ext2: No such file or directory while trying to
open /dev/sda1 /dev/sda1:
The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct
ext2 filesystem. If the device is valid and it really contains
an ext2 filesystem (and not swap or ufs or something else), then
the superblock

is corrupt, and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate

superblock:

e2fsck -b 8193<device>

* Filesystem couldn't be
fixed [

!! ]
Give root password for maintenance
(or type Control-D to continue):


If I give the root password, I can find no /dev/sda1. However,
mount shows /dev/sda1 on /, and there *is* a /sys/block/sda
folders, with a sda1 folder in that as well. It's almost like
it had /dev/sda1, but then lost it somehow.

Does anyone have any idea what's going on here? Any help would
be appreciated.

Have you seen http://www.sysresccd.org/Main_Page ? It's based on
Gentoo, you could check what they did to boot from a usb stick.

Br,
Maciej Grela

Excellent, thanks for that, I hadn't found it in my previous
searches. I'll have a look there.

Jake Moe

Had a similar issue a while ago when I was playing around with this
myself.

Take a look at the linux boot parameters.

The 'theoretical' part is: You need to let the kernel initialize the
USB-stick before trying to access it. (This can take some time)

There is a delay-option, just can't remember the proper name off-hand.

--
Joost

I've got USB booting working in a syslinux environment. A delay of 12
seconds is working for me. The syslinux.cfg stanza I use is:

LABEL usb
KERNEL linux
APPEND rootdelay=12 root=/dev/sda2

The usual way for linux on removable usb sticks / disks is to use LABEL
or UUID to identify the disks and not the device names, because they
will be different in different computers The downside is that you
need an initrd to mount the root partition... I think that the usual
initrd generated by genkernel works...

If you created the rootfs with:
mkfs.ext2 -j -LUSBGentoo /dev/sdXY

then you can change the kernel parameter to
root=LABEL=USBGentoo

and your fstab to:
LABEL=USBGentoo / ext3 ...

You can also use the uuid of the filesystem, find it out with
dumpe2fs -h /dev/sdb2 | grep UUID
and then use UUID=XXX instead of LABEL=XXX

I never really played around with grub and USB booting, so I use
syslinux. I create a small FAT partition with syslinux, kernel and
initrd image (it gets also pretty handy when you sometimes need to copy
something from a windows machine and a second "regular" ext3
partition for the rootfs.

Basically you would do:
- partition the stick, mark the FAT partition as bootable/active
- format the partitions:
- mkfs.vfat -nUSBData /dev/sdX1
- mkfs.ext2 -j -LUSBGentoo /dev/sdX2
- install syslinux (on the FAT partition):
- syslinux /dev/sdX1
- mount /dev/sdX2, install gentoo in the usual way
- compile the kernel and initrd, make sure required USB stuff is in the kernel
(theoretically it could be as modules in initrd... but in-kernel is safer
if you are in a hurry, or don't know how to create them, get them from
a gentoo livecd don't forget to also copy the modules
(/lib/modules-XXX/...) from the livecd to the rootfs.
- put the kernel and initrd on the FAT partition (I name them vmlinuz.img
and initrd.img)
- edit syslinux.cfg (on the FAT partition), see
http://syslinux.zytor.com/wiki/index.php/SYSLINUX#How_do_I_Configure_SYSLINUX.3F
a very simple one from my USB disk:

DEFAULT linux
LABEL linux
SAY Now booting USBGentoo
KERNEL vmlinuz.img
APPEND root=LABEL=USBGentoo initrd=initrd.img

you might also add rootdelay=10 to the options if the usb stick/disk isn't
detected quick enough

umount, reboot, set the computer to boot from usb, enjoy...
Xorg without a config seems to work pretty well on most computers these
days, IIRC the alsa modules for soundcards are also autoloaded, so you
don't need any fancy hw detection to have a desktop running from USB
stick


yoyo



BTW there is also a "manual" way to boot even without an initrd: use
LABEL=XXX in your fstab, on the kernel command line use root=/dev/sda2
(or whatever you think will be more probable on you machines
then try to boot it, if it is wrong, you can enter the corrent
"root=/dev/sdX2" param in the syslinux prompt (you can either look up the
correct device in the boot messages, or just try sda, sdb, sdc, ...
You could also create menu options for the usual cases... (sda...sdf
shoud be more than enough...
You can however accidentally mount a rootfs from one of the disks on the
computer and thus booting the system on the computer, just with your
kernel...




