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Old 05-28-2008, 11:31 PM
Frank Cox
 
Default how to find WEP/WPA key to network if possible

On Wed, 28 May 2008 16:22:55 -0700 (PDT)
Antonio Olivares <olivares14031@yahoo.com> wrote:

> How does one get a KEY to a secured network that could be WEP/WPA?

The purpose of WEP or WPA is to insure (to the extent possible) that only
authorized computers (with keys) can use the network.

The proper way to obtain a key is to approach the person who is in charge of
the network and request authorization. If he approves, he will issue you the
required key.

--
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Old 05-28-2008, 11:46 PM
Antonio Olivares
 
Default how to find WEP/WPA key to network if possible

> ----- Original Message ----
> From: Frank Cox <theatre@sasktel.net>
> To: For users of Fedora <fedora-list@redhat.com>
> Cc: Antonio Olivares <olivares14031@yahoo.com>
> Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2008 6:31:56 PM
> Subject: Re: how to find WEP/WPA key to network if possible
>
> On Wed, 28 May 2008 16:22:55 -0700 (PDT)
> Antonio Olivares <olivares14031@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > How does one get a KEY to a secured network that could be WEP/WPA?
>
> The purpose of WEP or WPA is to insure (to the extent possible) that only
> authorized computers (with keys) can use the network.
>
> The proper way to obtain a key is to approach the person who is in charge of
> the network and request authorization.* If he approves, he will issue you the
> required key.
>
> --
> MELVILLE THEATRE ~ Melville Sask ~ http://www.melvilletheatre.com

The guy is on vacation, A teacher needs to connect to the network to teach a lesson.* Nothing illegal or bad.* Otherwise I would not ask this question.* I do not want to use unauthorized network without permission.* I can ask permission from Administration, but the guy that knows the key is not here.* If there is no way to do it, then I rest my case!* The person can die and then the key is lost to the network.* There has to be a way to do it.* The computer could access the network before. it was set up by wireless dhcp, but now someone who manages the network put a key and many users(teachers) cannot access the internet.* The person that takes care of that is on vacation.* Is there a way or not?
That is all that I am asking.
Thanks,
Antonio




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Old 05-28-2008, 11:55 PM
Todd Zullinger
 
Default how to find WEP/WPA key to network if possible

Antonio Olivares wrote:
> The guy is on vacation, A teacher needs to connect to the network to
> teach a lesson.* Nothing illegal or bad.* Otherwise I would not ask
> this question.* I do not want to use unauthorized network without
> permission.* I can ask permission from Administration, but the guy
> that knows the key is not here.

Then have someone with phisical access change or disable the password.
And prepare an ass whipping for the admin that setup a password and
didn't ensure someone else knew it before leaving for vacation.

> If there is no way to do it, then I rest my case!* The person can
> die and then the key is lost to the network.* There has to be a way
> to do it.

The simplest way is to reset it via the admin interface of the
wireless device. Anyone with legitimate access would do it that way.

WEP can be easily cracked with various tools. WPA is a bit more
secure AIUI.

The bottom line is that the way to find the password is to look in the
admin interface for the wireless device.

--
Todd OpenPGP -> KeyID: 0xBEAF0CE3 | URL: www.pobox.com/~tmz/pgp
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Common sense is genius dressed in its working clothes.
-- Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Old 05-29-2008, 12:00 AM
"Mikkel L. Ellertson"
 
Default how to find WEP/WPA key to network if possible

Antonio Olivares wrote:

Dear all,
How does one get a KEY to a secured network that could be WEP/WPA?
Why we had a unsecured wireless network at school and I could
connect with a laptop. Everything got configured automatically, now,
the computer does not connect automatically. It is asking for a KEY
and I do not know the key. The Network Administrator is hard to
find/on vacation. Is there a way easy/hard to find the key so that I
can connect to this network?
TIA,
Antonio

Depending on the setup, you may be able to make a wired connection
to the wireless router, and get the key from one of the status
pages. You can also find out if it is using WPA or WEP at the same time.


Mikkel
--

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons,
for thou art crunchy and taste good with Ketchup!

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Old 05-29-2008, 12:06 AM
Frank Cox
 
Default how to find WEP/WPA key to network if possible

On Wed, 28 May 2008 16:46:00 -0700 (PDT)
Antonio Olivares <olivares14031@yahoo.com> wrote:

> I can ask permission from Administration, but the guy that knows the key is not here.*

Then you have a problem that's not of your making.

Take the necessary steps to request a key. If it is not possible to obtain one
due to someone's vacation, insure that the next person up-the-ladder is aware
of the situation (send a memo, literally) and then it becomes that person's
problem to either resolve immediately or tell you to wait for the vacationing
person to return.

Either way, it's out of your hands. I would not recommend attempting to crack
someone's network, even with the best of intentions.

