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Dale 08-27-2010 07:37 AM

Old IDE drives and the "newer" PATA kernel drivers
 
Hi folks,

I been putting this off but it looks like the newer kernels are going to
push me to changing this real soon. I have a older system, Abit NF7 2.0
motherboard with the older IDE drives. I'm still using the older IDE
drivers. This is what I have currently:


hda Actual hard drive OS on this
hdb Actual hard drive Not in use
hdc Actual hard drive home partition
hdd DVD burner Duh! It's a burner.
sda Actual hard drive connected through a SATA PCI card. Misc stuff.


So, hda has the Gentoo OS on it and hdc is my /hone directory. I have
videos, mp3's and various other data on sda. Currently hdb is not
being used, since for those who keep up with my threads would know, it
is the one that is terribly slow. Something along the lines of
10Mbs/sec or something of that nature. It's just hard to get out of
the case right now and I can't get to it with a hammer either. :/


My theory is something like this: hda will become sda; hdb will become
sdb; hdc will become sdc; hdd will become sdd; and sda will become
sde. Would that be a logical expectation? Anybody see anything that
may cause a hiccup on this change? I know I have to update fstab before
rebooting. I may also have a sledge hammer or a really big shotgun
close by, just in case it gets any bad ideas like messing up /home. ;-)


I'm currently using this:

AMD and nVidia IDE support

This would be the new, possibly improved, version of things:

AMD/NVidia PATA support

Correct?

I'm just wanting to cover a few bases and make sure I am on the right
track and understand things before I blow up something.


Thanks.

Dale

:-) :-)

Nikos Chantziaras 08-27-2010 07:49 AM

Old IDE drives and the "newer" PATA kernel drivers
 
On 08/27/2010 10:37 AM, Dale wrote:

Hi folks,

I been putting this off but it looks like the newer kernels are going to
push me to changing this real soon. I have a older system, Abit NF7 2.0
motherboard with the older IDE drives. I'm still using the older IDE
drivers. This is what I have currently:

hda Actual hard drive OS on this
hdb Actual hard drive Not in use
hdc Actual hard drive home partition
hdd DVD burner Duh! It's a burner.
sda Actual hard drive connected through a SATA PCI card. Misc stuff.


So, hda has the Gentoo OS on it and hdc is my /hone directory. I have
videos, mp3's and various other data on sda. Currently hdb is not being
used, since for those who keep up with my threads would know, it is the
one that is terribly slow. Something along the lines of 10Mbs/sec or
something of that nature. It's just hard to get out of the case right
now and I can't get to it with a hammer either. :/


You can at least disconnect it then. Right now all it does and eat
power, heat the case and make noise :-/




My theory is something like this: hda will become sda; hdb will become
sdb; hdc will become sdc; hdd will become sdd; and sda will become sde.
Would that be a logical expectation?


I'd say sda will stay as is, hda will become sdb, and so forth.

Anyway, make sure you have a bootable Linux CD/DVD handy. That way, you
won't be able to blow anything up and can boot from it in order to
change your /etc/fstab and grub conf.

"J. Roeleveld" 08-27-2010 08:10 AM

Old IDE drives and the "newer" PATA kernel drivers
 
On Friday 27 August 2010 09:49:41 Nikos Chantziaras wrote:
> On 08/27/2010 10:37 AM, Dale wrote:
> > Hi folks,
> >
> > I been putting this off but it looks like the newer kernels are going to
> > push me to changing this real soon. I have a older system, Abit NF7 2.0
> > motherboard with the older IDE drives. I'm still using the older IDE
> > drivers. This is what I have currently:
> >
> > hda Actual hard drive OS on this
> > hdb Actual hard drive Not in use
> > hdc Actual hard drive home partition
> > hdd DVD burner Duh! It's a burner.
> > sda Actual hard drive connected through a SATA PCI card. Misc stuff.
> >
> >
> > So, hda has the Gentoo OS on it and hdc is my /hone directory. I have
> > videos, mp3's and various other data on sda. Currently hdb is not being
> > used, since for those who keep up with my threads would know, it is the
> > one that is terribly slow. Something along the lines of 10Mbs/sec or
> > something of that nature. It's just hard to get out of the case right
> > now and I can't get to it with a hammer either. :/
>
> You can at least disconnect it then. Right now all it does and eat
> power, heat the case and make noise :-/
>
> > My theory is something like this: hda will become sda; hdb will become
> > sdb; hdc will become sdc; hdd will become sdd; and sda will become sde.
> > Would that be a logical expectation?
>
> I'd say sda will stay as is, hda will become sdb, and so forth.
>
> Anyway, make sure you have a bootable Linux CD/DVD handy. That way, you
> won't be able to blow anything up and can boot from it in order to
> change your /etc/fstab and grub conf.