Thanks for that. I originally tried with "LABEL=UsbRoot" in both GRUB
and fstab, but it couldn't find it, so I put it in a system that I'd
pulled the hard drive from, so I could test if it'd work with /dev/sda
instead. Neither method works; it just doesn't seem to see the USB
storage in /dev. When I try by label, I get what's in the attached error.


I've had a quick look at SYSLINUX (and it's counterpart, EXTLINUX), and
it appears to really be nothing more than another bootloader like LILO
or GRUB. Is that the case? If so, I might try and overwrite GRUB with
EXTLINUX and see if that works; it appears that it should be that easy.
Most of the USB booting doco I can find seems to want SYSLINUX anyway;
maybe I'll give it a try. I had thought that a USB storage device is
storage like anything else, so a "standard" install should work. Maybe
it doesn't...


Jake Moe
>> Activiating mdev
>> Determining root device...
/init: line 477: blkid: not found
!! Could not find the root block device in LABEL=UsbRoot.
Please specify another value or: press Enter for hte same, type "shell" for a
shell, or "q" to skip...
root block device(LABEL=UsbRoot) :: /dev/sda1
>> Mounting root...
>> Booting (initramfs)..
INIT: version 2.87 booting

Gentoo Linux; http://www.gentoo.org/
Copyright 1999-2009 Gentoo Foundation; Distributed under teh GPLv2

Press I to enter interactive boot mode

* Mounting proc at /proc ... [ ok ]
* Mounting sysfs at /sys ... [ ok ]
* Mounting /dev ... [ ok ]
* Starting udevd ... [ ok ]
* Populating /dev with existing devices through uevents ... [ ok ]
* Waiting for uevents to be processed ... [ ok ]
* Mounting devpts at /dev/pts ... [ ok ]
* Checking root filesystem ...
fsck.ext2: Unable to resolve 'LABEL=UsbRoot'
* Filesystem couldn't be fixed [ !! ]
Give root password for maintenance
(or type Control-D to continue):
 
