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Old 07-04-2010, 09:59 AM
Stroller
 
Default /usr/bin/time is in what package?

On 4 Jul 2010, at 09:22, meino.cramer@gmx.de wrote:

in what package can I find /usr/bin/time (not the shell's builtin) ?


sys-process/time


Or, in other more general words: How can I find a package which
contains a certain installable file?


qfile /usr/bin/time

Stroller.
 
Old 07-04-2010, 10:53 AM
William Kenworthy
 
Default /usr/bin/time is in what package?

On Sun, 2010-07-04 at 10:59 +0100, Stroller wrote:
> On 4 Jul 2010, at 09:22, meino.cramer@gmx.de wrote:
> > in what package can I find /usr/bin/time (not the shell's builtin) ?
>
> sys-process/time
>
> > Or, in other more general words: How can I find a package which
> > contains a certain installable file?
>
> qfile /usr/bin/time
>
> Stroller.
>
>

This only works for files already on your system which is ok if thats
what you want. If like in this case you are trying to locate a binary
thats not installed - how do you find what package its in?

For me its down to googling and seeing what other distros use and map
that back to a gentoo package as far as I can see.

BillK


--
William Kenworthy <billk@iinet.net.au>
Home in Perth!
 
Old 07-04-2010, 12:10 PM
pk
 
Default /usr/bin/time is in what package?

On 2010-07-04 11:57, Mick wrote:

> It's part of /bin/busybox I think so running qfile time will not show it up
> and which time won't get you closer either.

I just got curious when the OP posted this so I tried to do a 'which
time' and equery b time but no go... But still I have the 'time' command
available, so I thought it was a bash builtin command, but it isn't
(acc. to the manual)... It's not an alias either. Busybox does contain
the 'time' command but it doesn't seem like there's a hard link called
'time' anywhere in my path, but still I can run 'time'... I'm confused!
Anyone have a good explanation?

Best regards

Peter K
 
Old 07-04-2010, 12:13 PM
Etaoin Shrdlu
 
Default /usr/bin/time is in what package?

On Sun, 04 Jul 2010 14:10:13 +0200
pk <peterk2@coolmail.se> wrote:

> On 2010-07-04 11:57, Mick wrote:
>
> > It's part of /bin/busybox I think so running qfile time will not
> > show it up and which time won't get you closer either.
>
> I just got curious when the OP posted this so I tried to do a 'which
> time' and equery b time but no go... But still I have the 'time'
> command available, so I thought it was a bash builtin command, but it
> isn't (acc. to the manual)... It's not an alias either. Busybox does
> contain the 'time' command but it doesn't seem like there's a hard
> link called 'time' anywhere in my path, but still I can run 'time'...
> I'm confused! Anyone have a good explanation?

$ type -a time
time is a shell keyword
 
Old 07-04-2010, 03:27 PM
pk
 
Default /usr/bin/time is in what package?

On 2010-07-04 14:13, Etaoin Shrdlu wrote:

> $ type -a time
> time is a shell keyword

And the world makes sense again... ;-)

Thanks!

Best regards

Peter K
 

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