Alternatively, give your partitions Labels and reconfigure /etc/fstab to use
those.
Then you don't have to worry about the changes to the device-names.

--
Joost

Jesús J. Guerrero Botella 08-27-2010 08:23 AM

Old IDE drives and the "newer" PATA kernel drivers
 
2010/8/27 J. Roeleveld <joost@antarean.org>:
> On Friday 27 August 2010 09:49:41 Nikos Chantziaras wrote:
>> On 08/27/2010 10:37 AM, Dale wrote:
>> > Hi folks,
>> >
>> > I been putting this off but it looks like the newer kernels are going to
>> > push me to changing this real soon. I have a older system, Abit NF7 2.0
>> > motherboard with the older IDE drives. I'm still using the older IDE
>> > drivers. This is what I have currently:
>> >
>> > hda Actual hard drive OS on this
>> > hdb Actual hard drive Not in use
>> > hdc Actual hard drive home partition
>> > hdd DVD burner Duh! It's a burner.
>> > sda Actual hard drive connected through a SATA PCI card. Misc stuff.
>> >
>> >
>> > So, hda has the Gentoo OS on it and hdc is my /hone directory. I have
>> > videos, mp3's and various other data on sda. Currently hdb is not being
>> > used, since for those who keep up with my threads would know, it is the
>> > one that is terribly slow. Something along the lines of 10Mbs/sec or
>> > something of that nature. It's just hard to get out of the case right
>> > now and I can't get to it with a hammer either. :/
>>
>> You can at least disconnect it then. *Right now all it does and eat
>> power, heat the case and make noise :-/
>>
>> > My theory is something like this: hda will become sda; hdb will become
>> > sdb; hdc will become sdc; hdd will become sdd; and sda will become sde.
>> > Would that be a logical expectation?
>>
>> I'd say sda will stay as is, hda will become sdb, and so forth.

This entirely depends on the way your BIOS orders your drivers, as far
as I know. It could be either way. But, we all know how flexible grub
is. You can just use TAB to autocomplete and try. All you need to boot
is your root fs, after that fdisk -l will reveal all the info you
need. fstab is another story, that might cost you an extra reboot into
a livecd to fix it.

But, using labels as said will fix all the problems (beforehand) for
you, as said.


--
Jesús Guerrero Botella

Nikos Chantziaras 08-27-2010 08:50 AM

Old IDE drives and the "newer" PATA kernel drivers
 
On 08/27/2010 10:37 AM, Dale wrote:

I been putting this off but it looks like the newer kernels are going to
push me to changing this real soon. I have a older system, Abit NF7 2.0
motherboard with the older IDE drives. I'm still using the older IDE
drivers. This is what I have currently:

hda Actual hard drive OS on this
hdb Actual hard drive Not in use
hdc Actual hard drive home partition
hdd DVD burner Duh! It's a burner.
sda Actual hard drive connected through a SATA PCI card. Misc stuff.


The advice by the other posters to label your disks is a good one. I'm
using labels too. Not sure why I didn't think to mention it :P


Applying labels to your filesystems is trivial. Simply use the e2label
utility (it's in the sys-fs/e2fsprogs package and installed by default,
so there's nothing new to emerge). For example, if your hda1 is your
root partition and your hda2 your swap, you can label them like this:


e2label /dev/hda1 GentooRoot
e2label /dev/hda2 GentooSwap

Note: hda1, not just hda. You are labeling the filesystem on a
partition, not the whole drive.


After you label all your filesystems, you simply modify your /etc/fstab
like this:


Before:
/dev/hda1 / ext4 noatime 0 1
/dev/hda2 none swap sw 0 0

After:
/dev/disk/by-label/GentooRoot / ext4 noatime 0 1
/dev/disk/by-label/GentooSwap none swap sw 0 0

That is, you simply change "/dev/blah" to
"/dev/disk/by-label/DriveLabel" and that's it.

