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Old 08-25-2010, 03:36 AM
"Kevin O'Gorman"
 
Default Feckless xdm not much of a manager

I'm actually working to integrate a new HD monitor in a system built before HD was invented.* The monitor works better than the old one, but just in 4:3 aspect mode.* But that's another thread, I only mention it so you know I'm as well off as I was before the old monitor fritzed out on me.


In order to make progress on this thing, it's useful to be able to control the display manager.* My problem has been that going to /etc/init.d
and commanding "./xdm stop" seems to work, but has no effect on KDE.* Manually killing kde (ps -ef | grep kde, etc) just starts another one.* I finally figured out that I have to find the 'kdm' process and kill that, then a logoff or Ctl_Alt_BS actually gets rid of X, so I can do things like

"X -configure" and so on.

Oddly, "./xdm start" worked fine, and was responsible for kdm being started. * But isn't it odd that the display "manager" has such weak
control on its "subordinate"?* Big PITA for me. *

Grrrrr.

--
Kevin O'Gorman, PhD
 
Old 08-25-2010, 03:55 AM
"Kevin O'Gorman"
 
Default Feckless xdm not much of a manager

On Tue, Aug 24, 2010 at 8:36 PM, Kevin O'Gorman <kogorman@gmail.com> wrote:

I'm actually working to integrate a new HD monitor in a system built before HD was invented.* The monitor works better than the old one, but just in 4:3 aspect mode.* But that's another thread, I only mention it so you know I'm as well off as I was before the old monitor fritzed out on me.



In order to make progress on this thing, it's useful to be able to control the display manager.* My problem has been that going to /etc/init.d
and commanding "./xdm stop" seems to work, but has no effect on KDE.* Manually killing kde (ps -ef | grep kde, etc) just starts another one.* I finally figured out that I have to find the 'kdm' process and kill that, then a logoff or Ctl_Alt_BS actually gets rid of X, so I can do things like


"X -configure" and so on.

Oddly, "./xdm start" worked fine, and was responsible for kdm being started. * But isn't it odd that the display "manager" has such weak
control on its "subordinate"?* Big PITA for me. *


Grrrrr.


The reason that some of this was in the past tense is that somehow I've gotten in a situation
where rebooting does _not_ start a display manager.* Fortunately, "./xdm start" still works --

it's just more PITA..

--
Kevin O'Gorman, PhD
 
Old 08-25-2010, 02:22 PM
Bill Longman
 
Default Feckless xdm not much of a manager

On 08/24/2010 08:36 PM, Kevin O'Gorman wrote:
> In order to make progress on this thing, it's useful to be able to
> control the display manager. My problem has been that going to /etc/init.d
> and commanding "./xdm stop" seems to work, but has no effect on KDE.
> Manually killing kde (ps -ef | grep kde, etc) just starts another one.
> I finally figured out that I have to find the 'kdm' process and kill
> that, then a logoff or Ctl_Alt_BS actually gets rid of X, so I can do
> things like
> "X -configure" and so on.

You ~should~ be able to log onto a console vty by using Ctrl-Alt-Fn
(where n=1-6). You can then log on from there and commence all manner of
Gentacular shelly goodness.

There's really no need to kill the display manager ever. In fact, you
can have more than one running at a time.

> Oddly, "./xdm start" worked fine, and was responsible for kdm being
> started. But isn't it odd that the display "manager" has such weak
> control on its "subordinate"? Big PITA for me.

Yeah, that's just a semantic problem, really. The generic term is "xdm"
but depending upon your setup, you can plug in any display manager.
 
Old 08-25-2010, 02:28 PM
Mick
 
Default Feckless xdm not much of a manager

On 25 August 2010 15:22, Bill Longman <bill.longman@gmail.com> wrote:
> On 08/24/2010 08:36 PM, Kevin O'Gorman wrote:
>> In order to make progress on this thing, it's useful to be able to
>> control the display manager. *My problem has been that going to /etc/init.d
>> and commanding "./xdm stop" seems to work, but has no effect on KDE.
>> Manually killing kde (ps -ef | grep kde, etc) just starts another one.
>> I finally figured out that I have to find the 'kdm' process and kill
>> that, then a logoff or Ctl_Alt_BS actually gets rid of X, so I can do
>> things like
>> "X -configure" and so on.
>
> You ~should~ be able to log onto a console vty by using Ctrl-Alt-Fn
> (where n=1-6). You can then log on from there and commence all manner of
> Gentacular shelly goodness.
>
> There's really no need to kill the display manager ever. In fact, you
> can have more than one running at a time.
>
>> Oddly, "./xdm start" worked fine, and was responsible for kdm being
>> started. * But isn't it odd that the display "manager" has such weak
>> control on its "subordinate"? *Big PITA for me.
>
> Yeah, that's just a semantic problem, really. The generic term is "xdm"
> but depending upon your setup, you can plug in any display manager.

