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Old 05-12-2010, 10:56 PM
Willie Wong
 
Default can't create file but disk isn't full

On Thu, May 13, 2010 at 12:25:08AM +0200, Alex Schuster wrote:
> > The 5% is historical from days when disks are much smaller. If you
> > have a sensible partition scheme you only really need to reserve the
> > blocks on the $ROOT filesystem. If the partition in question (IIRC) is
> > only for /home, then you can just turn off the reserved blocks all
> > together.
>
> Isn't another purpose of those 5% the reduction of fragmentation that
> occurs more when there is few free space left? Although I also reduce ift
> on very large partitions. But I never set it to exactly zero.

Perhaps? I don't know. My ext3 partitions with 0% are all for large
files (videos and music) that are more or less static, so I can't say
anything about fragmentation on them. My other partitions are all
reiser, so can't say anything about fragmentation on them either

W
--
Willie W. Wong wwong@math.princeton.edu
Data aequatione quotcunque fluentes quantitae involvente fluxiones invenire
et vice versa ~~~ I. Newton
 
Old 05-12-2010, 11:37 PM
Nikos Chantziaras
 
Default can't create file but disk isn't full

On 05/13/2010 01:56 AM, Willie Wong wrote:

On Thu, May 13, 2010 at 12:25:08AM +0200, Alex Schuster wrote:

The 5% is historical from days when disks are much smaller. If you
have a sensible partition scheme you only really need to reserve the
blocks on the $ROOT filesystem. If the partition in question (IIRC) is
only for /home, then you can just turn off the reserved blocks all
together.


Isn't another purpose of those 5% the reduction of fragmentation that
occurs more when there is few free space left? Although I also reduce ift
on very large partitions. But I never set it to exactly zero.


Perhaps? I don't know. My ext3 partitions with 0% are all for large
files (videos and music) that are more or less static, so I can't say
anything about fragmentation on them. My other partitions are all
reiser, so can't say anything about fragmentation on them either


The tune2fs man page mentions that fragmentation is also a reason:

-m reserved-blocks-percentage
Set the percentage of the filesystem which may only be allocated
by privileged processes. Reserving some number of filesystem
blocks for use by privileged processes is done to avoid
filesystem fragmentation, and to allow system daemons, such as
syslogd(8), to continue to function correctly after non-
privileged processes are prevented from writing to the
filesystem. Normally, the default percentage of reserved blocks
is 5%.
 

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