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Old 07-09-2010, 01:50 AM
Allan Gottlieb
 
Default viewing .m4v files with totem

How should I view .m4v files with totem.
Is there a gst-plugin or a use flag for gst-plugins-meta?

I have used the following, which "works", but the video quality is bad
ffmpeg -i file.m4v file.avi
totem file.avi

thanks,
allan
 
Old 07-11-2010, 05:05 PM
walt
 
Default viewing .m4v files with totem

On 07/08/2010 06:50 PM, Allan Gottlieb wrote:
> How should I view .m4v files with totem.
> Is there a gst-plugin or a use flag for gst-plugins-meta?
>
> I have used the following, which "works", but the video quality is bad
> ffmpeg -i file.m4v file.avi
> totem file.avi

Multimedia file types still confuse me. I believe the codecs for the
packaged audio and video are the important thing when converting formats.
If the video and audio streams are copied rather than re-encoded, the
quality should be maintained regardless of the particular packaging.

What does "file yourfile.m4v" say? For example:

#file myfile.mpg
myfile.mpg: RIFF (little-endian) data, AVI, 512 x 384, 25.00 fps, video:
Microsoft MPEG-4 v3, audio: MPEG-1 Layer 3 (mono, 24000 Hz)

Totem displays the sample file I used above, so I must have the right
codecs installed, but I can't tell you which package they came from.

What does totem say when you play your m4v file?
 
Old 07-12-2010, 02:42 AM
Allan Gottlieb
 
Default viewing .m4v files with totem

walt <w41ter@gmail.com> writes:

> On 07/08/2010 06:50 PM, Allan Gottlieb wrote:
>> How should I view .m4v files with totem.
>> Is there a gst-plugin or a use flag for gst-plugins-meta?
>>
>> I have used the following, which "works", but the video quality is bad
>> ffmpeg -i file.m4v file.avi
>> totem file.avi
>
> Multimedia file types still confuse me. I believe the codecs for the
> packaged audio and video are the important thing when converting formats.
> If the video and audio streams are copied rather than re-encoded, the
> quality should be maintained regardless of the particular packaging.
>
> What does "file yourfile.m4v" say? For example:
>
> #file myfile.mpg
> myfile.mpg: RIFF (little-endian) data, AVI, 512 x 384, 25.00 fps, video:
> Microsoft MPEG-4 v3, audio: MPEG-1 Layer 3 (mono, 24000 Hz)

ajglap video # file Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.*
Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.avi: RIFF (little-endian) data, AVI, 320 x 240, ~30 fps, video: FFMpeg MPEG-4, audio: MPEG-1 Layer 1 or 2 (stereo, 44100 Hz)
Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.m4v: ISO Media, MPEG v4 system, iTunes AVC-LC
ajglap video #

> Totem displays the sample file I used above, so I must have the right
> codecs installed, but I can't tell you which package they came from.
>
> What does totem say when you play your m4v file?

gottlieb@ajglap /a/video $ totem Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.m4v
bt_audio_service_open: connect() failed: Connection refused (111)
gottlieb@ajglap /a/video $

Just as an experiment I enable every use flag in gst-plugins-meta.
This had no effect; the result was the same msg.

thanks for your help,
allan
 
Old 07-13-2010, 01:09 AM
walt
 
Default viewing .m4v files with totem

On 07/11/2010 07:42 PM, Allan Gottlieb wrote:

> ajglap video # file Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.*
> Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.avi: RIFF (little-endian) data, AVI, 320 x 240, ~30 fps, video: FFMpeg MPEG-4, audio: MPEG-1 Layer 1 or 2 (stereo, 44100 Hz)

Okay, the above is the avi file you made by using ffmpeg to conver the m4v
file below, right?

> Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.m4v: ISO Media, MPEG v4 system, iTunes AVC-LC

I had no idea what the ISO Media format is, so I read about it here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_base_media_file_format

Now I know almost as much as I knew before

This excerpt seems significant to me, however: "ISO base media file format
is directly based on Apple’s QuickTime container format". That makes sense
because iTunes is mentioned in the same breath as ISO Media.

My theory is that Steve Jobs is now riding high and wants to displace M$
as the 800-pound-standards-dictating gorilla.

Apple has always been smarter than M$, so I'd rather see Apple dictating
standards, but dictators are still dictators, and Jobs is as ferociously
closed-shop as Gates and Ballmer ever were. (When is google going to
publish an extensible open-source multimedia format? Android almost forces
them to do it, IMHO.)

> What does totem say when you play your m4v file?
>
> gottlieb@ajglap /a/video $ totem Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.m4v
> bt_audio_service_open: connect() failed: Connection refused (111)

I haven't a clue what that means, unless maybe any multimedia file
from iTunes wants to authenticate with an iTunes server before the
file can be played? I have no idea.

Anyone else?
 
Old 07-13-2010, 02:23 AM
Allan Gottlieb
 
Default viewing .m4v files with totem

walt <w41ter@gmail.com> writes:

> On 07/11/2010 07:42 PM, Allan Gottlieb wrote:
>
>> ajglap video # file Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.*
>> Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.avi: RIFF (little-endian) data, AVI, 320 x 240, ~30 fps, video: FFMpeg MPEG-4, audio: MPEG-1 Layer 1 or 2 (stereo, 44100 Hz)
>
> Okay, the above is the avi file you made by using ffmpeg to conver the m4v
> file below, right?

Correct.

>> Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.m4v: ISO Media, MPEG v4 system, iTunes AVC-LC
>
> I had no idea what the ISO Media format is, so I read about it here:
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_base_media_file_format
>
> Now I know almost as much as I knew before
>
> This excerpt seems significant to me, however: "ISO base media file format
> is directly based on Apple’s QuickTime container format". That makes sense
> because iTunes is mentioned in the same breath as ISO Media.
>
> My theory is that Steve Jobs is now riding high and wants to displace M$
> as the 800-pound-standards-dictating gorilla.
>
> Apple has always been smarter than M$, so I'd rather see Apple dictating
> standards, but dictators are still dictators, and Jobs is as ferociously
> closed-shop as Gates and Ballmer ever were. (When is google going to
> publish an extensible open-source multimedia format? Android almost forces
> them to do it, IMHO.)
>
>> What does totem say when you play your m4v file?
>>
>> gottlieb@ajglap /a/video $ totem Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.m4v
>> bt_audio_service_open: connect() failed: Connection refused (111)
>
> I haven't a clue what that means, unless maybe any multimedia file
> from iTunes wants to authenticate with an iTunes server before the
> file can be played? I have no idea.
>
> Anyone else?

This file is a freebee lecture from the teaching company (I buy many of
their lectures, but only the audio versions, which are straight mp3).

I think the msg is

1. You can play some m4v's.
2. This particular m4v involves iTunes (I assume other m4v's, in
particular the ones you can watch with totem) do not involve iTunes.

totem can't play it but ffmpeg can convert it (poorly).

Perhaps when the heat spell is over and I can justify putting on the AC
in my NYU office, I will re-power-on the desktop there, and put the files on
the internet. Then I could send a bug to bugs.gentoo.org.

thanks again for your help.
allan
 
Old 07-13-2010, 06:46 PM
Stroller
 
Default viewing .m4v files with totem

On 9 Jul 2010, at 02:50, Allan Gottlieb wrote:


How should I view .m4v files with totem.
Is there a gst-plugin or a use flag for gst-plugins-meta?

I have used the following, which "works", but the video quality is bad
ffmpeg -i file.m4v file.avi
totem file.avi


Hi there,

I was been reluctant to reply earlier, because I'm not a real expert
on the subject, but .m4v is a *container format*, as is .mp4
and .avi. .avi is actually a poorer one.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.m4v

I believe any of these containers can contain a variety of video /
audio *codecs*. There are still loads of files floating around which
use old Windows-centric codecs, but h264 is becoming the most common
video codec. A container might contain the audio as MP3, AAC or
something else.


