FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > Redhat > Fedora User

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 09-29-2012, 11:28 PM
jackson byers
 
Default att-uverse new, can't access internet

f16
today we switched our tv,internet,phone to att-uverse.
Installation seemed to go smoothly.
Initial cks of internet access worked,
on both my f16 box and my wife's imac.

But that was with browsers already up from previous to changeover.

Now f16 has no internet.

Imac does have internet, after following
att rep on phone,
to somehow ( I am forgetting the steps, probably)
--click on something like wlesspanel ?
--click on 2wire397

--enter a 10digit key found on back of new modem

The att phone rep tried to be helpful on my f16, but I couldn't get anywhere.
fwiw, I am running xfce.


I have no clue,
help please

Jack

sent from the imac
--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
Have a question? Ask away: http://ask.fedoraproject.org
 
Old 09-29-2012, 11:45 PM
Frank Cox
 
Default att-uverse new, can't access internet

On Sat, 29 Sep 2012 16:28:53 -0700
jackson byers wrote:

> Now f16 has no internet.

Are you sure that you have no Internet and not just a non-existent or stale DNS
server?

Contents of /etc/resolv.conf?

Result of "ping 8.8.8.8"?



--
MELVILLE THEATRE ~ Real D 3D Digital Cinema ~ www.melvilletheatre.com
www.creekfm.com - FIFTY THOUSAND WATTS of POW WOW POWER!
--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
Have a question? Ask away: http://ask.fedoraproject.org
 
Old 09-29-2012, 11:50 PM
JD
 
Default att-uverse new, can't access internet

On 09/29/2012 05:45 PM, Frank Cox wrote:

On Sat, 29 Sep 2012 16:28:53 -0700
jackson byers wrote:


Now f16 has no internet.

Are you sure that you have no Internet and not just a non-existent or stale DNS
server?

Contents of /etc/resolv.conf?

Result of "ping 8.8.8.8"?




Add to that
ifconfig em1
and/or
ifconfig wlan0 or wlan1 whichever it is you are running,
and finally if you are on wireless, output of

iwconfig wlanX where X is the number of the interface.

--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
Have a question? Ask away: http://ask.fedoraproject.org
 
Old 10-01-2012, 11:01 PM
jackson byers
 
Default att-uverse new, can't access internet

what do you mean by stale DNS? how to tell

ping 8.8.8.8 fails...
56(84) bytes of data
from 192.168.2.8.....destination host unreachable

resolv.conf looks normal to me, been using it for a long time

generated by network manager
search pacbell.net
nameserver 206.13.31.12
nameserver 68.94.156.1


I don't have em1

not using wless on f16box

ifconfig eth0

eth0 linkcap erhernet ,, HWaddr: ....
inet addr… 192.168.2.8 bcast 192.168.2.255 mask 255.255.255.0
UP..
errors 0
interrupts 20
--------
the only new info:
the imac now is running internet access ethernet , prev was on airport wless'
so, as of now, the imac seems to have survived the switch to att-uverse
which suggests f16 should be able to do also
but I have no clue


f16box still no internet

att today gave a runaround:
one tech said their normal support cant help at all w linux,
but for a one time charge $49, they could get me to
a support specialist,
after much crap on telephone finally get to this specialist,
he said they can't deal with linux either.
He 'thinks' we can get our $49 back.


please excuse sloppy format,
very painful transcribing f16 responses to paper,
then going back to wife's office, manually typing in

Jack
--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
Have a question? Ask away: http://ask.fedoraproject.org
 
Old 10-02-2012, 01:09 AM
Tim
 
Default att-uverse new, can't access internet

On Mon, 2012-10-01 at 16:01 -0700, jackson byers wrote:
> what do you mean by stale DNS? how to tell

e.g. Using DNS servers you were told to (or the equipment was
automatically configured to use), which are no longer valid. For
instance, years ago, my ISP changed their DNS server addresses, and
anybody who used the old ones wouldn't have had a working network.

Sometime you have ISPs which tell you to use certain DNS server
addresses on their website help pages, but their system automatically
tells your computer to use some other addresses as it connects up.
You're left wondering which ones you should use, and sometimes it is not
the ones that they've left their system to automatically tell your
system about.