Old 09-15-2010, 10:10 AM
YoYo Siska
 
Default Booting Gentoo from USB stick

On Wed, Sep 15, 2010 at 08:34:33AM +1000, Jake Moe wrote:
> On 15/09/10 04:28, YoYo Siska wrote:
> >On Fri, Sep 10, 2010 at 07:29:01AM -0400, David Relson wrote:
> >>On Fri, 10 Sep 2010 11:05:12 +0200
> >>J. Roeleveld wrote:
> >>
> >>>On Friday 10 September 2010 10:43:30 Jake Moe wrote:
> >>>> On 10/09/2010 5:27 PM, Maciej Grela wrote:
> >>>>>2010/9/10 Jake Moe<jakesaddress@gmail.com>:
> >>>>>> Hello all,
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>I've been thinking about creating a Gentoo USB stick for install
> >>>>>>and rescue purposes (and, of course, just to see if I could).
> >>>>>>I've mostly followed the Gentoo handbook (I used a single 4GB
> >>>>>>partition for the whole system, and no swap). I've used
> >>>>>>genkernel for the kernel (so I can have a multi-system capable
> >>>>>>kernel). I've gotten GRUB installed and working. My problem
> >>>>>>comes in after what I believe is the init process:
> >>>>>> * Checking root filesystem ...
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>fsck.ext2: No such file or directory while trying to
> >>>>>>open /dev/sda1 /dev/sda1:
> >>>>>>The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct
> >>>>>>ext2 filesystem. If the device is valid and it really contains
> >>>>>>an ext2 filesystem (and not swap or ufs or something else), then
> >>>>>>the superblock
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>is corrupt, and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate
> >>>superblock:
> >>>>>> e2fsck -b 8193<device>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> * Filesystem couldn't be
> >>>>>>fixed [
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>!! ]
> >>>>>>Give root password for maintenance
> >>>>>>(or type Control-D to continue):
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>If I give the root password, I can find no /dev/sda1. However,
> >>>>>>mount shows /dev/sda1 on /, and there *is* a /sys/block/sda
> >>>>>>folders, with a sda1 folder in that as well. It's almost like
> >>>>>>it had /dev/sda1, but then lost it somehow.
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>Does anyone have any idea what's going on here? Any help would
> >>>>>>be appreciated.
> >>>>>Have you seen http://www.sysresccd.org/Main_Page ? It's based on
> >>>>>Gentoo, you could check what they did to boot from a usb stick.
> >>>>>
> >>>>>Br,
> >>>>>Maciej Grela
> >>>>Excellent, thanks for that, I hadn't found it in my previous
> >>>>searches. I'll have a look there.
> >>>>
> >>>>Jake Moe
> >>>Had a similar issue a while ago when I was playing around with this
> >>>myself.
> >>>
> >>>Take a look at the linux boot parameters.
> >>>
> >>>The 'theoretical' part is: You need to let the kernel initialize the
> >>>USB-stick before trying to access it. (This can take some time)
> >>>
> >>>There is a delay-option, just can't remember the proper name off-hand.
> >>>
> >>>--
> >>>Joost
> >>I've got USB booting working in a syslinux environment. A delay of 12
> >>seconds is working for me. The syslinux.cfg stanza I use is:
> >>
> >>LABEL usb
> >>KERNEL linux
> >>APPEND rootdelay=12 root=/dev/sda2
> >The usual way for linux on removable usb sticks / disks is to use LABEL
> >or UUID to identify the disks and not the device names, because they
> >will be different in different computers The downside is that you
> >need an initrd to mount the root partition... I think that the usual
> >initrd generated by genkernel works...
> >
> >If you created the rootfs with:
> >mkfs.ext2 -j -LUSBGentoo /dev/sdXY
> >
> >then you can change the kernel parameter to
> >root=LABEL=USBGentoo
> >
> >and your fstab to:
> >LABEL=USBGentoo / ext3 ...
> >
> >You can also use the uuid of the filesystem, find it out with
> >dumpe2fs -h /dev/sdb2 | grep UUID
> >and then use UUID=XXX instead of LABEL=XXX
> >
> >I never really played around with grub and USB booting, so I use
> >syslinux. I create a small FAT partition with syslinux, kernel and
> >initrd image (it gets also pretty handy when you sometimes need to copy
> >something from a windows machine and a second "regular" ext3
> >partition for the rootfs.
> >
> >Basically you would do:
> >- partition the stick, mark the FAT partition as bootable/active
> >- format the partitions:
> > - mkfs.vfat -nUSBData /dev/sdX1
> > - mkfs.ext2 -j -LUSBGentoo /dev/sdX2
> >- install syslinux (on the FAT partition):
> > - syslinux /dev/sdX1
> >- mount /dev/sdX2, install gentoo in the usual way
> >- compile the kernel and initrd, make sure required USB stuff is in the kernel
> > (theoretically it could be as modules in initrd... but in-kernel is safer
> > if you are in a hurry, or don't know how to create them, get them from
> > a gentoo livecd don't forget to also copy the modules
> > (/lib/modules-XXX/...) from the livecd to the rootfs.
> >- put the kernel and initrd on the FAT partition (I name them vmlinuz.img
> > and initrd.img)
> >- edit syslinux.cfg (on the FAT partition), see
> > http://syslinux.zytor.com/wiki/index.php/SYSLINUX#How_do_I_Configure_SYSLINUX.3F
> > a very simple one from my USB disk:
> >
> >DEFAULT linux
> >LABEL linux
> >SAY Now booting USBGentoo
> >KERNEL vmlinuz.img
> >APPEND root=LABEL=USBGentoo initrd=initrd.img
> >
> >you might also add rootdelay=10 to the options if the usb stick/disk isn't
> >detected quick enough
> >
> >umount, reboot, set the computer to boot from usb, enjoy...
> >Xorg without a config seems to work pretty well on most computers these
> >days, IIRC the alsa modules for soundcards are also autoloaded, so you
> >don't need any fancy hw detection to have a desktop running from USB
> >stick
> >
> >
> >yoyo
> >
> >
> >
> >BTW there is also a "manual" way to boot even without an initrd: use
> >LABEL=XXX in your fstab, on the kernel command line use root=/dev/sda2
> >(or whatever you think will be more probable on you machines
> >then try to boot it, if it is wrong, you can enter the corrent
> >"root=/dev/sdX2" param in the syslinux prompt (you can either look up the
> >correct device in the boot messages, or just try sda, sdb, sdc, ...
> >You could also create menu options for the usual cases... (sda...sdf
> >shoud be more than enough...
> >You can however accidentally mount a rootfs from one of the disks on the
> >computer and thus booting the system on the computer, just with your
> >kernel...
> >
> >
> >
> >
> Thanks for that. I originally tried with "LABEL=UsbRoot" in both
> GRUB and fstab, but it couldn't find it, so I put it in a system
> that I'd pulled the hard drive from, so I could test if it'd work
> with /dev/sda instead. Neither method works; it just doesn't seem
> to see the USB storage in /dev. When I try by label, I get what's
> in the attached error.
>
> I've had a quick look at SYSLINUX (and it's counterpart, EXTLINUX),
> and it appears to really be nothing more than another bootloader
> like LILO or GRUB. Is that the case? If so, I might try and
> overwrite GRUB with EXTLINUX and see if that works; it appears that
> it should be that easy. Most of the USB booting doco I can find
> seems to want SYSLINUX anyway; maybe I'll give it a try. I had
> thought that a USB storage device is storage like anything else, so
> a "standard" install should work. Maybe it doesn't...