So it's not clear from just saying "convert from one file format to
another" whether you converted the audio &/or video from one codec to
another (known as "transcoding") or whether you just took the existing
audio &/or video and simply put it in a different container (known as
remuxing, I believe). A few minutes of video in an undemanding codec
might be transcoded to shitty quality in a matter of minutes, nearly
as quickly as remuxing a large video. The latter would depending on
the speed of your disk / filesystem, but remuxing is a little slower
than copying the whole multi-gigabyte file - that takes a couple of
minutes around here. To transcode a full DVD to highest quality h264
might take 18 or 24 hours (on a Pentium 4).


As far as containers as concerned, .mp4 is a pretty good one. I
_think_ that .m4v is very similar, but I can't swear to it. .avi is
rubbish, but it's the default interim container for some converters -
I think that mplayer / mencoder, for instance can produce technically
invalid .avi files that won't play on some systems, but it does that
because it assumes you know what you're doing and will remux them
to .mp4 afterwards (using mp4box, for instance). .mkv is a container
that is becoming very popular because it supports modern codes like
h264/AAC but allows you to store multiple tracks within the container
- Dolby stereo audio, 5.1 audio and a director's commentary, for
instance, each of which may be in whatever codec you like. There is a
shortcoming of of .mkv which applies to older systems with slower
disks, but probably shouldn't apply here; if you can, use .mkv.


I believe you should try using this command on the file:

mplayer -vo null -ao null -identify -endpos 1 myfile.m4v

This should tell you more about the codecs in which the content are
encoded. Feel free to post the output here.


You didn't show us what the output (or verbose output) of your ffmpeg
command was, so we don't know if the original .m4v had shitty quality,
or if you transcoded it.


It's also worth checking the USE flags for all your video-playing
applications - I enable at least the aac, h264 and mp3 USE flags on
any new system, but I think Gentoo ships with them disabled by default
because of licensing / patent / Freedom issues in some major
jurisdictions.


HTH,

Stroller.
 
Old 07-13-2010, 08:20 PM
Allan Gottlieb
 
Default viewing .m4v files with totem

Stroller <stroller@stellar.eclipse.co.uk> writes:

> On 9 Jul 2010, at 02:50, Allan Gottlieb wrote:
>
>> How should I view .m4v files with totem.
>> Is there a gst-plugin or a use flag for gst-plugins-meta?
>>
>> I have used the following, which "works", but the video quality is bad
>> ffmpeg -i file.m4v file.avi
>> totem file.avi
>
> Hi there,

First and foremost, thank you.
A lucid and informative explanation.

> I was been reluctant to reply earlier, because I'm not a real expert
> on the subject, but .m4v is a *container format*, as is .mp4 and
> .avi. .avi is actually a poorer one.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.m4v
>
> I believe any of these containers can contain a variety of video /
> audio *codecs*. There are still loads of files floating around which
> use old Windows-centric codecs, but h264 is becoming the most common
> video codec. A container might contain the audio as MP3, AAC or
> something else.
>
> So it's not clear from just saying "convert from one file format to
> another" whether you converted the audio &/or video from one codec to
> another (known as "transcoding") or whether you just took the existing
> audio &/or video and simply put it in a different container (known as
> remuxing, I believe). A few minutes of video in an undemanding codec
> might be transcoded to shitty quality in a matter of minutes, nearly
> as quickly as remuxing a large video. The latter would depending on
> the speed of your disk / filesystem, but remuxing is a little slower
> than copying the whole multi-gigabyte file - that takes a couple of
> minutes around here. To transcode a full DVD to highest quality h264
> might take 18 or 24 hours (on a Pentium 4).
>
> As far as containers as concerned, .mp4 is a pretty good one. I
> _think_ that .m4v is very similar, but I can't swear to it. .avi is
> rubbish, but it's the default interim container for some converters -
> I think that mplayer / mencoder, for instance can produce technically
> invalid .avi files that won't play on some systems, but it does that
> because it assumes you know what you're doing and will remux them to
> .mp4 afterwards (using mp4box, for instance). .mkv is a container
> that is becoming very popular because it supports modern codes like
> h264/AAC but allows you to store multiple tracks within the container
> - Dolby stereo audio, 5.1 audio and a director's commentary, for
> instance, each of which may be in whatever codec you like. There is a
> shortcoming of of .mkv which applies to older systems with slower
> disks, but probably shouldn't apply here; if you can, use .mkv.
>
> I believe you should try using this command on the file:
>
> mplayer -vo null -ao null -identify -endpos 1 myfile.m4v
>
> This should tell you more about the codecs in which the content are
> encoded. Feel free to post the output here.