And, in some cases, perhaps many cases, some ISPs just have dreadful DNS
servers, and you're better off using something else. Mine have been in
the past, so I run my own DNS servers. Some people use one of Google's
DNS servers at 8.8.8.8.

NB: Be aware that you may need to use your own ISPs DNS servers if you
have a non-public IP address, and some of their servers that you need to
use have a non-public IP address, too (such as if you had to do email
through their mail servers).

> ping 8.8.8.8 fails...
> 56(84) bytes of data
> from 192.168.2.8.....destination host unreachable

Ping only tests that something responds to pings, and it doesn't have
to. If you want to test whether you can get DNS records from 8.8.8.8 as
a DNS server, then do a DNS request of it. You can change your
resolv.conf, or just use a tool that lets you ask specific servers on
demand.

e.g. dig example.com @8.8.8.8

> resolv.conf looks normal to me, been using it for a long time
>
> generated by network manager
> search pacbell.net
> nameserver 206.13.31.12
> nameserver 68.94.156.1

And you could test them in the same way.
dig example.com @206.13.31.12
dig example.com @68.94.156.1

Both of them gave prompt answers, to me, and I'm not even on their
network.

> the only new info:
> the imac now is running internet access ethernet , prev was on airport wless'
> so, as of now, the imac seems to have survived the switch to att-uverse
> which suggests f16 should be able to do also
> but I have no clue

If you're running different computers and/or OSs on a network that
directly connects you to them, then there may need to be a reset time
between changes. If you have a router between you and them, then that
shouldn't be a problem. The router would be what they see, all the
time, and what you connect behind it isn't any of their affair.

> att today gave a runaround:
> one tech said their normal support cant help at all w linux,

Sometimes it's best to lie to tech support. Say you are using Windows
when you're not, that you just need the information to manually
configure it. But, again, if you connect to your ISP through a
modem/router, rather than plug a computer direct into their equipment,
it should be support for configuring the router, rather than a computer.

Looking back at your original posting:
> Imac does have internet, after following
> att rep on phone,
> to somehow ( I am forgetting the steps, probably)
> --click on something like wlesspanel ?
> --click on 2wire397
>
> --enter a 10digit key found on back of new modem

If that 10 digit key is something looking like this,
"00:1A:928:F2:79" (actually more than 10 digits), that's the MAC of
the ethernet port, and they're asking you to set your current ethernet
port to have the same MAC address of another device's. That isn't going
to work if you try to put several devices on the same network with the
same MAC.

You should probably describe your network in greater detail,
particularly what's between your ISP and your computers (modem/router,
ethernet hole in the wall...).

Some ISPs supply you with one public IP, and you'd need a router doing
NAT between you and them to share the IP between multiple devices. Some
ISPs give you multiple public IPs, and you can simply have a switch/hub
between you and them.

The more info, the less guessing games by us, and less advice that's
going to lead you down the wrong path.

--
[tim@localhost ~]$ uname -r
2.6.27.25-78.2.56.fc9.i686

Don't send private replies to my address, the mailbox is ignored. I
read messages from the public lists.



--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
Have a question? Ask away: http://ask.fedoraproject.org
 
Old 10-02-2012, 01:32 AM
Joe Zeff
 
Default att-uverse new, can't access internet

On 10/01/2012 06:09 PM, Tim wrote:

Sometimes it's best to lie to tech support. Say you are using Windows
when you're not, that you just need the information to manually
configure it.


I do even better. I start off by telling the droid on the other side of
the phone or chat client that I was "on their side of the phone for
almost ten years." (True) If they treat me the way they'd like to be
treated during a call, this will be the easiest call they'll have all
day; if they try to baby-step me or assume that I don't know what I'm
doing, I'll be their worst nightmare. Then I'll tell them that I'm
running Linux, not Windows, and that all I need from them is specific
information. If they'll tell me what info they need, I'll know where to
find it and tell them what I see. (Sometimes the only way to get a chat
session started is to pretend I'm using Windows, but I'm careful to
correct that as quickly as possible.)


