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Old 10-28-2008, 04:39 PM
Ricardo Saffi Marques
 
Default package.keywords syntax?

Andrey Vul wrote:
> That looks like it'll only work in paludis. You're going to have to
> use shell scripting and output a BFList to package.keywords .
> Try $eix -C kde-base --only-names | sed -r 's/$/ -~amd64/' | sudo tee
> -a /etc/portage/package.keywords

Don't you guys like (or maybe even know) "autounmask"?

[15:34:56] saffi@quasar ~ $ eix autounmask
* app-portage/autounmask
Available versions: 0.15 0.21
Homepage: http://download.mpsna.de/opensource/autounmask/
Description: autounmask - Unmasking packages the easy way

Best regards,

Saffi

--
Ricardo Saffi Marques
http://www.las.ic.unicamp.br/~saffi/
================================================== ====
Laboratory of System Administration and Security - LAS
Institute of Computing - IC
P.O. Box: 6176
University of Campinas - UNICAMP
13083-852, Campinas, SP, Brazil
================================================== ====
 
Old 10-28-2008, 04:49 PM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default package.keywords syntax?

On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 15:39:14 -0200, Ricardo Saffi Marques wrote:

> Don't you guys like (or maybe even know) "autounmask"?

Yes, but it unmasks, not masks.


--
Neil Bothwick

Yoda of the Borg am I. Futile, resistance is. Be assimilated, you will.
 
Old 10-28-2008, 07:29 PM
"Andrey Vul"
 
Default package.keywords syntax?

On Tue, Oct 28, 2008 at 1:39 PM, Ricardo Saffi Marques
<saffi@las.ic.unicamp.br> wrote:
> Andrey Vul wrote:
>> That looks like it'll only work in paludis. You're going to have to
>> use shell scripting and output a BFList to package.keywords .
>> Try $eix -C kde-base --only-names | sed -r 's/$/ -~amd64/' | sudo tee
>> -a /etc/portage/package.keywords
>
> Don't you guys like (or maybe even know) "autounmask"?
You're giving the exact opposite of what was requested in the question.
The relevant part of the question was "Is it possible to *revoke* [the
~amd64 for kde]"

If it was *unmasking*, then yes, I would have mentioned autounmask.
But the OP asked about revoking (unmasks), not unmasking.
If you want to make an automask script that does the work for you, go ahead.

--
Andrey Vul

A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?
A: Top-posting.
Q: What is the most annoying thing in e-mail?
 
Old 10-28-2008, 08:01 PM
Alan McKinnon
 
Default package.keywords syntax?

On Tuesday 28 October 2008 22:29:39 Andrey Vul wrote:
> On Tue, Oct 28, 2008 at 1:39 PM, Ricardo Saffi Marques
>
> <saffi@las.ic.unicamp.br> wrote:
> > Andrey Vul wrote:
> >> That looks like it'll only work in paludis. You're going to have to
> >> use shell scripting and output a BFList to package.keywords .
> >> Try $eix -C kde-base --only-names | sed -r 's/$/ -~amd64/' | sudo tee
> >> -a /etc/portage/package.keywords
> >
> > Don't you guys like (or maybe even know) "autounmask"?
>
> You're giving the exact opposite of what was requested in the question.
> The relevant part of the question was "Is it possible to *revoke* [the
> ~amd64 for kde]"
>
> If it was *unmasking*, then yes, I would have mentioned autounmask.
> But the OP asked about revoking (unmasks), not unmasking.
> If you want to make an automask script that does the work for you, go
> ahead.

Run autounmask, it creates a new file in /etc/portage/package.unmask/

Run a quick awk on it to get it into shape

Move file to /etc/portage/package.mask/

Problem solved in a neat elegant insightful way.

--
alan dot mckinnon at gmail dot com
 
Old 10-28-2008, 08:34 PM
"Jorge Peixoto de Morais Neto"
 
Default package.keywords syntax?

> Run autounmask, it creates a new file in /etc/portage/package.unmask/
>
> Run a quick awk on it to get it into shape
>
> Move file to /etc/portage/package.mask/
>
> Problem solved in a neat elegant insightful way.

awk? I assumed it was an obsolete language included for compatibility.
People should use Python, Perl, or sed's "s" command. Am I wrong?

--
Software is like sex: it is better when it is free - Linus Torvalds
 
Old 10-28-2008, 08:47 PM
Robert Bridge
 
Default package.keywords syntax?

On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 19:34:31 -0200
"Jorge Peixoto de Morais Neto" <please.no.spam.here@gmail.com> wrote:

> > Run autounmask, it creates a new file
> > in /etc/portage/package.unmask/
> >
> > Run a quick awk on it to get it into shape
> >
> > Move file to /etc/portage/package.mask/
> >
> > Problem solved in a neat elegant insightful way.
>
> awk? I assumed it was an obsolete language included for compatibility.
> People should use Python, Perl, or sed's "s" command. Am I wrong?

Yes. You are wrong.

Awk is a useful tool, if you know it. It's just less people bother
learning it these days.
 
Old 10-28-2008, 08:56 PM
Alan McKinnon
 
Default package.keywords syntax?