Here it is.

ajglap gottlieb # mplayer -vo null -ao null -identify -endpos 1 /a/video/Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.m4v
Creating config file: /root/.mplayer/config
MPlayer SVN-r30554-4.4.4 (C) 2000-2010 MPlayer Team

Playing /a/video/Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.m4v.
libavformat file format detected.
ID_VIDEO_ID=0
[lavf] stream 0: video (h264), -vid 0
ID_AUDIO_ID=0
ID_AID_0_LANG=eng
[lavf] stream 1: audio (aac), -aid 0, -alang eng
VIDEO: [H264] 320x240 24bpp 29.970 fps 513.8 kbps (62.7 kbyte/s)
Clip info:
major_brand: M4V
ID_CLIP_INFO_NAME0=major_brand
ID_CLIP_INFO_VALUE0=M4V
minor_version: 1
ID_CLIP_INFO_NAME1=minor_version
ID_CLIP_INFO_VALUE1=1
compatible_brands: M4V M4A mp42isom
ID_CLIP_INFO_NAME2=compatible_brands
ID_CLIP_INFO_VALUE2=M4V M4A mp42isom
ID_CLIP_INFO_N=3
ID_FILENAME=/a/video/Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.m4v
ID_DEMUXER=lavfpref
ID_VIDEO_FORMAT=H264
ID_VIDEO_BITRATE=513768
ID_VIDEO_WIDTH=320
ID_VIDEO_HEIGHT=240
ID_VIDEO_FPS=29.970
ID_VIDEO_ASPECT=0.0000
ID_AUDIO_FORMAT=MP4A
ID_AUDIO_BITRATE=118856
ID_AUDIO_RATE=44100
ID_AUDIO_NCH=2
ID_START_TIME=0.00
ID_LENGTH=1994.25
ID_SEEKABLE=1
ID_CHAPTERS=0
================================================== ========================
Opening video decoder: [ffmpeg] FFmpeg's libavcodec codec family
Selected video codec: [ffh264] vfm: ffmpeg (FFmpeg H.264)
================================================== ========================
ID_VIDEO_CODEC=ffh264
================================================== ========================
Opening audio decoder: [faad] AAC (MPEG2/4 Advanced Audio Coding)
AUDIO: 44100 Hz, 2 ch, s16le, 118.9 kbit/8.42% (ratio: 14857->176400)
ID_AUDIO_BITRATE=118856
ID_AUDIO_RATE=44100
ID_AUDIO_NCH=2
Selected audio codec: [faad] afm: faad (FAAD AAC (MPEG-2/MPEG-4 Audio))
================================================== ========================
AO: [null] 44100Hz 2ch s16le (2 bytes per sample)
ID_AUDIO_CODEC=faad
Starting playback...
Movie-Aspect is undefined - no prescaling applied.
VO: [null] 320x240 => 320x240 Planar YV12
A: 1.0 V: 1.0 A-V: 0.001 ct: 0.022 0/ 0 2% 0% 0.9% 0 0

Exiting... (End of file)
ID_EXIT=EOF
ajglap gottlieb #

> You didn't show us what the output (or verbose output) of your ffmpeg
> command was, so we don't know if the original .m4v had shitty quality,
> or if you transcoded it.