Jesús J. Guerrero Botella 08-27-2010 09:00 AM

Old IDE drives and the "newer" PATA kernel drivers
 
2010/8/27 Nikos Chantziaras <realnc@arcor.de>:
> On 08/27/2010 10:37 AM, Dale wrote:
>>
>> I been putting this off but it looks like the newer kernels are going to
>> push me to changing this real soon. I have a older system, Abit NF7 2.0
>> motherboard with the older IDE drives. I'm still using the older IDE
>> drivers. This is what I have currently:
>>
>> hda Actual hard drive OS on this
>> hdb Actual hard drive Not in use
>> hdc Actual hard drive home partition
>> hdd DVD burner Duh! It's a burner.
>> sda Actual hard drive connected through a SATA PCI card. Misc stuff.
>
> The advice by the other posters to label your disks is a good one. *I'm
> using labels too. *Not sure why I didn't think to mention it :P
>
> Applying labels to your filesystems is trivial. *Simply use the e2label
> utility (it's in the sys-fs/e2fsprogs package and installed by default, so
> there's nothing new to emerge). *For example, if your hda1 is your root
> partition and your hda2 your swap, you can label them like this:
>
> *e2label /dev/hda1 GentooRoot
> *e2label /dev/hda2 GentooSwap
>
> Note: hda1, not just hda. *You are labeling the filesystem on a partition,
> not the whole drive.
>
> After you label all your filesystems, you simply modify your /etc/fstab like
> this:
>
> Before:
> /dev/hda1 */ *ext4 *noatime *0 1
> /dev/hda2 *none *swap *sw *0 0
>
> After:
> /dev/disk/by-label/GentooRoot */ *ext4 *noatime *0 1
> /dev/disk/by-label/GentooSwap *none *swap *sw 0 0
>
> That is, you simply change "/dev/blah" to "/dev/disk/by-label/DriveLabel"
> and that's it.
>
>
>
Or you can do it by uuid, all the info you need can be picked from this output:

$ ls /dev/disk/by-uuid/ -l

Then just add lines to fstab like this:

UUID="6ea2b219-0bcc-4c90-9960-82a9659e6d0e" / ext4 noatime 0 1
--
Jesús Guerrero Botella

"J. Roeleveld" 08-27-2010 09:37 AM

Old IDE drives and the "newer" PATA kernel drivers
 
On Friday 27 August 2010 11:00:58 Jesús J. Guerrero Botella wrote:
> 2010/8/27 Nikos Chantziaras <realnc@arcor.de>:
> > On 08/27/2010 10:37 AM, Dale wrote:
> >> I been putting this off but it looks like the newer kernels are going to
> >> push me to changing this real soon. I have a older system, Abit NF7 2.0
> >> motherboard with the older IDE drives. I'm still using the older IDE
> >> drivers. This is what I have currently:
> >>
> >> hda Actual hard drive OS on this
> >> hdb Actual hard drive Not in use
> >> hdc Actual hard drive home partition
> >> hdd DVD burner Duh! It's a burner.
> >> sda Actual hard drive connected through a SATA PCI card. Misc stuff.
> >
> > The advice by the other posters to label your disks is a good one. I'm
> > using labels too. Not sure why I didn't think to mention it :P
> >
> > Applying labels to your filesystems is trivial. Simply use the e2label
> > utility (it's in the sys-fs/e2fsprogs package and installed by default,
> > so there's nothing new to emerge). For example, if your hda1 is your
> > root partition and your hda2 your swap, you can label them like this:
> >
> > e2label /dev/hda1 GentooRoot
> > e2label /dev/hda2 GentooSwap
> >
> > Note: hda1, not just hda. You are labeling the filesystem on a
> > partition, not the whole drive.
> >
> > After you label all your filesystems, you simply modify your /etc/fstab
> > like this:
> >
> > Before:
> > /dev/hda1 / ext4 noatime 0 1
> > /dev/hda2 none swap sw 0 0
> >
> > After:
> > /dev/disk/by-label/GentooRoot / ext4 noatime 0 1
> > /dev/disk/by-label/GentooSwap none swap sw 0 0
> >
> > That is, you simply change "/dev/blah" to "/dev/disk/by-label/DriveLabel"
> > and that's it.
>
> Or you can do it by uuid, all the info you need can be picked from this
> output:
>
> $ ls /dev/disk/by-uuid/ -l
>
> Then just add lines to fstab like this:
>
> UUID="6ea2b219-0bcc-4c90-9960-82a9659e6d0e" / ext4 noatime 0 1

True, except that for mere mortals, Labels are slightly easier to read and
understand :)

And that, I find, is less prone to mistakes.