More often than you'd expect, things go smoothly after that. Once in a
while, I run across somebody who either can't or won't do anything
except parrot Windows-specific cheat-sheets even when they're
irrelevant, and I end up discussing my issue with their supervisor.

--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
Have a question? Ask away: http://ask.fedoraproject.org
 
Old 10-02-2012, 08:01 PM
jackson byers
 
Default att-uverse new, can't access internet

Tim,
thanks much for your reply.
I am still much in the dark re DNS servers
More on that below

>If you're running different computers and/or OSs on a network that
>between changes. If you have a router between you and them, then that
>shouldn't be a problem. The router would be what they see, all the
>time, and what you connect behind it isn't any of their affair.
....
I think there is a router, inside the uverse-modem.

>> --enter a 10digit key found on back of new modem

>If that 10 digit key is something looking like this,
>"00:1A:928:F2:79"

NO, it is just a set of numbers w some spaces, no ":"
I don't think this early thing re wless att had me do on the imac
is playing any role any more.
As I said later the imac is now running w wired internet access,
"Airport" wless no longer being used,
seems to have no DNS problems.

>You should probably describe your network in greater detail,
>particularly what's between your ISP and your computers (modem/router,
>ethernet hole in the wall...).

>Some ISPs supply you with one public IP, and you'd need a router doing
>NAT between you and them to share the IP between multiple devices. Some
>ISPs give you multiple public IPs, and you can simply have a switch/hub
>between you and them.

>The more info, the less guessing games by us, and less advice that's
>going to lead you down the wrong path.
--

Amen.
What I had just before the attuverse:
an old pacbell adsl modem
a linksys router, plugged into that adslmodem.
my f16box i think connected into that router.
from another room,
the imac ethernet connected i think into that router.

2 more things connected but not used for several yrs:
a laptop, also i think plugged into that router.
some type of wless access point plugged into that router.

What we have now since the att uverse install
--above adslmodem, router,laptop, access point disconnected.
--new uverse modem, tech said it had a router in it,
with its own fwall.
I can't see any off/on switch on that uverse modem.
Would it be worth trying to unplug, and plug back in the black power cable?

There is also a uverse WAP, used only to get the uverse tv signals
to our two tvs. As far as I know this has nothing to do with our computers.

f16box, imac both ethernet connected to that uverse modem.

3 new pieces of some type of electronic gear now under my desk
also connected to the uverse modem.
The uverse install tech did not explain their use to me,
or even point them out to me.
Evidently necessary electronics parts needed for the uverse setup.
I only noticed them after the tech left.

The imac has been working with the new uverse, with
working internet wired connection, no DNS problems.
imac no longer using the Airport wless
which we used only for 1-2 days.

--------------
DNS
bash-3.2$ dig pacbell.net @64.94.156.1

; <<>> DiG 9.6-ESV-R4-P3 <<>> pacbell.net @64.94.156.1
;; global options: +cmd
;; connection timed out; no servers could be reached
bash-3.2$



bash-3.2$ dig pacbell.net @206.13.31.12

; <<>> DiG 9.6-ESV-R4-P3 <<>> pacbell.net @206.13.31.12
;; global options: +cmd
;; Got answer:
;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 36167
;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 1, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 0

;; QUESTION SECTION:
;pacbell.net. IN A

;; ANSWER SECTION:
pacbell.net. 7200 IN A 151.164.129.3

;; Query time: 31 msec
;; SERVER: 206.13.31.12#53(206.13.31.12)
;; WHEN: Tue Oct 2 12:29:17 2012
;; MSG SIZE rcvd: 45

bash-3.2$


bash-3.2$ dig pacbell.net @8.8.8.8

; <<>> DiG 9.6-ESV-R4-P3 <<>> pacbell.net @8.8.8.8
;; global options: +cmd
;; Got answer:
;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 2154
;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 1, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 0

;; QUESTION SECTION:
;pacbell.net. IN A

;; ANSWER SECTION:
pacbell.net. 5561 IN A 151.164.129.3

;; Query time: 47 msec
;; SERVER: 8.8.8.8#53(8.8.8.8)
;; WHEN: Tue Oct 2 12:33:41 2012
;; MSG SIZE rcvd: 45

bash-3.2$



what does this tell me?
that 64.94.156.1 is no good, or stale, or???

that 206.13.31.12 is good? valid nameserver?

that 151.164.129.3 is good? valid nameserver?

if 206.13.31.12 is a good namesever, since it is already in my f16
/etc/resolv.conf
shouldn't I have internet access?

do I have to do something like restart NetworkManager?
NM has always just been a silent thing, not to be messed with.
If it is worth trying how would I do this?
I am not at all up on systemd.
I haven't had cause to use chkconfig for years, no need.