Yes, syslinux is just another "bootloader" It his however
specifically created for removable disks. I don't know how exactly grub
works and how it handles "removable" disk (ie when the disk appears at
different places) when finding devices for its root partition and the
root option for kernel...

>
> Jake Moe

> >> Activiating mdev
> >> Determining root device...
> /init: line 477: blkid: not found

seems like your initrd is missing the blkid program (used to determine
the labels and uuids of disks...)
Looking at the genkernel help it seems to ethis option:
--disklabel Include disk label and uuid support in your
ramdisk

> !! Could not find the root block device in LABEL=UsbRoot.
> Please specify another value or: press Enter for hte same, type "shell" for a
> shell, or "q" to skip...
> root block device(LABEL=UsbRoot) :: /dev/sda1
> >> Mounting root...
> >> Booting (initramfs)..
> INIT: version 2.87 booting
>
> Gentoo Linux; http://www.gentoo.org/
> Copyright 1999-2009 Gentoo Foundation; Distributed under teh GPLv2
>
> Press I to enter interactive boot mode
>
> * Mounting proc at /proc ... [ ok ]
> * Mounting sysfs at /sys ... [ ok ]
> * Mounting /dev ... [ ok ]
> * Starting udevd ... [ ok ]
> * Populating /dev with existing devices through uevents ... [ ok ]
> * Waiting for uevents to be processed ... [ ok ]
> * Mounting devpts at /dev/pts ... [ ok ]
> * Checking root filesystem ...
> fsck.ext2: Unable to resolve 'LABEL=UsbRoot'
This means fsck was unable to find the filesystem with that label.
You can use dumpe2fs /dev/yourpartition to check if the filesystem
really has the cooret label (look for "Filesystem volume name" at the
top)