Here it is with verbose output

ajglap video # ffmpeg -loglevel verbose -i Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.m4v Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.avi
FFmpeg version 0.6, Copyright (c) 2000-2010 the FFmpeg developers
built on Jun 21 2010 18:01:44 with gcc 4.4.4
configuration: --prefix=/usr --libdir=/usr/lib64 --shlibdir=/usr/lib64 --mandir=/usr/share/man --enable-static --enable-shared --cc=x86_64-pc-linux-gnu-gcc --disable-debug --disable-network --enable-libmp3lame --enable-libvorbis --enable-libx264 --enable-libxvid --disable-indev=v4l --disable-indev=v4l2 --disable-indev=oss --disable-indev=jack --disable-outdev=oss --enable-x11grab --disable-vdpau --disable-vdpau --disable-vaapi --disable-altivec --cpu=host --enable-gpl --enable-version3 --enable-postproc --enable-avfilter --enable-avfilter-lavf --disable-stripping --enable-hardcoded-tables --disable-doc
libavutil 50.15. 1 / 50.15. 1
libavcodec 52.72. 2 / 52.72. 2
libavformat 52.64. 2 / 52.64. 2
libavdevice 52. 2. 0 / 52. 2. 0
libavfilter 1.19. 0 / 1.19. 0
libswscale 0.11. 0 / 0.11. 0
libpostproc 51. 2. 0 / 51. 2. 0

Seems stream 0 codec frame rate differs from container frame rate: 5994.00 (5994/1) -> 29.97 (2997/100)
Input #0, mov,mp4,m4a,3gp,3g2,mj2, from 'Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.m4v':
Metadata:
major_brand : M4V
minor_version : 1
compatible_brands: M4V M4A mp42isom
Duration: 00:33:14.24, start: 0.000000, bitrate: 636 kb/s
Stream #0.0(eng): Video: h264, yuv420p, 320x240, 513 kb/s, 29.97 fps, 29.97 tbr, 2997 tbn, 5994 tbc
Stream #0.1(eng): Audio: aac, 44100 Hz, stereo, s16, 118 kb/s
Output #0, avi, to 'Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.avi':
Metadata:
ISFT : Lavf52.64.2
Stream #0.0(eng): Video: mpeg4, yuv420p, 320x240, q=2-31, 200 kb/s, 29.97 tbn, 29.97 tbc
Stream #0.1(eng): Audio: mp2, 44100 Hz, stereo, s16, 64 kb/s
Stream mapping:
Stream #0.0 -> #0.0
Stream #0.1 -> #0.1
Press [q] to stop encoding
frame=59767 fps=470 q=3.6 Lsize= 67863kB time=1994.23 bitrate= 278.8kbits/s
video:48981kB audio:15580kB global headers:0kB muxing overhead 5.113521%
ajglap video #

> It's also worth checking the USE flags for all your video-playing
> applications - I enable at least the aac, h264 and mp3 USE flags on
> any new system, but I think Gentoo ships with them disabled by default
> because of licensing / patent / Freedom issues in some major
> jurisdictions.

I have the desktop profile so acc and mp3 are enabled by default.
I believe you mean the x264 USE flag, which is also enabled by default
in the desktop profile

ajglap gottlieb # grep h264 /usr/portage/profiles/use.desc
x264 - Enable h264 encoding using x264
ajglap gottlieb #

> HTH,

It does indeed.

I didn't have mplayer installed previously. I just tried mplayer on
both the .m4v and .avi files. Unlike totem it was able to play the m4v.
Like totem it played the .avi and like totem the quality was poor,
definitely worse than mplayer viewing the .m4v. The .avi used in both
cases was the one produced by the mplayer command you gave above.

