FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > Gentoo > Gentoo User

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 02-03-2009, 04:43 PM
Momesso Andrea
 
Default Different servers behind the same router

I have a home server running gentoo for personal use (irc, home
entertainment, file server etc.).

It is reachable from the internet using a dyamic dns service
(dyndns.org).

I also have another machine (running gentoo too) that I use as a web
server. This machine uses dyndns.org, with a different name.

Both machines connect to my modem/router via pppoe so they get 2
different IPs.

This modem can also be configured to be used as a router so it connects
directly to the internet and shares the same IP between the clients.

What happens if I decide to switch to the "router" configuration? If I
have a single IP for all the machines in the LAN, when someone from the
outside will try to connect to homeserver.foo or to webserver.bar, will
they be routed to the correct machine?

Are there other setups I should look into?

=======
TopperH
=======
 
Old 02-03-2009, 04:52 PM
Stroller
 
Default Different servers behind the same router

On 3 Feb 2009, at 17:43, Momesso Andrea wrote:

...
What happens if I decide to switch to the "router" configuration? If I
have a single IP for all the machines in the LAN, when someone from
the
outside will try to connect to homeserver.foo or to webserver.bar,
will

they be routed to the correct machine?


No, they will all reach the router's IP address. It will have an
option for "port forwarding" so that you can forward port 80 to the
webserver and ports 25 & 110 to the mail server. If you have two
webservers behind the router then you need to use one to proxy forward
to the other.


"NAT" is another Google keyword.

Stroller.
 
Old 02-03-2009, 05:35 PM
Momesso Andrea
 
Default Different servers behind the same router

On Tue, Feb 03, 2009 at 05:52:13PM +0000, Stroller wrote:
>
> On 3 Feb 2009, at 17:43, Momesso Andrea wrote:
>> ...
>> What happens if I decide to switch to the "router" configuration? If I
>> have a single IP for all the machines in the LAN, when someone from the
>> outside will try to connect to homeserver.foo or to webserver.bar, will
>> they be routed to the correct machine?
>
> No, they will all reach the router's IP address. It will have an option for
> "port forwarding" so that you can forward port 80 to the webserver and
> ports 25 & 110 to the mail server. If you have two webservers behind the
> router then you need to use one to proxy forward to the other.
>
> "NAT" is another Google keyword.
>
> Stroller.

Is it correct to say that the configuration I alredy have (pppoe and different IPs) is the best choice?

=======
TopperH
=======
 
Old 02-03-2009, 05:47 PM
Saphirus Sage
 
Default Different servers behind the same router

On Feb 3, 2009, at 12:43 PM, Momesso Andrea <momesso.andrea@gmail.com>
wrote:



I have a home server running gentoo for personal use (irc, home
entertainment, file server etc.).

It is reachable from the internet using a dyamic dns service
(dyndns.org).

I also have another machine (running gentoo too) that I use as a web
server. This machine uses dyndns.org, with a different name.

Both machines connect to my modem/router via pppoe so they get 2
different IPs.

This modem can also be configured to be used as a router so it
connects

directly to the internet and shares the same IP between the clients.

What happens if I decide to switch to the "router" configuration? If I
have a single IP for all the machines in the LAN, when someone from
the
outside will try to connect to homeserver.foo or to webserver.bar,
will

they be routed to the correct machine?

Are there other setups I should look into?

=======
TopperH
=======
Configure your router for static IP assignment on the LAN and look at
your router's manual for information about "port forwarding." Simply
forward the required port from the WAN to the associated LAN IP and
port number.
 
Old 02-03-2009, 06:06 PM
Momesso Andrea
 
Default Different servers behind the same router

On Tue, Feb 03, 2009 at 01:47:00PM -0500, Saphirus Sage wrote:
>
>
> On Feb 3, 2009, at 12:43 PM, Momesso Andrea <momesso.andrea@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> I have a home server running gentoo for personal use (irc, home
>> entertainment, file server etc.).
>>
>> It is reachable from the internet using a dyamic dns service
>> (dyndns.org).
>>
>> I also have another machine (running gentoo too) that I use as a web
>> server. This machine uses dyndns.org, with a different name.
>>
>> Both machines connect to my modem/router via pppoe so they get 2
>> different IPs.
>>
>> This modem can also be configured to be used as a router so it connects
>> directly to the internet and shares the same IP between the clients.
>>
>> What happens if I decide to switch to the "router" configuration? If I
>> have a single IP for all the machines in the LAN, when someone from the
>> outside will try to connect to homeserver.foo or to webserver.bar, will
>> they be routed to the correct machine?
>>
>> Are there other setups I should look into?
>>
>> =======
>> TopperH
>> =======
> Configure your router for static IP assignment on the LAN and look at your
> router's manual for information about "port forwarding." Simply forward the
> required port from the WAN to the associated LAN IP and port number.

Does it mean that I will need to have one single dyndns name and the
connection will be forwarded depending on the port, or I will still be
able to have different names?