On Tuesday 28 October 2008 23:34:31 Jorge Peixoto de Morais Neto wrote:
> > Run autounmask, it creates a new file in /etc/portage/package.unmask/
> >
> > Run a quick awk on it to get it into shape
> >
> > Move file to /etc/portage/package.mask/
> >
> > Problem solved in a neat elegant insightful way.
>
> awk? I assumed it was an obsolete language included for compatibility.
> People should use Python, Perl, or sed's "s" command. Am I wrong?

Yes. You are indeed wrong.

Python and Perl are humungous interpreters that rival Java for size. Perl is
in a class of it's own for syntax bloat.

sed is neat but has nowhere near the functionality of awk.

For example, I recently needed to scan a massive text file of 89000+ lines and
count the number of character on each line and print it out with the line
number. A bash script took 20 seconds to run. A C script took less than half
a second. An awk script was marginally *quicker*. Granted, most of that time
is spent writing to the console, but the text processing must then also be on
par with C.

awk is not obsolete, it's just been around for a while. It's no more obsoleted
by perl, python and sed than ls is obsoleted by the existence of gui file
managers

--
alan dot mckinnon at gmail dot com
 
Old 10-28-2008, 09:17 PM
"Jorge Peixoto de Morais Neto"
 
Default package.keywords syntax?

>> awk? I assumed it was an obsolete language included for compatibility.
>> People should use Python, Perl, or sed's "s" command. Am I wrong?
>
> Yes. You are indeed wrong.
>
> Python and Perl are humungous interpreters that rival Java for size. Perl is
> in a class of it's own for syntax bloat.
>
> sed is neat but has nowhere near the functionality of awk.
>
> For example, I recently needed to scan a massive text file of 89000+ lines and
> count the number of character on each line and print it out with the line
> number. A bash script took 20 seconds to run. A C script took less than half
> a second. An awk script was marginally *quicker*. Granted, most of that time
> is spent writing to the console, but the text processing must then also be on
> par with C.
>
> awk is not obsolete, it's just been around for a while. It's no more obsoleted
> by perl, python and sed than ls is obsoleted by the existence of gui file
> managers
Nice. I might learn it in the future (there are some urgent duties I
must to before, and then I want to learn C* and Python**. Then I may
study awk)

* Before you ask "what, you don't know C?", I mean to really know C,
that is, read a rigorous book such as "C: A Reference Manual" and be
able to write portable programs with well-defined behavior. Speaking
of well-defined behavior, do you know what happens when you cast a
float to an int, and the float is too big to fit into the int?
** I know basic Python, but I think Python is nice enough for a person
to *really* know it.

--
Software is like sex: it is better when it is free - Linus Torvalds
 
Old 10-28-2008, 09:41 PM
Alan McKinnon
 
Default package.keywords syntax?

On Wednesday 29 October 2008 00:17:50 Jorge Peixoto de Morais Neto wrote:
> * Before you ask "what, you don't know C?",

A sysadmin doesn't need to know C. It helps to be able to read it of course.

A sysadmin ought to know grep, sed and awk rather well and be quite fluent in
either perl or python, simply becuase those are tools they will use every day

> I mean to really know C,
> that is, read a rigorous book such as "C: A Reference Manual" and be
> able to write portable programs with well-defined behavior. Speaking
> of well-defined behavior, do you know what happens when you cast a
> float to an int, and the float is too big to fit into the int?

Did oyu try it yourself and see?

> ** I know basic Python, but I think Python is nice enough for a person
> to *really* know it.

Agreed. It's a very nice language and has some nice side effects on your
thinking. Like realising that the "new" keyword is an OOP language is always
completely redundant. Or how many brain cycles you use parsing { and }.

Many people like to bitch about Python's enforcement of coding style. But we
all agree that indentation is good. We disagree sometimes how exactly to do
it. Python assumes that you start using the style you like and simply
enforces that you carry on with it (which you were going to do anyway....)

That appeals to me - cut to the chase, toss out the irrelevant crap and
concentrate on what's left - the important stuff

--
alan dot mckinnon at gmail dot com
 
Old 10-28-2008, 09:55 PM
"Jorge Peixoto de Morais Neto"
 
Default package.keywords syntax?

>> I mean to really know C,
>> that is, read a rigorous book such as "C: A Reference Manual" and be
>> able to write portable programs with well-defined behavior. Speaking
>> of well-defined behavior, do you know what happens when you cast a
>> float to an int, and the float is too big to fit into the int?
>
> Did oyu try it yourself and see?
The point is that the behavior in this situation is "undefined". It
might do anything. Programming in C is different than programming in
Python.
In Python, you must know the basic behavior of a statement/functions.
If an error occurs, it raises an exception. If you do not catch the
exception, the program exits (and you can arrange for cleanup actions
to be performed before the program exits).
In C, you must know exactly what the statement/function does, and you
*must* handle the possibility of errors. If an error occurs and you do
not handle it, the program may crash, or it may go on and behave
erratically (such as deleting user files, or giving results subtly
wrong, or leaking memory, or...)
--
Software is like sex: it is better when it is free - Linus Torvalds
 

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