So

1. mplayer can play the .m4v, which totem can't.

2. I guess that means I need some option/plugin/use-flag for totem.
Anyone have a hint?

3. The conversion from .m4v to .avi costs quality.
ffmpeg noted differing frame rates. Is that relevant?
Since the conversion of a 30 minute movie took
only a very few minutes, your estimates above suggest that it was
just remux-ed and not transcoded, at least not using a demanding
codec.

thanks again,
allan
 
Old 07-14-2010, 05:31 PM
Stroller
 
Default viewing .m4v files with totem

Hi Allan,

Glad to have been some help. I can't answer any of your other
questions, so it might be worth checking out the Totelm mailing list.
The mplayer developers have a public ftp upload you can use to send
them problematic files, maybe Totem devs have the same?


Comments continue below...


On 13 Jul 2010, at 21:20, Allan Gottlieb wrote:

...

You didn't show us what the output (or verbose output) of your ffmpeg
command was, so we don't know if the original .m4v had shitty
quality,

or if you transcoded it.


Here it is with verbose output

ajglap video # ffmpeg -loglevel verbose -i Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.m4v
Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.avi

FFmpeg version 0.6, Copyright (c) 2000-2010 the FFmpeg developers
built on Jun 21 2010 18:01:44 with gcc 4.4.4
configuration: --prefix=/usr --libdir=/usr/lib64 --shlibdir=/usr/
lib64 --mandir=/usr/share/man --enable-static --enable-shared --
cc=x86_64-pc-linux-gnu-gcc --disable-debug --disable-network --
enable-libmp3lame --enable-libvorbis --enable-libx264 --enable-
libxvid --disable-indev=v4l --disable-indev=v4l2 --disable-indev=oss
--disable-indev=jack --disable-outdev=oss --enable-x11grab --disable-
vdpau --disable-vdpau --disable-vaapi --disable-altivec --cpu=host --
enable-gpl --enable-version3 --enable-postproc --enable-avfilter --
enable-avfilter-lavf --disable-stripping --enable-hardcoded-tables --
disable-doc

libavutil 50.15. 1 / 50.15. 1
libavcodec 52.72. 2 / 52.72. 2
libavformat 52.64. 2 / 52.64. 2
libavdevice 52. 2. 0 / 52. 2. 0
libavfilter 1.19. 0 / 1.19. 0
libswscale 0.11. 0 / 0.11. 0
libpostproc 51. 2. 0 / 51. 2. 0

Seems stream 0 codec frame rate differs from container frame rate:
5994.00 (5994/1) -> 29.97 (2997/100)

Input #0, mov,mp4,m4a,3gp,3g2,mj2, from 'Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.m4v':
Metadata:
major_brand : M4V
minor_version : 1
compatible_brands: M4V M4A mp42isom
Duration: 00:33:14.24, start: 0.000000, bitrate: 636 kb/s
Stream #0.0(eng): Video: h264, yuv420p, 320x240, 513 kb/s, 29.97
fps, 29.97 tbr, 2997 tbn, 5994 tbc

Stream #0.1(eng): Audio: aac, 44100 Hz, stereo, s16, 118 kb/s
Output #0, avi, to 'Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.avi':
Metadata:
ISFT : Lavf52.64.2
Stream #0.0(eng): Video: mpeg4, yuv420p, 320x240, q=2-31, 200 kb/
s, 29.97 tbn, 29.97 tbc

Stream #0.1(eng): Audio: mp2, 44100 Hz, stereo, s16, 64 kb/s
Stream mapping:
Stream #0.0 -> #0.0
Stream #0.1 -> #0.1
Press [q] to stop encoding
frame=59767 fps=470 q=3.6 Lsize= 67863kB time=1994.23 bitrate=
278.8kbits/s
video:48981kB audio:15580kB global headers:0kB muxing overhead
5.113521%

ajglap video #

...
3. The conversion from .m4v to .avi costs quality.
ffmpeg noted differing frame rates. Is that relevant?
Since the conversion of a 30 minute movie took
only a very few minutes, your estimates above suggest that it was
just remux-ed and not transcoded, at least not using a demanding
codec.