=======
TopperH
=======
 
Old 02-03-2009, 07:20 PM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default Different servers behind the same router

On Tue, 3 Feb 2009 17:52:13 +0000, Stroller wrote:

> No, they will all reach the router's IP address. It will have an
> option for "port forwarding" so that you can forward port 80 to the
> webserver and ports 25 & 110 to the mail server. If you have two
> webservers behind the router then you need to use one to proxy forward
> to the other.

Or run them on different ports.


--
Neil Bothwick

Newspaper Ad: Dog for sale: eats anything and is fond of children.
 
Old 02-03-2009, 10:36 PM
Nikos Chantziaras
 
Default Different servers behind the same router

Momesso Andrea wrote:

On Tue, Feb 03, 2009 at 05:52:13PM +0000, Stroller wrote:

On 3 Feb 2009, at 17:43, Momesso Andrea wrote:

...
What happens if I decide to switch to the "router" configuration? If I
have a single IP for all the machines in the LAN, when someone from the
outside will try to connect to homeserver.foo or to webserver.bar, will
they be routed to the correct machine?
No, they will all reach the router's IP address. It will have an option for
"port forwarding" so that you can forward port 80 to the webserver and
ports 25 & 110 to the mail server. If you have two webservers behind the
router then you need to use one to proxy forward to the other.


"NAT" is another Google keyword.

Stroller.


Is it correct to say that the configuration I alredy have (pppoe and different IPs) is the best choice?


Since your ISP offers you the option to have two different IP, yes that
the best choice. Over here I would have to pay quite some money to get
an extra IP. So you're lucky I guess.


Also, if your ISP allows PPPoA too instead of only PPPoE, use that
instead. It's a bit more optimal due to less overhead. But it's not
critical or something. Just a little and safe optimization.
 
Old 02-04-2009, 12:13 AM
Mike Kazantsev
 
Default Different servers behind the same router

On Wed, 04 Feb 2009 01:36:55 +0200
Nikos Chantziaras <realnc@arcor.de> wrote:

> Since your ISP offers you the option to have two different IP, yes that
> the best choice. Over here I would have to pay quite some money to get
> an extra IP. So you're lucky I guess.

There is plenty of address space on IPv6. One can set up a tunnel, if
ISP doesn't provide it yet.
After that, it's as simple as enabling forwarding in kernel and opening
a FORWARD chain, and you can have 64+ bits of real addresses behind it,
no translation or port forwarding.

And teredo (in form of miredo daemon) offers ability to access IPv6
from anywhere (like public hotspots) w/o setting up any tunneling.

Of course, it's not much use for public server, but certainly useful
for ssh (among over things) to networks behind nat.

--
Mike Kazantsev // fraggod.net
 
Old 02-04-2009, 12:21 AM
Nikos Chantziaras
 
Default Different servers behind the same router

Mike Kazantsev wrote:

On Wed, 04 Feb 2009 01:36:55 +0200
Nikos Chantziaras <realnc@arcor.de> wrote:

Since your ISP offers you the option to have two different IP, yes that
the best choice. Over here I would have to pay quite some money to get
an extra IP. So you're lucky I guess.


There is plenty of address space on IPv6. One can set up a tunnel, if
ISP doesn't provide it yet.
After that, it's as simple as enabling forwarding in kernel and opening
a FORWARD chain, and you can have 64+ bits of real addresses behind it,
no translation or port forwarding.

And teredo (in form of miredo daemon) offers ability to access IPv6
from anywhere (like public hotspots) w/o setting up any tunneling.

Of course, it's not much use for public server, but certainly useful
for ssh (among over things) to networks behind nat.


I can't say I understood what you said, but the majority of ISPs give
clients v4 IPs? Mine for example right now (it's dynamic) is
79.123.149.101. That's the only way to reach me from WAN.
 
Old 02-04-2009, 12:58 AM
Mike Kazantsev
 
Default Different servers behind the same router

On Wed, 04 Feb 2009 03:21:17 +0200
Nikos Chantziaras <realnc@arcor.de> wrote:

> > There is plenty of address space on IPv6. One can set up a tunnel, if
> > ISP doesn't provide it yet.
> > After that, it's as simple as enabling forwarding in kernel and opening
> > a FORWARD chain, and you can have 64+ bits of real addresses behind it,
> > no translation or port forwarding.
> >
> > And teredo (in form of miredo daemon) offers ability to access IPv6
> > from anywhere (like public hotspots) w/o setting up any tunneling.
> >
> > Of course, it's not much use for public server, but certainly useful
> > for ssh (among over things) to networks behind nat.
>
> I can't say I understood what you said, but the majority of ISPs give
> clients v4 IPs? Mine for example right now (it's dynamic) is
> 79.123.149.101. That's the only way to reach me from WAN.

Not quite what I've meant, but just to illustrate a point...

emerge miredo (I think it's ebuild is still in bugzilla)
/etc/init.d/miredo start

And there you go, now you can access this machine by IPv6 address on
teredo interface.

--
Mike Kazantsev // fraggod.net
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 12:57 PM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org