FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > Redhat > Fedora User

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 10-07-2012, 09:07 PM
Tim
 
Default Fedora fails to boot with systemd-journald failing

Tim:
>> Not really a good idea, but most particularly not keeping boot
>> separate. Nothing wrong with the other stuff being on one partition,
>> you just need to make the change carefully.

Daniel Landau:
> There's no reason why you couldn't keep everything on one partition.
> One possible reason could be having an ext2 boot partition and
> something more exciting for the rest, but I don't think my problem is
> with booting off ext4.

Everything but boot can easily be in one partition, but there's one very
good reason that boot *may* *need* to be in its own partition at the
start of the drive: Some BIOSes just can't read far enough into a drive
to start booting up. And what may seem to work, at first, may fail
later on, as newer files (needed to boot the system) get written further
into the drive. Such as when you install new kernels.

So, it (no boot partition) could well be a cause of a failure to boot,
though I'm not sure what sort of error message you'll see when that is
the problem. I'd expect some sort of file not found error, though.

I like partitioning the installation, so that should a drive error
happen, or the system does a check when it thinks there may be one, it's
a lot quicker to check a small partition than one huge one. Not to
mention that a file screw-up in a non-home partition is far less likely
to screw up personal files. And having a separate home partition makes
updating a lot easier: You can update a system, and keep personal files
in place. My current preference for a minimally partitioned system is
boot, /, and home. If I were doing more partitions, or spreading across
drive, I like separate var and tmp.

Other people see other advantages to partitioning: Such as different
file systems, or mounting options, for different partitions, more
optimum to that part of the system.

I have, in the past, moved partitions like you've done. Copied the
files to the new location, unmounted the old partition. Generally it
worked without any dramas, other than remembering to set permissions
correctly on the tmp directory. Sometimes a relabelling may be needed,
depending on how you copied/moved things over. But you'd need to be
able to boot up, first, for that. Again, you'd get a different kind of
error message than you mentioned.

Moving boot requires more than just copying files, and changing
pointers. There are bootloaders in the partitions.

How did you do the copying? With a file manager, the command line, done
as the root user?

--
[tim@localhost ~]$ uname -r
2.6.27.25-78.2.56.fc9.i686

Don't send private replies to my address, the mailbox is ignored. I
read messages from the public lists.




--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
Have a question? Ask away: http://ask.fedoraproject.org
 
Old 10-07-2012, 09:15 PM
"Eddie G. O'Connor Jr."
 
Default Fedora fails to boot with systemd-journald failing

On 10/07/2012 05:07 PM, Tim wrote:

Tim:

Not really a good idea, but most particularly not keeping boot
separate. Nothing wrong with the other stuff being on one partition,
you just need to make the change carefully.

Daniel Landau:

There's no reason why you couldn't keep everything on one partition.
One possible reason could be having an ext2 boot partition and
something more exciting for the rest, but I don't think my problem is
with booting off ext4.

Everything but boot can easily be in one partition, but there's one very
good reason that boot *may* *need* to be in its own partition at the
start of the drive: Some BIOSes just can't read far enough into a drive
to start booting up. And what may seem to work, at first, may fail
later on, as newer files (needed to boot the system) get written further
into the drive. Such as when you install new kernels.

So, it (no boot partition) could well be a cause of a failure to boot,
though I'm not sure what sort of error message you'll see when that is
the problem. I'd expect some sort of file not found error, though.

I like partitioning the installation, so that should a drive error
happen, or the system does a check when it thinks there may be one, it's
a lot quicker to check a small partition than one huge one. Not to
mention that a file screw-up in a non-home partition is far less likely
to screw up personal files. And having a separate home partition makes
updating a lot easier: You can update a system, and keep personal files
in place. My current preference for a minimally partitioned system is
boot, /, and home. If I were doing more partitions, or spreading across
drive, I like separate var and tmp.

Other people see other advantages to partitioning: Such as different
file systems, or mounting options, for different partitions, more
optimum to that part of the system.

I have, in the past, moved partitions like you've done. Copied the
files to the new location, unmounted the old partition. Generally it
worked without any dramas, other than remembering to set permissions
correctly on the tmp directory. Sometimes a relabelling may be needed,
depending on how you copied/moved things over. But you'd need to be
able to boot up, first, for that. Again, you'd get a different kind of
error message than you mentioned.

Moving boot requires more than just copying files, and changing
pointers. There are bootloaders in the partitions.

How did you do the copying? With a file manager, the command line, done
as the root user?

Am I to assume that the installer WON'T do that for you? I've noticed
there's a 524MB "partition" on my 160GB hard drive, that just says
"Filesystem Partition 2 Ext4"......might this be where my root, home and
bootloading files are? I certainly don't remember creating this
partition...so where'd it come from? Just curious....as I do a backup of
everything on this drive to prevent something like this from happening
to me!....