A remux should never affect quality - you're taking the same video
stream and putting it in another container. The video itself is
unchanged.


My time estimates were based my use of older Pentium 4 machines - I
can only guess you have a Core 2 Duo or something? Also, I don't know
how large this file is? 33 minutes? My "18 - 24 hours" estimate was
based on a 2 - 3 hour DVD, but also with 2- or 3-pass encoding (which
you're obviously not performing) and high settings generally. A DVD
would have higher resolution than your 320x240 clip. Nevertheless, I'm
a little surprised at how quick your machine is - all my computers are
so old.


The way I read the output above is that ffmpeg determines the input
file to be 513 kb/s video, and its defaulting to 200 kb/s output - so
that *is* a transcode. mplayer also states the original to be 513 kb/
s, I notice. In fact you would be able to determine the bitrate of
the .avi file by running the `mplayer -identify` command on it - this
should confirm that your .avi file is about 200 kb/s, I imagine. That
confirms transcoding - if you're remuxing the video then the bitrate
will be lower.


The bitrate is a measure of how much space is consumed on disk to
store one second of video. So, using the same codec and source
material, a lower bitrate will tend to be lower quality, as less space
is consumed storing the details. I think you will probably find
your .avi to be about 30% - 40% the size of your original .m4v - of
course it will be lower quality!


That you have determined the original video to be in h264/AAC is good,
I think. You might try downloading a TED talk, as I think they too use
these same common codecs. See if Totem plays that.

e.g.: http://www.ted.com/talks/download/video/9151/talk/899

Looking at the wikipedia link I sent you before, I think .m4v is just
the same as .mp4. I think that if Totem plays an .mp4 TED Talk but not
your file, then there's a problem with the encoding or format with
your video.


You might try remuxing your .m4v into .mkv, but I'm not sure what tool
you'd use. I _think_ you can remux into .avi using `mencoder -copy` -
I believe an .avi containing h264 and AAC breaks specification, but I
think most Linux players will tolerate it happily.


I can't immediately think of any other comments to make. Hopefully
this will give you some more directions to explore.


HTH,

Stroller.
 
Old 07-15-2010, 11:29 PM
walt
 
Default viewing .m4v files with totem

On 07/11/2010 07:42 PM, Allan Gottlieb wrote:

walt<w41ter@gmail.com> writes:



What does totem say when you play your m4v file?


gottlieb@ajglap /a/video $ totem Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.m4v
bt_audio_service_open: connect() failed: Connection refused (111)


Here's an interesting thread from ubuntu forums:

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1490237
 
Old 07-16-2010, 02:42 PM
Allan Gottlieb
 
Default viewing .m4v files with totem

walt <w41ter@gmail.com> writes:

> On 07/11/2010 07:42 PM, Allan Gottlieb wrote:
>> walt<w41ter@gmail.com> writes:
>
>>> What does totem say when you play your m4v file?
>>
>> gottlieb@ajglap /a/video $ totem Game_Theory_Lect_20_s.m4v
>> bt_audio_service_open: connect() failed: Connection refused (111)
>
> Here's an interesting thread from ubuntu forums:
>
> http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1490237

Interesting indeed.

The problem mentioned in that article concerns mplayer, which in my case
can play the .m4v. However, the comment that bluez causes problem
caused me to wonder why I had it installed and then I checked my USE
flags to see a large list including "bluetooth". I am cleaning up other
things now, but may decide to add -bluetooth to make.conf or more
radically change my profile (currently ...desktop/gnome).

thanks for the pointer.
allan
 

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