Now, if the only guy who knows how this stuff works has died, then the solution
is to document the problem and obtain permission to reset the routers and set
the network up again if you're the one who's to replace the deceased. If you're
not that person, then you make your request for authorization and a key to the
person who is replacing the deceased.

--
MELVILLE THEATRE ~ Melville Sask ~ http://www.melvilletheatre.com

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Old 05-29-2008, 12:28 AM
"Kevin J. Cummings"
 
Default how to find WEP/WPA key to network if possible

Mikkel L. Ellertson wrote:

Antonio Olivares wrote:

Dear all,
How does one get a KEY to a secured network that could be WEP/WPA?
Why we had a unsecured wireless network at school and I could
connect with a laptop. Everything got configured automatically, now,
the computer does not connect automatically. It is asking for a KEY
and I do not know the key. The Network Administrator is hard to
find/on vacation. Is there a way easy/hard to find the key so that I
can connect to this network?
TIA,
Antonio

Depending on the setup, you may be able to make a wired connection to
the wireless router, and get the key from one of the status pages. You
can also find out if it is using WPA or WEP at the same time.


Why can't the wireless key be found from some other laptop that's using
the network. If this is a school, and you are a teacher (I'm talking
about Antonio here), then another teacher must have configured the
wireless key on their laptop, no? If not, then maybe the woreless isn;t
for the teachers?


The only way this won't work is if the router is also doing MAC
filtering in addition to the wireless key. (Even then, there are ways
around that too, but beyond what I said above, we're talking about
hacking, which some in the administration may frown upon....)



Mikkel


--
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kjchome@rcn.com
cummings@kjchome.homeip.net
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Old 05-29-2008, 12:51 AM
"Mikkel L. Ellertson"
 
Default how to find WEP/WPA key to network if possible

Kevin J. Cummings wrote:


Why can't the wireless key be found from some other laptop that's using
the network. If this is a school, and you are a teacher (I'm talking
about Antonio here), then another teacher must have configured the
wireless key on their laptop, no? If not, then maybe the woreless isn;t
for the teachers?


The only way this won't work is if the router is also doing MAC
filtering in addition to the wireless key. (Even then, there are ways
around that too, but beyond what I said above, we're talking about
hacking, which some in the administration may frown upon....)


Well, finding the wireless key on a Windows laptop can be
interesting. I am guessing you would have to dig into the registry
to find it. I know it is hidden when you look at the wireless
settings. (Like when you enter a password.) I have not dug into the
registry to see if it is encoded there.


Now, if the administrator did things right, there should be a
network setup USB key or disk with all the network settings needed
to connect to the wireless network. It is set up so that all you
need to do is put it in and auto-run it - it sets things up without
the user having to know the details or the key. It makes setting up
a new computer to connect to the wireless network a snap.


Mikkel
--

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for thou art crunchy and taste good with Ketchup!

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Old 05-29-2008, 01:06 AM
"Kevin J. Cummings"
 
Default how to find WEP/WPA key to network if possible

Mikkel L. Ellertson wrote:

Kevin J. Cummings wrote:


Why can't the wireless key be found from some other laptop that's
using the network. If this is a school, and you are a teacher (I'm
talking about Antonio here), then another teacher must have configured
the wireless key on their laptop, no? If not, then maybe the woreless
isn;t for the teachers?


The only way this won't work is if the router is also doing MAC
filtering in addition to the wireless key. (Even then, there are ways
around that too, but beyond what I said above, we're talking about
hacking, which some in the administration may frown upon....)


Well, finding the wireless key on a Windows laptop can be interesting. I
am guessing you would have to dig into the registry to find it. I know
it is hidden when you look at the wireless settings. (Like when you
enter a password.) I have not dug into the registry to see if it is
encoded there.


Well, my experience is that I've help to configure 2 different laptops
under windows xp, and in both cases, the wireless key was available from
the configuration tool in plain text. YMMV.


Now, if the administrator did things right, there should be a network
setup USB key or disk with all the network settings needed to connect to
the wireless network. It is set up so that all you need to do is put it
in and auto-run it - it sets things up without the user having to know
the details or the key. It makes setting up a new computer to connect to
the wireless network a snap.


That used to be called a network configuration floppy. B^) Yeah, I
remember when ms first introduced that feature. How to configure other
machines on your network to use your windows gateway without knowing the
details of the network.