EGO II
--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
Have a question? Ask away: http://ask.fedoraproject.org
 
Old 10-07-2012, 09:35 PM
Daniel Landau
 
Default Fedora fails to boot with systemd-journald failing

On 8 Oct 2012 00:07, "Tim" <ignored_mailbox@yahoo.com.au> wrote:

>

> Tim:

> >> Not really a good idea, but most particularly not keeping boot

> >> separate. *Nothing wrong with the other stuff being on one partition,

> >> you just need to make the change carefully.

>

> Daniel Landau:

> > There's no reason why you couldn't keep everything on one partition.

> > One possible reason could be having an ext2 boot partition and

> > something more exciting for the rest, but I don't think my problem is

> > with booting off ext4.

>

> Everything but boot can easily be in one partition, but there's one very

> good reason that boot *may* *need* to be in its own partition at the

> start of the drive: *Some BIOSes just can't read far enough into a drive

> to start booting up. *And what may seem to work, at first, may fail

> later on, as newer files (needed to boot the system) get written further

> into the drive. *Such as when you install new kernels.

>

> So, it (no boot partition) could well be a cause of a failure to boot,

> though I'm not sure what sort of error message you'll see when that is

> the problem. *I'd expect some sort of file not found error, though.

>

> I like partitioning the installation, so that should a drive error

> happen, or the system does a check when it thinks there may be one, it's

> a lot quicker to check a small partition than one huge one. *Not to

> mention that a file screw-up in a non-home partition is far less likely

> to screw up personal files. *And having a separate home partition makes

> updating a lot easier: *You can update a system, and keep personal files

> in place. *My current preference for a minimally partitioned system is

> boot, /, and home. *If I were doing more partitions, or spreading across

> drive, I like separate var and tmp.

>

> Other people see other advantages to partitioning: *Such as different

> file systems, or mounting options, for different partitions, more

> optimum to that part of the system.

>

Thank you for your thought out answer. I did know about some of the issues, but learned also new stuff, e.g. the bios thing was new to me.

> I have, in the past, moved partitions like you've done. *Copied the

> files to the new location, unmounted the old partition. *Generally it

> worked without any dramas, other than remembering to set permissions

> correctly on the tmp directory. *Sometimes a relabelling may be needed,

> depending on how you copied/moved things over. *But you'd need to be

> able to boot up, first, for that. *Again, you'd get a different kind of

> error message than you mentioned.

>

> Moving boot requires more than just copying files, and changing

> pointers. *There are bootloaders in the partitions.

>

I did update the grub config and reinstall it to the MBR.

> How did you do the copying? *With a file manager, the command line, done

> as the root user?


I did a "cp -a" as the root of a Fedora live USB boot.

Daniel Landau

--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
Have a question? Ask away: http://ask.fedoraproject.org
 
Old 10-07-2012, 11:08 PM
Joe Zeff
 
Default Fedora fails to boot with systemd-journald failing

On 10/07/2012 02:07 PM, Tim wrote:

Other people see other advantages to partitioning: Such as different
file systems, or mounting options, for different partitions, more
optimum to that part of the system.


One advantage of a separate /home is the ability to re-install without
losing any of your personal files. Not that I'd ever do that, mind you,
without backing it up first, of course.

--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
Have a question? Ask away: http://ask.fedoraproject.org
 
Old 10-08-2012, 08:31 AM
Frank Murphy
 
Default Fedora fails to boot with systemd-journald failing

On 07/10/12 18:20, Daniel Landau wrote:


Explain what is the name of the One?


Not really sure what you mean by this. It's name is /dev/sda5 perhaps?


sudo blkid will give you uuids to match your partition(s).



Yes, reinstall


That's not really helpful.


It is actually.
Then when ready to do the move.
Ask how it can be done safely.



And that's where I'm now. Some help would be appreciated.



Ask before you commit.
A lesson hard learned.


--
Regards,
Frank
"Jack of all, fubars"
--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
Have a question? Ask away: http://ask.fedoraproject.org
 
Old 10-08-2012, 10:48 AM
Tim
 
Default Fedora fails to boot with systemd-journald failing

On Sun, 2012-10-07 at 16:08 -0700, Joe Zeff wrote:
> One advantage of a separate /home is the ability to re-install without
> losing any of your personal files.

As I'd mentioned, though I did call it updating, it's down to the same
process - running the installer.

> Not that I'd ever do that, mind you, without backing it up first, of
> course.

Likewise, but you only have to do the backup, not a backup and a
reinstall. So you save half the time.

--
[tim@localhost ~]$ uname -r
2.6.27.25-78.2.56.fc9.i686

Don't send private replies to my address, the mailbox is ignored. I
read messages from the public lists.



--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
Have a question? Ask away: http://ask.fedoraproject.org
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 03:00 PM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org