Again, thanks for help

Jack
--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
Have a question? Ask away: http://ask.fedoraproject.org
 
Old 10-03-2012, 02:19 PM
Tim
 
Default att-uverse new, can't access internet

jackson byers:
> I think there is a router, inside the uverse-modem.

If you said exactly what model it is, someone may be able to tell you,
or we could look for manuals and find out. Generally speaking, if the
modem has two or more outputs to the computer (ethernet and/or USB),
it's a combination modem/router unit.

>>> --enter a 10digit key found on back of new modem

>> If that 10 digit key is something looking like this,
>> "00:1A:928:F2:79"

> NO, it is just a set of numbers w some spaces, no ":"
> I don't think this early thing re wless att had me do on the imac
> is playing any role any more.
> As I said later the imac is now running w wired internet access,
> "Airport" wless no longer being used,
> seems to have no DNS problems.

It'd be easier to follow this if you didn't abbreviate words so much
that I have to guess at what you're referring to.

My next guess is that the 10 digit key is a pass key for authenticating
over an encrypted network, as many wireless links are, and should be.
Unencrypted wireless, or inadequately encrypted, is a major security
problem.

Perhaps that device comes with a preconfigured access key, rather than
requiring you to enter your own personal keys into both sides of the
connection (router, and client computers).


> What I had just before the attuverse:
> an old pacbell adsl modem
> a linksys router, plugged into that adslmodem.
> my f16box i think connected into that router.
> from another room,
> the imac ethernet connected i think into that router.
>
> 2 more things connected but not used for several yrs:
> a laptop, also i think plugged into that router.
> some type of wless access point plugged into that router.
>
> What we have now since the att uverse install
> --above adslmodem, router,laptop, access point disconnected.
> --new uverse modem, tech said it had a router in it,
> with its own fwall.
> I can't see any off/on switch on that uverse modem.
> Would it be worth trying to unplug, and plug back in the black power cable?

You may as well try. Unplug and give it a good 15 seconds to completely
power down. Equipment does occasionally glitch, and then behave oddly,
that requires a hard reset, to recover.

> There is also a uverse WAP, used only to get the uverse tv signals
> to our two tvs. As far as I know this has nothing to do with our computers.

Wireless access points may act as a router, they could act as just a
simple network switch. A switch just lets everything communicate
together, a router imposes rules about what can and cannot connect, and
can change the way traffic flows through it (redirection).

Connecting any sort of router (wireless or wired) to another device
requires it to be done properly. Particularly if it has a DHCP server,
you can end up having two or more competing DHCP servers on a network.
Also, routers need to be connected the right way around (i.e. all your
client devices on the output side).

> f16box, imac both ethernet connected to that uverse modem.
>
> 3 new pieces of some type of electronic gear now under my desk
> also connected to the uverse modem.
> The uverse install tech did not explain their use to me,
> or even point them out to me.
> Evidently necessary electronics parts needed for the uverse setup.
> I only noticed them after the tech left.

Hmm, well, if you can't tell us what they are, we can't offer any advice
about them. Whether they have anything to do with the issues, or not.

Are they power supplies for the rest of the devices, DSL/phone line
separation filters, soemthing else?

> The imac has been working with the new uverse, with
> working internet wired connection, no DNS problems.
> imac no longer using the Airport wless
> which we used only for 1-2 days.
>
> --------------
> DNS
> bash-3.2$ dig pacbell.net @64.94.156.1
>
> ; <<>> DiG 9.6-ESV-R4-P3 <<>> pacbell.net @64.94.156.1
> ;; global options: +cmd
> ;; connection timed out; no servers could be reached
> bash-3.2$

Which could mean that, *that* 64.94.156.1 address is wrong, or access to
it is being denied to your IP. It doesn't work for me, either. Yet,
both the DNS addresses worked for me in your prior message. So, I'd
remove that address from your resolv.conf file. Your prior message
listed 68.94.156.1, and that worked.