Mikkel


--
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kjchome@rcn.com
cummings@kjchome.homeip.net
cummings@kjc386.framingham.ma.us
Registered Linux User #1232 (http://counter.li.org)

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Old 05-29-2008, 02:43 AM
Antonio Olivares
 
Default how to find WEP/WPA key to network if possible

--- "Kevin J. Cummings" <cummings@kjchome.homeip.net>
wrote:

> Mikkel L. Ellertson wrote:
> > Kevin J. Cummings wrote:
> >>
> >> Why can't the wireless key be found from some
> other laptop that's
> >> using the network. If this is a school, and you
> are a teacher (I'm
> >> talking about Antonio here), then another teacher
> must have configured
> >> the wireless key on their laptop, no? If not,
> then maybe the woreless
> >> isn;t for the teachers?
> >>
> >> The only way this won't work is if the router is
> also doing MAC
> >> filtering in addition to the wireless key. (Even
> then, there are ways
> >> around that too, but beyond what I said above,
> we're talking about
> >> hacking, which some in the administration may
> frown upon....)
> >>
> > Well, finding the wireless key on a Windows laptop
> can be interesting. I
> > am guessing you would have to dig into the
> registry to find it. I know
> > it is hidden when you look at the wireless
> settings. (Like when you
> > enter a password.) I have not dug into the
> registry to see if it is
> > encoded there.
>
> Well, my experience is that I've help to configure 2
> different laptops
> under windows xp, and in both cases, the wireless
> key was available from
> the configuration tool in plain text. YMMV.
>
> > Now, if the administrator did things right, there
> should be a network
> > setup USB key or disk with all the network
> settings needed to connect to
> > the wireless network. It is set up so that all you
> need to do is put it
> > in and auto-run it - it sets things up without the
> user having to know
> > the details or the key. It makes setting up a new
> computer to connect to
> > the wireless network a snap.
>
That's what some teachers got to do after the Network
became encrypted. They took their computers to the
Administrator and he put the key in for them and they
are happily surfing. Other teachers that seldom use
their laptops, brought it to school only to find out
that they cannot use the wireless network because it
has a new key that they need to put in to be able to
use it. This happened without warning and some of my
colleagues are mad. I do not know what to tell them.
I wish I knew more about wireless networking.

I appreciate all of your comments and input in this
matter.
>
> That used to be called a network configuration
> floppy. B^) Yeah, I
> remember when ms first introduced that feature. How
> to configure other
> machines on your network to use your windows gateway
> without knowing the
> details of the network.
>
> > Mikkel
>
> --
> Kevin J. Cummings
> kjchome@rcn.com
> cummings@kjchome.homeip.net
> cummings@kjc386.framingham.ma.us
> Registered Linux User #1232 (http://counter.li.org)
>
> --

Regards,

Antonio




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Old 05-29-2008, 03:23 AM
max
 
Default how to find WEP/WPA key to network if possible

Antonio Olivares wrote:

----- Original Message ----
From: Frank Cox <theatre@sasktel.net>
To: For users of Fedora <fedora-list@redhat.com>
Cc: Antonio Olivares <olivares14031@yahoo.com>
Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2008 6:31:56 PM
Subject: Re: how to find WEP/WPA key to network if possible

On Wed, 28 May 2008 16:22:55 -0700 (PDT)
Antonio Olivares <olivares14031@yahoo.com> wrote:


How does one get a KEY to a secured network that could be WEP/WPA?

The purpose of WEP or WPA is to insure (to the extent possible) that only
authorized computers (with keys) can use the network.

The proper way to obtain a key is to approach the person who is in charge of
the network and request authorization. If he approves, he will issue you the
required key.

--
MELVILLE THEATRE ~ Melville Sask ~ http://www.melvilletheatre.com


The guy is on vacation, A teacher needs to connect to the network to teach a lesson. Nothing illegal or bad. Otherwise I would not ask this question. I do not want to use unauthorized network without permission. I can ask permission from Administration, but the guy that knows the key is not here. If there is no way to do it, then I rest my case! The person can die and then the key is lost to the network. There has to be a way to do it. The computer could access the network before. it was set up by wireless dhcp, but now someone who manages the network put a key and many users(teachers) cannot access the internet. The person that takes care of that is on vacation. Is there a way or not?
That is all that I am asking.
Thanks,
Antonio







WEP is easily broken in under 5 minutes with the right tools. There are
plenty of how-to's strewn across the net. WPA is another matter as far
as I know. The last time I looked it was brute-force only, which means
dictionary attack which of course assumes that the password is in the
dictionary. WPA is weird, it can be easy or near impossible to break
depends on how strong a passphrase was used, is there a RADIUS server?.
WPA is generally very difficult if the admin has enough sense to use a
long and truly random passphrase but admins like that are in short
supply. If you really want to know google will throw up many links to
info. There may be a tool by now that makes short work of WPA . You can
get in trouble for trying to break into a network, the right person has
to give permission before you can even try. Careful I don't want to see
you on CNN unless your promoting free software :^) In any case you will
need a wireless card that can be put in monitor mode to capture the
necessary traffic, not all cards support this, if you can't put your
card into monitor mode then don't bother. Google can give you more
specifics if you really want them.



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