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Old 10-31-2008, 11:46 AM
"James Homuth"
 
Default How to know when a package is due to go stable?

There are several packages that were thrown around on the list, or versions
of packages, that I've come across that I figure I might want to take an
active interest in. However, to avoid sending my boxes into a tailspin, I'm
staying away from installing the still in development versions. What I'd
like to know though is if there's some means of knowing if/when, as an
example, a newer version of Portage is supposed to be considered stable. If
not then I can always keep an eye on the relevant RSS feeds, but it was
mostly just curiosity on my part. Thanks either way.

James
 
Old 10-31-2008, 12:17 PM
Justin
 
Default How to know when a package is due to go stable?

James Homuth schrieb:
> There are several packages that were thrown around on the list, or versions
> of packages, that I've come across that I figure I might want to take an
> active interest in. However, to avoid sending my boxes into a tailspin, I'm
> staying away from installing the still in development versions. What I'd
> like to know though is if there's some means of knowing if/when, as an
> example, a newer version of Portage is supposed to be considered stable. If
> not then I can always keep an eye on the relevant RSS feeds, but it was
> mostly just curiosity on my part. Thanks either way.
>
> James
>
>
>
Quite easy,

emerge --sync
emerge -up world system,

then you know whats gone stable with higher versions.
 
Old 10-31-2008, 01:14 PM
Iain Buchanan
 
Default How to know when a package is due to go stable?

James Homuth wrote:

There are several packages that were thrown around on the list, or versions
of packages, that I've come across that I figure I might want to take an
active interest in. However, to avoid sending my boxes into a tailspin, I'm
staying away from installing the still in development versions.


in development according to whom?


What I'd
like to know though is if there's some means of knowing if/when, as an
example, a newer version of Portage is supposed to be considered stable.


So long as you have ACCEPT_KEYWORDS=x86 (or any arch, but not ~arch)
then it's gentoo stable. Generally this means no (or insignificant)
bugs for about 30 days, and no unstable / masked deps.


Note this has nothing to do with upstream stable, which is defined by
upstream.


Given the keywords above, if you can install it, it's considered stable!


If
not then I can always keep an eye on the relevant RSS feeds, but it was
mostly just curiosity on my part. Thanks either way.


worthwhile for getting juicy info like --keep-going but otherwise not
really necessary.


--
Iain Buchanan <iaindb at netspace dot net dot au>

Alea iacta est.
[The die is cast]
-- Gaius Julius Caesar
 
Old 10-31-2008, 01:37 PM
Nikos Chantziaras
 
Default How to know when a package is due to go stable?

Justin wrote:

James Homuth schrieb:

There are several packages that were thrown around on the list, or versions
of packages, that I've come across that I figure I might want to take an
active interest in. However, to avoid sending my boxes into a tailspin, I'm
staying away from installing the still in development versions. What I'd
like to know though is if there's some means of knowing if/when, as an
example, a newer version of Portage is supposed to be considered stable. If
not then I can always keep an eye on the relevant RSS feeds, but it was
mostly just curiosity on my part. Thanks either way.

James




Quite easy,

emerge --sync
emerge -up world system,

then you know whats gone stable with higher versions.


Or, to also cover packages not in world/system, you can do:

emerge -p1u `qlist -IC`

(Don't omit the "1" from the options or you'll mess up your world file
with packages that are purely dependencies.)


I wonder why emerge doesn't do something like this by default, actually.
Say a package has a serious exploit and an update was made. If the
package isn't in world, emerge will never grab the update.
 
Old 10-31-2008, 01:53 PM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default How to know when a package is due to go stable?

On Fri, 31 Oct 2008 16:37:58 +0200, Nikos Chantziaras wrote:

> I wonder why emerge doesn't do something like this by default,
> actually. Say a package has a serious exploit and an update was made.
> If the package isn't in world, emerge will never grab the update.

If it's not is world, or a dependency of a world package, it's not needed
and --depclean will catch it.


--
Neil Bothwick

IBM - I Blame Microsoft
 
Old 10-31-2008, 03:11 PM
Nikos Chantziaras
 
Default How to know when a package is due to go stable?