If the first DNS server in your resolv.conf file doesn't work, it's
going to mess up networking, because your system will always try to use
the first listed DNS server, first, and only move onto using the second
server after waiting for the first one to respond for quite some time.

> bash-3.2$ dig pacbell.net @206.13.31.12
>
> ;; ANSWER SECTION:
> pacbell.net. 7200 IN A 151.164.129.3
>
> ;; Query time: 31 msec

Reducing that down to the crucial parts of that test, shows that you got
an answer (the IP for pacbell.net is 151.164.129.3) and that it was very
quick (a small fraction of a second).

Just for further information, if you ever need to, you can do lookups in
the other direction, to find out the domain name associated with an IP
by using the -x option. e.g. dig -x 192.0.43.10


> bash-3.2$ dig pacbell.net @8.8.8.8
>
> ;; ANSWER SECTION:
> pacbell.net. 5561 IN A 151.164.129.3
>
> ;; Query time: 47 msec

That one took a bit longer, because it had to connect to a DNS server
further away from you, though not a significantly longer time for most
things. Slightly longer response times only become a problem when you
have to keep on looking up lots of addresses, and each lookup makes you
wait.


> what does this tell me?
> that 64.94.156.1 is no good, or stale, or???

Is probably wrong.

"Stale" DNS is a term that generally means some DNS server is giving you
old data. i.e. If you asked it what was the IP for Google, and it
returned you the IP address that Google used last week, instead of what
it currently uses.

Some people use the term in another way. Such as your ISP telling your
computer to use some particular IP as a DNS server, when *that* address
is old, and they should be telling a different address, since the DNS
server has changed location.

For what it's worth, sometimes you can find out the name servers for
your ISP, by yourself. It's common for name servers to have a "ns"
hostname in front of their domain name. So, if I wanted to find out the
nameservers for a ficticious example.com ISP, I could try doing a query
like: dig ns.example.com Likewise, I could try ns1.example.com or
ns2.example.com, to see if they have other name servers, too.

> that 206.13.31.12 is good? valid nameserver?

Yes, that it responded quickly to you querying it.

> that 151.164.129.3 is good? valid nameserver?

That wasn't a name server, that was the answer to a query you made of a
DNS server. You asked 206.13.31.12 to tell you the IP for pacbell.net,
and it told you that pacbell.net is it 151.164.129.3.

> if 206.13.31.12 is a good namesever, since it is already in my f16
> /etc/resolv.conf
> shouldn't I have internet access?

Well, yes, in that you can query it for domain names. But, like I said
earlier on, if you have a wrong name server address in your resolv.conf
file listed before it, you will have problems.

> do I have to do something like restart NetworkManager?

If you have wrong data in resolv.conf file, restarting NetworkManager
may cause your system to set up the network connection again, and find
out which DNS servers to use. It'll probably rewrite the resolv.conf
file, and you can look for any changes to it.

If you're having to manually correct faults in it, then you may want to
look at ways to override NetworkManager. That, or bring the faults to
the attention of your ISP, so they can stop giving out the wrong
information.

Considering what you've told me about your network, I'd suggest that
your modem/router is being told to use those IPs for DNS servers as it
connected. Then, when your computer connects to your modem/router, it's
passing along the same addresses for your computer to use.

On that note, to eliminate one source of a non-working network, turn on
your modem/router before your computers, and let it completely finish
connecting (watch the blinking lights), before booting up your
computers.

If you can get the modem/router working fine, by itself, and working
well with at least one computer connected, but not with all devices on
your LAN working at the same time, that might point to there being an
artificial restriction on the number of devices that can be connected,
or a fault with one of them. Unplug things one-by-one, and try to
narrow it down.

Here, I find that network switches tend to die off every couple of
years, between two buildings. I suspect there's a potential difference
between the buildings, and the switches aren't galvanically isolated.
Or that EMI from thunderstorms overloads their input circuitry. In this
case, they didn't just die, but flapped about, serious disrupting the
rest of the network. Looking at their blinking lights, you'd think that
they were working normally, but they were faulty.