Running /etc/init.d/xdm stop should kill kdm too. If it respawns,
then run /etc/init.d/xdm zap.
--
Regards,
Mick
 
Old 08-25-2010, 07:33 PM
"Kevin O'Gorman"
 
Default Feckless xdm not much of a manager

On Wed, Aug 25, 2010 at 7:22 AM, Bill Longman <bill.longman@gmail.com> wrote:

On 08/24/2010 08:36 PM, Kevin O'Gorman wrote:

> In order to make progress on this thing, it's useful to be able to

> control the display manager. *My problem has been that going to /etc/init.d

> and commanding "./xdm stop" seems to work, but has no effect on KDE.

> Manually killing kde (ps -ef | grep kde, etc) just starts another one.

> I finally figured out that I have to find the 'kdm' process and kill

> that, then a logoff or Ctl_Alt_BS actually gets rid of X, so I can do

> things like

> "X -configure" and so on.



You ~should~ be able to log onto a console vty by using Ctrl-Alt-Fn

(where n=1-6). You can then log on from there and commence all manner of

Gentacular shelly goodness.



There's really no need to kill the display manager ever. In fact, you

can have more than one running at a time.



> Oddly, "./xdm start" worked fine, and was responsible for kdm being

> started. * But isn't it odd that the display "manager" has such weak

> control on its "subordinate"? *Big PITA for me.



Yeah, that's just a semantic problem, really. The generic term is "xdm"

but depending upon your setup, you can plug in any display manager.

Sorry, but that has several bits of misinformation.

There are 2 or three activities that the system refuses to perform while the display is

active.* They require X to be shut down, and you must therefore use one of the non-X
console ptys.

"xdm" is not a generic term, or at least I didn't mean it that way. It's the package x11-apps/xdm.


Look it up.

--
Kevin O'Gorman, PhD
 
Old 08-25-2010, 07:37 PM
"Kevin O'Gorman"
 
Default Feckless xdm not much of a manager

On Wed, Aug 25, 2010 at 7:28 AM, Mick <michaelkintzios@gmail.com> wrote:

On 25 August 2010 15:22, Bill Longman <bill.longman@gmail.com> wrote:

> On 08/24/2010 08:36 PM, Kevin O'Gorman wrote:

>> In order to make progress on this thing, it's useful to be able to

>> control the display manager. *My problem has been that going to /etc/init.d

>> and commanding "./xdm stop" seems to work, but has no effect on KDE.

>> Manually killing kde (ps -ef | grep kde, etc) just starts another one.

>> I finally figured out that I have to find the 'kdm' process and kill

>> that, then a logoff or Ctl_Alt_BS actually gets rid of X, so I can do

>> things like

>> "X -configure" and so on.

>

[snip]
*
Running /etc/init.d/xdm stop should kill kdm too. *If it respawns,

then run /etc/init.d/xdm zap.

--

Regards,

Mick




zap does nothing about respawning.* It is used when a daemon has somehow died,
but is still marked as running.* In such a case, you cannot start it again without zapping
that marking so that it is recorded as being stopped.


I had more or less the opposite case -- a running daemon that was marked as stopped.
Not exactly, because it was xdm marked as stopped, and kdm that was running.

This problem is repeatable on my system, so I probably borked it somehow.

--
Kevin O'Gorman, PhD
 
Old 08-25-2010, 07:44 PM
Alex Schuster
 
Default Feckless xdm not much of a manager

Kevin O'Gorman writes:

> This problem is repeatable on my system, so I probably borked it
> somehow.

I know this effect, this happens from time to time. At the moment it is
working fine, but I got used to killall kdm when the init script did not
work. It did not bother me too much, so I did not file a bug yet.

Wonko
 
Old 08-25-2010, 08:40 PM
Robert Bridge
 
Default Feckless xdm not much of a manager

On Wed, Aug 25, 2010 at 8:33 PM, Kevin O'Gorman <kogorman@gmail.com> wrote:
> Sorry, but that has several bits of misinformation.
>
> "xdm" is not a generic term, or at least I didn't mean it that way. It's the
> package x11-apps/xdm.

Gentoo uses the term xdm in two ways, one is for the xdm display
manager, provided by that package. The other is for the init scripts
used to launch a display manager. The init script launches the display
manager specified in the config files, kdm being the common one
choosen for KDE.

You are complaining about kdm not shutting down, this is nothing at
all to do with x11-apps/xdm, which is an entirely separate package. If
you have both running, than, again, kdms inability to behave is NOT a
problem of x11-apps/xdm, though, arguably, it could be said to be a
problem of openrc.

RobbieAB
 
Old 08-25-2010, 11:00 PM
Stroller
 
Default Feckless xdm not much of a manager

On 25 Aug 2010, at 04:36, Kevin O'Gorman wrote:

... My problem has been that going to /etc/init.d
and commanding "./xdm stop" seems to work, but has no effect on
KDE. Manually killing kde (ps -ef | grep kde, etc) just starts
another one. I finally figured out that I have to find the 'kdm'
process and kill that, then a logoff or Ctl_Alt_BS actually gets rid
of X, so I can do things like

"X -configure" and so on.


If you run `/etc/init.d/xdm stop` and then log out of KDE using the
logoff button in the Start Menu, what happens, please? Does xdm return?


Stroller.
 

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