> * Filesystem couldn't be fixed [ !! ]
> Give root password for maintenance
> (or type Control-D to continue):

yoyo
 
Old 09-15-2010, 10:03 PM
Jake Moe
 
Default Booting Gentoo from USB stick

On 15/09/10 20:10, YoYo Siska wrote:
> On Wed, Sep 15, 2010 at 08:34:33AM +1000, Jake Moe wrote:
>> On 15/09/10 04:28, YoYo Siska wrote:
>>> On Fri, Sep 10, 2010 at 07:29:01AM -0400, David Relson wrote:
>>>> On Fri, 10 Sep 2010 11:05:12 +0200
>>>> J. Roeleveld wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On Friday 10 September 2010 10:43:30 Jake Moe wrote:
>>>>>> On 10/09/2010 5:27 PM, Maciej Grela wrote:
>>>>>>> 2010/9/10 Jake Moe<jakesaddress@gmail.com>:
>>>>>>>> Hello all,
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I've been thinking about creating a Gentoo USB stick for install
>>>>>>>> and rescue purposes (and, of course, just to see if I could).
>>>>>>>> I've mostly followed the Gentoo handbook (I used a single 4GB
>>>>>>>> partition for the whole system, and no swap). I've used
>>>>>>>> genkernel for the kernel (so I can have a multi-system capable
>>>>>>>> kernel). I've gotten GRUB installed and working. My problem
>>>>>>>> comes in after what I believe is the init process:
>>>>>>>> * Checking root filesystem ...
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> fsck.ext2: No such file or directory while trying to
>>>>>>>> open /dev/sda1 /dev/sda1:
>>>>>>>> The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct
>>>>>>>> ext2 filesystem. If the device is valid and it really contains
>>>>>>>> an ext2 filesystem (and not swap or ufs or something else), then
>>>>>>>> the superblock
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> is corrupt, and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate
>>>>> superblock:
>>>>>>>> e2fsck -b 8193<device>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> * Filesystem couldn't be
>>>>>>>> fixed [
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> !! ]
>>>>>>>> Give root password for maintenance
>>>>>>>> (or type Control-D to continue):
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> If I give the root password, I can find no /dev/sda1. However,
>>>>>>>> mount shows /dev/sda1 on /, and there *is* a /sys/block/sda
>>>>>>>> folders, with a sda1 folder in that as well. It's almost like
>>>>>>>> it had /dev/sda1, but then lost it somehow.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Does anyone have any idea what's going on here? Any help would
>>>>>>>> be appreciated.
>>>>>>> Have you seen http://www.sysresccd.org/Main_Page ? It's based on
>>>>>>> Gentoo, you could check what they did to boot from a usb stick.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Br,
>>>>>>> Maciej Grela
>>>>>> Excellent, thanks for that, I hadn't found it in my previous
>>>>>> searches. I'll have a look there.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Jake Moe
>>>>> Had a similar issue a while ago when I was playing around with this
>>>>> myself.
>>>>>
>>>>> Take a look at the linux boot parameters.
>>>>>
>>>>> The 'theoretical' part is: You need to let the kernel initialize the
>>>>> USB-stick before trying to access it. (This can take some time)
>>>>>
>>>>> There is a delay-option, just can't remember the proper name off-hand.
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> Joost
>>>> I've got USB booting working in a syslinux environment. A delay of 12
>>>> seconds is working for me. The syslinux.cfg stanza I use is:
>>>>
>>>> LABEL usb
>>>> KERNEL linux
>>>> APPEND rootdelay=12 root=/dev/sda2
>>> The usual way for linux on removable usb sticks / disks is to use LABEL
>>> or UUID to identify the disks and not the device names, because they
>>> will be different in different computers The downside is that you
>>> need an initrd to mount the root partition... I think that the usual
>>> initrd generated by genkernel works...
>>>
>>> If you created the rootfs with:
>>> mkfs.ext2 -j -LUSBGentoo /dev/sdXY
>>>
>>> then you can change the kernel parameter to
>>> root=LABEL=USBGentoo
>>>
>>> and your fstab to:
>>> LABEL=USBGentoo / ext3 ...
>>>
>>> You can also use the uuid of the filesystem, find it out with
>>> dumpe2fs -h /dev/sdb2 | grep UUID
>>> and then use UUID=XXX instead of LABEL=XXX
>>>
>>> I never really played around with grub and USB booting, so I use
>>> syslinux. I create a small FAT partition with syslinux, kernel and
>>> initrd image (it gets also pretty handy when you sometimes need to copy
>>> something from a windows machine and a second "regular" ext3
>>> partition for the rootfs.
>>>
>>> Basically you would do:
>>> - partition the stick, mark the FAT partition as bootable/active
>>> - format the partitions:
>>> - mkfs.vfat -nUSBData /dev/sdX1
>>> - mkfs.ext2 -j -LUSBGentoo /dev/sdX2
>>> - install syslinux (on the FAT partition):
>>> - syslinux /dev/sdX1
