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Old 07-23-2008, 08:09 AM
"Kaushal Shriyan"
 
Default ps command

Hi

# ps auxw | egrep "USER|rsync"

root***** 5301* 0.0* 0.0* 10036* 1280 ?******* Ss** 01:13
root***** 5306* 0.2* 0.1* 56212 31912 pts/0*** S+** 01:14
root***** 5307* 0.0* 0.1* 38052 29708 pts/0*** S+** 01:14

root***** 5308* 0.2* 0.1* 38312 29672 pts/0*** S+** 01:18
root***** 5473* 0.0* 0.0** 2660** 592 ttyS1*** R+

what does Ss and S+ and R+ mean in stat column in ps command

Thanks and Regards

Kaushal
 
Old 07-23-2008, 08:18 AM
Pintér Tibor
 
Default ps command

man ps

t

Kaushal Shriyan wrote:

Hi

# ps auxw | egrep "USER|rsync"

root 5301 0.0 0.0 10036 1280 ? Ss 01:13
root 5306 0.2 0.1 56212 31912 pts/0 S+ 01:14
root 5307 0.0 0.1 38052 29708 pts/0 S+ 01:14
root 5308 0.2 0.1 38312 29672 pts/0 S+ 01:18
root 5473 0.0 0.0 2660 592 ttyS1 R+

what does Ss and S+ and R+ mean in stat column in ps command

Thanks and Regards

Kaushal
 
Old 07-23-2008, 09:11 AM
Neil Bothwick
 
Default ps command

On Wed, 23 Jul 2008 10:18:57 +0200, Pintér Tibor wrote:

> man ps

Top posting ignorance and RTFM rudeness in only six characters, how
concise!


--
Neil Bothwick

new oxymoron: final beta
 
Old 07-23-2008, 09:23 AM
"Alan McKinnon"
 
Default ps command

On Wed, Jul 23, 2008 at 10:09 AM, Kaushal Shriyan <kaushalshriyan@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi

# ps auxw | egrep "USER|rsync"

root***** 5301* 0.0* 0.0* 10036* 1280 ?******* Ss** 01:13
root***** 5306* 0.2* 0.1* 56212 31912 pts/0*** S+** 01:14
root***** 5307* 0.0* 0.1* 38052 29708 pts/0*** S+** 01:14


root***** 5308* 0.2* 0.1* 38312 29672 pts/0*** S+** 01:18
root***** 5473* 0.0* 0.0** 2660** 592 ttyS1*** R+

what does Ss and S+ and R+ mean in stat column in ps command
man ps, section "PROCESS STATE CODES"




Briefly,



S means sleeping

R means running or runnable



s means the process is a session leader

+ means the process is running in the foreground



Is that enough, or do you need more explanation?
*

--
Alan McKinnon
alan.mckinnon@gmail.com
 
Old 07-24-2008, 10:41 AM
"b.n."
 
Default ps command

Alan McKinnon ha scritto:
On Wed, Jul 23, 2008 at 10:09 AM, Kaushal Shriyan
<kaushalshriyan@gmail.com <mailto:kaushalshriyan@gmail.com>> wrote:


Hi

# ps auxw | egrep "USER|rsync"

root 5301 0.0 0.0 10036 1280 ? Ss 01:13
root 5306 0.2 0.1 56212 31912 pts/0 S+ 01:14
root 5307 0.0 0.1 38052 29708 pts/0 S+ 01:14
root 5308 0.2 0.1 38312 29672 pts/0 S+ 01:18
root 5473 0.0 0.0 2660 592 ttyS1 R+

what does Ss and S+ and R+ mean in stat column in ps command


man ps, section "PROCESS STATE CODES"

Briefly,

S means sleeping
R means running or runnable

s means the process is a session leader
+ means the process is running in the foreground


I jump here to relief my everlasting UNIX ignorance.

What does it mean a process is "sleeping", technically?

m.
 
Old 07-24-2008, 10:51 AM
Etaoin Shrdlu
 
Default ps command

On Thursday 24 July 2008, 12:41, b.n. wrote:

> > S means sleeping
> > R means running or runnable
> >
> > s means the process is a session leader
> > + means the process is running in the foreground
>
> I jump here to relief my everlasting UNIX ignorance.
>
> What does it mean a process is "sleeping", technically?

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Process_states
 
Old 07-24-2008, 03:09 PM
Alan McKinnon
 
Default ps command

On Thursday 24 July 2008, b.n. wrote:

>
> I jump here to relief my everlasting UNIX ignorance.
>
> What does it mean a process is "sleeping", technically?

It's a misnomer, it means "not running".

The cpu gives the illusion of executing many tasks simultaneously. In
reality, it is executing them one at a time and very rapidly (many
times a second) switching between them.

Normally at a given instant in time, one task is running per cpu. The
rest are mostly waiting their turn or sleeping. There are various OS
strategies for bringing this about - some rely on the task itself to
back out after a running for a short while, sometimes the OS kernel
enforces it, sometimes you have a combination. If everything is working
nicely, the end result is pretty much the same.

There's another state worthy of note - blocked. This is when a task is
waiting for something else to happen first (most often disk or network
I/O) so it won't try and execute till that other thing happens. This is
not the same as sleeping. Sleeping is spinning you wheels in idle,
blocked is a deliberate stop and sit back and wait.

hth

alan


--
Alan McKinnon
alan dot mckinnon at gmail dot com
 
Old 07-24-2008, 03:32 PM
Etaoin Shrdlu
 
Default ps command

On Thursday 24 July 2008, 17:09, Alan McKinnon wrote:

> > What does it mean a process is "sleeping", technically?
>
> It's a misnomer, it means "not running".
>
> The cpu gives the illusion of executing many tasks simultaneously. In
> reality, it is executing them one at a time and very rapidly (many
> times a second) switching between them.
>
> Normally at a given instant in time, one task is running per cpu. The
> rest are mostly waiting their turn or sleeping. There are various OS
> strategies for bringing this about - some rely on the task itself to
> back out after a running for a short while, sometimes the OS kernel
> enforces it, sometimes you have a combination. If everything is
> working nicely, the end result is pretty much the same.
>
> There's another state worthy of note - blocked. This is when a task is
> waiting for something else to happen first (most often disk or network
> I/O) so it won't try and execute till that other thing happens. This
> is not the same as sleeping. Sleeping is spinning you wheels in idle,
> blocked is a deliberate stop and sit back and wait.

From what I know, "blocked" is the same as "sleeping", ie waiting for
something to happen. Tasks that have completed their time slice and are
forced by the scheduler to stop, are not "sleeping"; they are
re-inserted in the queue of the runnable processes, and the scheduler
picks them up again from there when another time slice is assigned to
them. These processes are in the "runnable" or "ready" state.

But of course I may be wrong, so corrections welcome.
 
Old 07-24-2008, 09:30 PM
"b.n."
 
Default ps command

Etaoin Shrdlu ha scritto:
> From what I know, "blocked" is the same as "sleeping", ie waiting for
something to happen. Tasks that have completed their time slice and are
forced by the scheduler to stop, are not "sleeping"; they are
re-inserted in the queue of the runnable processes, and the scheduler
picks them up again from there when another time slice is assigned to
them. These processes are in the "runnable" or "ready" state.


But of course I may be wrong, so corrections welcome.


Thanks, the wikipedia article is very clear.

m.
 

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