--
Joost

Dale 08-27-2010 09:44 AM

Old IDE drives and the "newer" PATA kernel drivers
 
Jesús J. Guerrero Botella wrote:

2010/8/27 J. Roeleveld<joost@antarean.org>:


On Friday 27 August 2010 09:49:41 Nikos Chantziaras wrote:


On 08/27/2010 10:37 AM, Dale wrote:


Hi folks,

I been putting this off but it looks like the newer kernels are going to
push me to changing this real soon. I have a older system, Abit NF7 2.0
motherboard with the older IDE drives. I'm still using the older IDE
drivers. This is what I have currently:

hda Actual hard drive OS on this
hdb Actual hard drive Not in use
hdc Actual hard drive home partition
hdd DVD burner Duh! It's a burner.
sda Actual hard drive connected through a SATA PCI card. Misc stuff.


So, hda has the Gentoo OS on it and hdc is my /hone directory. I have
videos, mp3's and various other data on sda. Currently hdb is not being
used, since for those who keep up with my threads would know, it is the
one that is terribly slow. Something along the lines of 10Mbs/sec or
something of that nature. It's just hard to get out of the case right
now and I can't get to it with a hammer either. :/


You can at least disconnect it then. Right now all it does and eat
power, heat the case and make noise :-/



My theory is something like this: hda will become sda; hdb will become
sdb; hdc will become sdc; hdd will become sdd; and sda will become sde.
Would that be a logical expectation?


I'd say sda will stay as is, hda will become sdb, and so forth.


This entirely depends on the way your BIOS orders your drivers, as far
as I know. It could be either way. But, we all know how flexible grub
is. You can just use TAB to autocomplete and try. All you need to boot
is your root fs, after that fdisk -l will reveal all the info you
need. fstab is another story, that might cost you an extra reboot into
a livecd to fix it.

But, using labels as said will fix all the problems (beforehand) for
you, as said.





I have heard of the labels before but never used them. I need to google
that and see how that is done.


Another thing that I hadn't thought of, grub. I didn't even think about
grub would have to be edited. That would have been interesting when I
tried to boot up.


Thanks.

Dale

:-) :-)

Dale 08-27-2010 09:49 AM

Old IDE drives and the "newer" PATA kernel drivers
 
J. Roeleveld wrote:

On Friday 27 August 2010 11:00:58 Jesús J. Guerrero Botella wrote:


2010/8/27 Nikos Chantziaras<realnc@arcor.de>:


On 08/27/2010 10:37 AM, Dale wrote:


I been putting this off but it looks like the newer kernels are going to
push me to changing this real soon. I have a older system, Abit NF7 2.0
motherboard with the older IDE drives. I'm still using the older IDE
drivers. This is what I have currently:

hda Actual hard drive OS on this
hdb Actual hard drive Not in use
hdc Actual hard drive home partition
hdd DVD burner Duh! It's a burner.
sda Actual hard drive connected through a SATA PCI card. Misc stuff.


The advice by the other posters to label your disks is a good one. I'm
using labels too. Not sure why I didn't think to mention it :P

Applying labels to your filesystems is trivial. Simply use the e2label
utility (it's in the sys-fs/e2fsprogs package and installed by default,
so there's nothing new to emerge). For example, if your hda1 is your
root partition and your hda2 your swap, you can label them like this:

e2label /dev/hda1 GentooRoot
e2label /dev/hda2 GentooSwap

Note: hda1, not just hda. You are labeling the filesystem on a
partition, not the whole drive.

After you label all your filesystems, you simply modify your /etc/fstab
like this:

Before:
/dev/hda1 / ext4 noatime 0 1
/dev/hda2 none swap sw 0 0

After:
/dev/disk/by-label/GentooRoot / ext4 noatime 0 1
/dev/disk/by-label/GentooSwap none swap sw 0 0

That is, you simply change "/dev/blah" to "/dev/disk/by-label/DriveLabel"
and that's it.


Or you can do it by uuid, all the info you need can be picked from this
output:

$ ls /dev/disk/by-uuid/ -l

Then just add lines to fstab like this:

UUID="6ea2b219-0bcc-4c90-9960-82a9659e6d0e" / ext4 noatime 0 1


True, except that for mere mortals, Labels are slightly easier to read and
understand :)

And that, I find, is less prone to mistakes.

--
Joost





Hmmm, I use resierfs for my file systems, most of them anyway. I still
use e2fsprogs to change those?


Is there a way to boot a Gentoo/Knoppix CD and make it use the PATA
drivers? That way I can boot it and see exactly how it will name them
and what drive is what without actually changing anything at all. Is
there a boot option "noide" or some other switch I can use?