>>> - mount /dev/sdX2, install gentoo in the usual way
>>> - compile the kernel and initrd, make sure required USB stuff is in the kernel
>>> (theoretically it could be as modules in initrd... but in-kernel is safer
>>> if you are in a hurry, or don't know how to create them, get them from
>>> a gentoo livecd don't forget to also copy the modules
>>> (/lib/modules-XXX/...) from the livecd to the rootfs.
>>> - put the kernel and initrd on the FAT partition (I name them vmlinuz.img
>>> and initrd.img)
>>> - edit syslinux.cfg (on the FAT partition), see
>>> http://syslinux.zytor.com/wiki/index.php/SYSLINUX#How_do_I_Configure_SYSLINUX.3F
>>> a very simple one from my USB disk:
>>>
>>> DEFAULT linux
>>> LABEL linux
>>> SAY Now booting USBGentoo
>>> KERNEL vmlinuz.img
>>> APPEND root=LABEL=USBGentoo initrd=initrd.img
>>>
>>> you might also add rootdelay=10 to the options if the usb stick/disk isn't
>>> detected quick enough
>>>
>>> umount, reboot, set the computer to boot from usb, enjoy...
>>> Xorg without a config seems to work pretty well on most computers these
>>> days, IIRC the alsa modules for soundcards are also autoloaded, so you
>>> don't need any fancy hw detection to have a desktop running from USB
>>> stick
>>>
>>>
>>> yoyo
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> BTW there is also a "manual" way to boot even without an initrd: use
>>> LABEL=XXX in your fstab, on the kernel command line use root=/dev/sda2
>>> (or whatever you think will be more probable on you machines
>>> then try to boot it, if it is wrong, you can enter the corrent
>>> "root=/dev/sdX2" param in the syslinux prompt (you can either look up the
>>> correct device in the boot messages, or just try sda, sdb, sdc, ...
>>> You could also create menu options for the usual cases... (sda...sdf
>>> shoud be more than enough...
>>> You can however accidentally mount a rootfs from one of the disks on the
>>> computer and thus booting the system on the computer, just with your
>>> kernel...
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>> Thanks for that. I originally tried with "LABEL=UsbRoot" in both
>> GRUB and fstab, but it couldn't find it, so I put it in a system
>> that I'd pulled the hard drive from, so I could test if it'd work
>> with /dev/sda instead. Neither method works; it just doesn't seem
>> to see the USB storage in /dev. When I try by label, I get what's
>> in the attached error.
>>
>> I've had a quick look at SYSLINUX (and it's counterpart, EXTLINUX),
>> and it appears to really be nothing more than another bootloader
>> like LILO or GRUB. Is that the case? If so, I might try and
>> overwrite GRUB with EXTLINUX and see if that works; it appears that
>> it should be that easy. Most of the USB booting doco I can find
>> seems to want SYSLINUX anyway; maybe I'll give it a try. I had
>> thought that a USB storage device is storage like anything else, so
>> a "standard" install should work. Maybe it doesn't...
> Yes, syslinux is just another "bootloader" It his however
> specifically created for removable disks. I don't know how exactly grub
> works and how it handles "removable" disk (ie when the disk appears at
> different places) when finding devices for its root partition and the
> root option for kernel...
>
>> Jake Moe
>>>> Activiating mdev
>>>> Determining root device...
>> /init: line 477: blkid: not found
> seems like your initrd is missing the blkid program (used to determine
> the labels and uuids of disks...)
> Looking at the genkernel help it seems to ethis option:
> --disklabel Include disk label and uuid support in your
> ramdisk
>
>> !! Could not find the root block device in LABEL=UsbRoot.
>> Please specify another value or: press Enter for hte same, type "shell" for a
>> shell, or "q" to skip...
>> root block device(LABEL=UsbRoot) :: /dev/sda1
>>>> Mounting root...
>>>> Booting (initramfs)..
>> INIT: version 2.87 booting
>>
>> Gentoo Linux; http://www.gentoo.org/
>> Copyright 1999-2009 Gentoo Foundation; Distributed under teh GPLv2
>>
>> Press I to enter interactive boot mode
>>
>> * Mounting proc at /proc ... [ ok ]
>> * Mounting sysfs at /sys ... [ ok ]
>> * Mounting /dev ... [ ok ]
>> * Starting udevd ... [ ok ]
>> * Populating /dev with existing devices through uevents ... [ ok ]
>> * Waiting for uevents to be processed ... [ ok ]
>> * Mounting devpts at /dev/pts ... [ ok ]
>> * Checking root filesystem ...
>> fsck.ext2: Unable to resolve 'LABEL=UsbRoot'
> This means fsck was unable to find the filesystem with that label.
> You can use dumpe2fs /dev/yourpartition to check if the filesystem
> really has the cooret label (look for "Filesystem volume name" at the
> top)
>
>> * Filesystem couldn't be fixed [ !! ]
>> Give root password for maintenance
>> (or type Control-D to continue):
> yoyo
>
Thanks for that, I'll rebuild the genkernel with blkid support.