Neil Bothwick wrote:

On Fri, 31 Oct 2008 16:37:58 +0200, Nikos Chantziaras wrote:


I wonder why emerge doesn't do something like this by default,
actually. Say a package has a serious exploit and an update was made.
If the package isn't in world, emerge will never grab the update.


If it's not is world, or a dependency of a world package, it's not needed
and --depclean will catch it.


No, it will not :P Don't ask me why, because I don't know. I only know
from experience that --depclean does not catch some packages that get
updated with "emerge -1u `qlist -IC`" (and don't get updated with
"emerge -uD world system").
 
Old 10-31-2008, 03:23 PM
"James Homuth"
 
Default How to know when a package is due to go stable?

-----Original Message-----
From: news [mailto:news@ger.gmane.org] On Behalf Of Nikos Chantziaras
Sent: October 31, 2008 10:38 AM
To: gentoo-user@lists.gentoo.org
Subject: [gentoo-user] Re: How to know when a package is due to go stable?

Justin wrote:
> James Homuth schrieb:
>> There are several packages that were thrown around on the list, or
>> versions of packages, that I've come across that I figure I might
>> want to take an active interest in. However, to avoid sending my
>> boxes into a tailspin, I'm staying away from installing the still in
>> development versions. What I'd like to know though is if there's some
>> means of knowing if/when, as an example, a newer version of Portage
>> is supposed to be considered stable. If not then I can always keep an
>> eye on the relevant RSS feeds, but it was mostly just curiosity on my
part. Thanks either way.
>>
>> James
>>
>>
>>
> Quite easy,
>
> emerge --sync
> emerge -up world system,
>
> then you know whats gone stable with higher versions.

Or, to also cover packages not in world/system, you can do:

emerge -p1u `qlist -IC`

(Don't omit the "1" from the options or you'll mess up your world file with
packages that are purely dependencies.)

I wonder why emerge doesn't do something like this by default, actually.
Say a package has a serious exploit and an update was made. If the
package isn't in world, emerge will never grab the update.


That'll teach me to just read the Gentoo documentation. I figured emerge
--update --deep world covered system, too.
 
Old 10-31-2008, 03:54 PM
Dale
 
Default How to know when a package is due to go stable?

James Homuth wrote:
>
>
> That'll teach me to just read the Gentoo documentation. I figured emerge
> --update --deep world covered system, too.
>
>
>
>

As far as what I was told on -dev, it still does. If you use the
@system or @world, then that is a different thing. I'm assuming what I
was told still holds true.

Dale

:-) :-)

P.S. Yea, I'm back. I had a reaction to some meds and they dang near
killed me. Spent about a week in the hospital wondering what that light
was. o_O
 
Old 10-31-2008, 04:27 PM
Justin
 
Default How to know when a package is due to go stable?

James Homuth schrieb:
> There are several packages that were thrown around on the list, or versions
> of packages, that I've come across that I figure I might want to take an
> active interest in. However, to avoid sending my boxes into a tailspin, I'm
> staying away from installing the still in development versions. What I'd
> like to know though is if there's some means of knowing if/when, as an
> example, a newer version of Portage is supposed to be considered stable. If
> not then I can always keep an eye on the relevant RSS feeds, but it was
> mostly just curiosity on my part. Thanks either way.
>
> James
>
>
>
eix -uc
 
Old 10-31-2008, 10:05 PM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default How to know when a package is due to go stable?

On Fri, 31 Oct 2008 18:11:20 +0200, Nikos Chantziaras wrote:

> > If it's not is world, or a dependency of a world package, it's not
> > needed and --depclean will catch it.
>
> No, it will not :P Don't ask me why, because I don't know. I only
> know from experience that --depclean does not catch some packages that
> get updated with "emerge -1u `qlist -IC`" (and don't get updated with
> "emerge -uD world system").

Possibly build time dependencies, which aren't updated unless you use
--with-bdeps y.


--
Neil Bothwick

There's too much blood in my caffeine system.
 

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