--
[tim@localhost ~]$ uname -r
2.6.27.25-78.2.56.fc9.i686

Don't send private replies to my address, the mailbox is ignored. I
read messages from the public lists.



--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
Have a question? Ask away: http://ask.fedoraproject.org
 
Old 10-03-2012, 05:11 PM
jackson byers
 
Default att-uverse new, can't access internet

>It'd be easier to follow this if you didn't abbreviate words so much
>that I have to guess at what you're referring to.
Will try not to use abbreviations at all.

>My next guess is that the 10 digit key is a pass key for authenticating
>over an encrypted network, as many wireless links are, and should be.
>Unencrypted wireless, or inadequately encrypted, is a major security
>problem.

>Perhaps that device comes with a preconfigured access key, rather than
>requiring you to enter your own personal keys into both sides of the
>connection (router, and client computers).

I don't really understand your response here.
To repeat, the imac is working, apparently with full internet access,
via *wired* connection. The prior use of wireless internet on the imac,
has been turned off.

>> Evidently necessary electronics parts needed for the uverse setup.
>> I only noticed them after the tech left.

>Hmm, well, if you can't tell us what they are, we can't offer any advice
>about them. Whether they have anything to do with the issues, or not.

>Are they power supplies for the rest of the devices, DSL/phone line
>separation filters, soemthing else?

will try to get sensible answers from att, will reply on that later.


>> that 64.94.156.1 is no good, or stale, or???

>Is probably wrong.

YES, sorry, 'just' a typo on my part,
it has always been 68.94.156.1
which seems to say both of the DNS numbers I am using are valid.


>For what it's worth, sometimes you can find out the name servers for
>your ISP, by yourself. It's common for name servers to have a "ns"
>hostname in front of their domain name. So, if I wanted to find out the
>nameservers for a ficticious example.com ISP, I could try doing a query
>like: dig ns.example.com Likewise, I could try ns1.example.com or
>ns2.example.com, to see if they have other name servers, too.

> But, like I said
>earlier on, if you have a wrong name server address in your resolv.conf
>file listed before it, you will have problems.

>If you have wrong data in resolv.conf file, restarting NetworkManager
>may cause your system to set up the network connection again, and find
>out which DNS servers to use. It'll probably rewrite the resolv.conf
>file, and you can look for any changes to it.

This now appears not so, i.e. the data in resolv.conf appear correct.

bash-3.2$ dig ns1.pacbell.net

; <<>> DiG 9.6-ESV-R4-P3 <<>> ns1.pacbell.net
;; global options: +cmd
;; Got answer:
;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NXDOMAIN, id: 2897
;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 0, AUTHORITY: 1, ADDITIONAL: 0

;; QUESTION SECTION:
;ns1.pacbell.net. IN A

;; AUTHORITY SECTION:
pacbell.net. 7200 IN SOA ns1.pbi.net. postmaster.pbi.ne
t. 2012100300 3600 900 604800 7200

;; Query time: 1071 msec
;; SERVER: 192.168.1.254#53(192.168.1.254)
;; WHEN: Wed Oct 3 09:26:10 2012
;; MSG SIZE rcvd: 88

Does this tell me anything? is ns1.pbi.net a DNS number I could/should use?
In addition to the two I now have?



I did pull the new modem power cable,
after plugging back in the system took a while to come fully on.
No help on internet:
trying to start google chrome, still getting message invalid DNS.


It seems I don't need to correct faults in the DNS numbers,
so does it still make sense to restart NetworkManager?
Exactly how would I restart it?
-- chkconfig?
-- some systemd command?