As to the second suggestion, there is *no* /dev/sda1 (the partition in
question). It just doesn't exist for some reason. However, fstab shows
that it's mounted, and /sys/block has entries for the disk, so I'm not
sure why it's dropped out. I'm guessing it has something to do with
udevd, or uevents? Because shortly before that, I tell it to find the
root partition at /dev/sda1, and it starts to boot, but then it loses it.

Jake Moe
 
Old 09-15-2010, 10:18 PM
Al
 
Default Booting Gentoo from USB stick

>
> As to the second suggestion, there is *no* /dev/sda1 (the partition in
> question). *It just doesn't exist for some reason. *However, fstab shows
> that it's mounted, and /sys/block has entries for the disk, so I'm not
> sure why it's dropped out. *I'm guessing it has something to do with
> udevd, or uevents? *Because shortly before that, I tell it to find the
> root partition at /dev/sda1, and it starts to boot, but then it loses it.
>

What is that in concrete, it starts? What do you see, hear, smell?

Al
 
Old 09-15-2010, 10:26 PM
Dale
 
Default Booting Gentoo from USB stick

Jake Moe wrote:

Thanks for that, I'll rebuild the genkernel with blkid support.

As to the second suggestion, there is *no* /dev/sda1 (the partition in
question). It just doesn't exist for some reason. However, fstab shows
that it's mounted, and /sys/block has entries for the disk, so I'm not
sure why it's dropped out. I'm guessing it has something to do with
udevd, or uevents? Because shortly before that, I tell it to find the
root partition at /dev/sda1, and it starts to boot, but then it loses it.

Jake Moe




The file fstab doesn't show what is mounted. Either use the command
"mount" with no options or cat /etc/mtab to see what is actually mounted.


Dale

:-) :-)
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 10:48 PM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org