Dale

:-) :-)

"J. Roeleveld" 08-27-2010 09:56 AM

Old IDE drives and the "newer" PATA kernel drivers
 
On Friday 27 August 2010 11:49:00 Dale wrote:
> J. Roeleveld wrote:
> > On Friday 27 August 2010 11:00:58 Jesús J. Guerrero Botella wrote:
> >> 2010/8/27 Nikos Chantziaras<realnc@arcor.de>:
> >>> On 08/27/2010 10:37 AM, Dale wrote:
> >>>> I been putting this off but it looks like the newer kernels are going
> >>>> to push me to changing this real soon. I have a older system, Abit
> >>>> NF7 2.0 motherboard with the older IDE drives. I'm still using the
> >>>> older IDE drivers. This is what I have currently:
> >>>>
> >>>> hda Actual hard drive OS on this
> >>>> hdb Actual hard drive Not in use
> >>>> hdc Actual hard drive home partition
> >>>> hdd DVD burner Duh! It's a burner.
> >>>> sda Actual hard drive connected through a SATA PCI card. Misc stuff.
> >>>
> >>> The advice by the other posters to label your disks is a good one. I'm
> >>> using labels too. Not sure why I didn't think to mention it :P
> >>>
> >>> Applying labels to your filesystems is trivial. Simply use the e2label
> >>> utility (it's in the sys-fs/e2fsprogs package and installed by default,
> >>> so there's nothing new to emerge). For example, if your hda1 is your
> >>>
> >>> root partition and your hda2 your swap, you can label them like this:
> >>> e2label /dev/hda1 GentooRoot
> >>> e2label /dev/hda2 GentooSwap
> >>>
> >>> Note: hda1, not just hda. You are labeling the filesystem on a
> >>> partition, not the whole drive.
> >>>
> >>> After you label all your filesystems, you simply modify your /etc/fstab
> >>> like this:
> >>>
> >>> Before:
> >>> /dev/hda1 / ext4 noatime 0 1
> >>> /dev/hda2 none swap sw 0 0
> >>>
> >>> After:
> >>> /dev/disk/by-label/GentooRoot / ext4 noatime 0 1
> >>> /dev/disk/by-label/GentooSwap none swap sw 0 0
> >>>
> >>> That is, you simply change "/dev/blah" to
> >>> "/dev/disk/by-label/DriveLabel" and that's it.
> >>
> >> Or you can do it by uuid, all the info you need can be picked from this
> >> output:
> >>
> >> $ ls /dev/disk/by-uuid/ -l
> >>
> >> Then just add lines to fstab like this:
> >>
> >> UUID="6ea2b219-0bcc-4c90-9960-82a9659e6d0e" / ext4 noatime 0 1
> >
> > True, except that for mere mortals, Labels are slightly easier to read
> > and understand :)
> >
> > And that, I find, is less prone to mistakes.
> >
> > --
> > Joost
>
> Hmmm, I use resierfs for my file systems, most of them anyway. I still
> use e2fsprogs to change those?

Nope:
eve ~ # reiserfstune --help
reiserfstune: unrecognized option '--help'
reiserfstune: Usage: reiserfstune [options] device [block-count]

Options:

-j | --journal-device file current journal device
--journal-new-device file new journal device
-o | --journal-new-offset N new journal offset in blocks
-s | --journal-new-size N new journal size in blocks
-t | --trans-max-size N new journal max transaction size in blocks
--no-journal-available current journal is not available
--make-journal-standard new journal to be standard
-b | --add-badblocks file add to bad block list
-B | --badblocks file set the bad block list
-u | --uuid UUID|random set new UUID
-l | --label LABEL set new label
-f | --force force tuning, less confirmations
-V print version and exit

IOW (as example):
reiserfstune -l ROOTDISK /dev/hda1

> Is there a way to boot a Gentoo/Knoppix CD and make it use the PATA
> drivers? That way I can boot it and see exactly how it will name them
> and what drive is what without actually changing anything at all. Is
> there a boot option "noide" or some other switch I can use?

Afraid not.
The naming scheme is, officially, not constant and can change with reboots.

On my server, with hotswap, I get different device-names when I remove a disk
and plug it back in.
Eg. /dev/sdb -> /dev/sdj
(as example)
Don't think you'll have that particular issue, but having these names change
between reboots is possible. Especially if a drive fails and is not found
during boot or a new drive is added.

Not tested, but I believe USB-drives might also get pushed into the mix?

--
Joost


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