I did pull the new modem power cable,
after plugging back in the system took a while to come fully on.
No help on internet:
trying to start google chrome, still getting message invalid DNS.

thanks much for your continuing responses.
Jack
--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
Have a question? Ask away: http://ask.fedoraproject.org
 
Old 10-03-2012, 05:20 PM
Terry Polzin
 
Default att-uverse new, can't access internet

On Wed, 2012-10-03 at 10:11 -0700, jackson byers wrote:
> >It'd be easier to follow this if you didn't abbreviate words so much
> >that I have to guess at what you're referring to.
> Will try not to use abbreviations at all.
>
> >My next guess is that the 10 digit key is a pass key for authenticating
> >over an encrypted network, as many wireless links are, and should be.
> >Unencrypted wireless, or inadequately encrypted, is a major security
> >problem.
>
> >Perhaps that device comes with a preconfigured access key, rather than
> >requiring you to enter your own personal keys into both sides of the
> >connection (router, and client computers).
>
> I don't really understand your response here.
> To repeat, the imac is working, apparently with full internet access,
> via *wired* connection. The prior use of wireless internet on the imac,
> has been turned off.
>
> >> Evidently necessary electronics parts needed for the uverse setup.
> >> I only noticed them after the tech left.
>
> >Hmm, well, if you can't tell us what they are, we can't offer any advice
> >about them. Whether they have anything to do with the issues, or not.
>
> >Are they power supplies for the rest of the devices, DSL/phone line
> >separation filters, soemthing else?
>
> will try to get sensible answers from att, will reply on that later.
>
>
> >> that 64.94.156.1 is no good, or stale, or???
>
> >Is probably wrong.
>
> YES, sorry, 'just' a typo on my part,
> it has always been 68.94.156.1
> which seems to say both of the DNS numbers I am using are valid.
>
>
> >For what it's worth, sometimes you can find out the name servers for
> >your ISP, by yourself. It's common for name servers to have a "ns"
> >hostname in front of their domain name. So, if I wanted to find out the
> >nameservers for a ficticious example.com ISP, I could try doing a query
> >like: dig ns.example.com Likewise, I could try ns1.example.com or
> >ns2.example.com, to see if they have other name servers, too.
>
> > But, like I said
> >earlier on, if you have a wrong name server address in your resolv.conf
> >file listed before it, you will have problems.
>
> >If you have wrong data in resolv.conf file, restarting NetworkManager
> >may cause your system to set up the network connection again, and find
> >out which DNS servers to use. It'll probably rewrite the resolv.conf
> >file, and you can look for any changes to it.
>
> This now appears not so, i.e. the data in resolv.conf appear correct.
>
> bash-3.2$ dig ns1.pacbell.net
>
> ; <<>> DiG 9.6-ESV-R4-P3 <<>> ns1.pacbell.net
> ;; global options: +cmd
> ;; Got answer:
> ;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NXDOMAIN, id: 2897
> ;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 0, AUTHORITY: 1, ADDITIONAL: 0
>
> ;; QUESTION SECTION:
> ;ns1.pacbell.net. IN A
>
> ;; AUTHORITY SECTION:
> pacbell.net. 7200 IN SOA ns1.pbi.net. postmaster.pbi.ne
> t. 2012100300 3600 900 604800 7200
>
> ;; Query time: 1071 msec
> ;; SERVER: 192.168.1.254#53(192.168.1.254)
> ;; WHEN: Wed Oct 3 09:26:10 2012
> ;; MSG SIZE rcvd: 88
>
> Does this tell me anything? is ns1.pbi.net a DNS number I could/should use?
> In addition to the two I now have?
>
>
>
> I did pull the new modem power cable,
> after plugging back in the system took a while to come fully on.
> No help on internet:
> trying to start google chrome, still getting message invalid DNS.
>
>
> It seems I don't need to correct faults in the DNS numbers,
> so does it still make sense to restart NetworkManager?
> Exactly how would I restart it?
> -- chkconfig?
> -- some systemd command?
>
> I did pull the new modem power cable,
> after plugging back in the system took a while to come fully on.
> No help on internet:
> trying to start google chrome, still getting message invalid DNS.
>
> thanks much for your continuing responses.
> Jack

A simple disconnect and reconnect of your wired connection should renew
it's IP address and /etc/resolv.conf else why not just reboot.

--
users mailing list
users@lists.fedoraproject.org
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
https://admin.fedoraproject.org/mailman/listinfo/users
Guidelines: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Mailing_list_guidelines
Have a question? Ask away: http://ask.fedoraproject.org
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 02:35 AM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright ©2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org