FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > Gentoo > Gentoo User

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 02-04-2009, 12:38 PM
Stroller
 
Default /etc/init.d/: ntpd or ntp-client?

Hi there,

I just logged into one of my machines that has recently been powered
down for a few days - not a terribly common occurrence with my servers
- to find a date of January 30th showing.


I used to run ntp-client, but AIUI adding this to the default runlevel
only sets the clock once at boot up. Of course the problem with that
is that the computer's clock can become inaccurate if the spring
tension is weak, as is obviously the case in my older PCs.


So a while back I changed /etc/runlevels/default so that ntpd is
started instead.


I understood that ntpd was not only a server for my LAN (a facility I
don't use) but that it would also periodically check the time with
upstream servers & keep the machine's clock in constant sync.


So when I found the clock to be a week out of date I checked that ntpd
appeared to be running (it was) and restarted it. The date remained
the same. Stopping ntpd & starting ntp-client corrected the date
immediately.


Before I do any investigation, can someone tell me if my understanding
so far is correct? Is ntpd supposed to keep the machine's clock in
constant sync, or is it only (say) a server to offer the date to
clients? (depending upon the clock being set correctly by other means)
I thought I had configured ntpd with upstream servers separately from
ntp-client.


Stroller.
 
Old 02-04-2009, 12:40 PM
Justin
 
Default /etc/init.d/: ntpd or ntp-client?

Stroller schrieb:
> Hi there,
>
> I just logged into one of my machines that has recently been powered
> down for a few days - not a terribly common occurrence with my servers -
> to find a date of January 30th showing.
>
> I used to run ntp-client, but AIUI adding this to the default runlevel
> only sets the clock once at boot up. Of course the problem with that is
> that the computer's clock can become inaccurate if the spring tension is
> weak, as is obviously the case in my older PCs.
>
> So a while back I changed /etc/runlevels/default so that ntpd is started
> instead.
>
> I understood that ntpd was not only a server for my LAN (a facility I
> don't use) but that it would also periodically check the time with
> upstream servers & keep the machine's clock in constant sync.
>
> So when I found the clock to be a week out of date I checked that ntpd
> appeared to be running (it was) and restarted it. The date remained the
> same. Stopping ntpd & starting ntp-client corrected the date immediately.
>
> Before I do any investigation, can someone tell me if my understanding
> so far is correct? Is ntpd supposed to keep the machine's clock in
> constant sync, or is it only (say) a server to offer the date to
> clients? (depending upon the clock being set correctly by other means) I
> thought I had configured ntpd with upstream servers separately from
> ntp-client.
>
> Stroller.
>

pkg_postinst() {
ewarn "You can find an example /etc/ntp.conf in /usr/share/ntp/"
ewarn "Review /etc/ntp.conf to setup server info."
ewarn "Review /etc/conf.d/ntpd to setup init.d info."
echo
elog "The way ntp sets and maintains your system time has changed."
elog "Now you can use /etc/init.d/ntp-client to set your time at"
elog "boot while you can use /etc/init.d/ntpd to maintain your time"
elog "while your machine runs"
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 07:54 AM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org