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"bruce" 04-02-2008 06:02 PM

Linux is KING - Couldn't be hacked - Mac, Vista went down inflames
 
i recall my 1st use of a time share on the local university's machine..

my 7th grade math teach was taking colleges courses, in like 1972.. and she
had access to a tele-type machine with the dialup phone couple hooked to the
machine...

the machine created rollup punched out paper spools that we had written our
"basic" programs on....

i thought punch cards were a step up when i got into college later on!

i say all this as i cruise on a 4G-Mem/250G-Drive/17" laptop on a fast
wireless network!


my god i'm old!!!



-----Original Message-----
From: fedora-list-bounces@redhat.com
[mailto:fedora-list-bounces@redhat.com]On Behalf Of Les
Sent: Wednesday, April 02, 2008 8:10 AM
To: For users of Fedora
Subject: Re: Linux is KING - Couldn't be hacked - Mac, Vista went down
inflames


On Tue, 2008-04-01 at 20:36 -0700, Richard England wrote:
> BRUCE STANLEY wrote:
> >
> >
> > */Tim <ignored_mailbox@yahoo.com.au>/* wrote:
> >
> > Tim:
> > >> have the CPU op-code cheat sheet in the coat pocket... ;-)
> >
> > Les:
> > > I memorized it and threw it away. Does that mean I fail the test?
> >
> > If you code in pen and ink before even going near the computer, that
> > counts.
> >
> > Back when I were a lad, we didn't use no debugger. We'd print the
> > code,
> > and attack the printout with pencils out to mark all the bugs and
> > corrections, then type the changes back in.
> >
> > Tim, waiting for one of the old codgers to tell us a tale of how
they
> > had to make the valves and warm them up before starting... ;-)
> >
> > =========
> >
> > Type them in? I remember punching them in on Hollerith cards.
> >
> > Dropped a pile of them once.
> >
> > That motivated me to have the punch card machine to put sequence numbers
> > on the cards so that they could be resorted again.
> > punch card machine
> Try dropping two trays , each about 2.5 feet long. They did that to me
> in the data center when I was in grad school. Luckily I had just
> printed they contents out and resequenced them. The manager of the data
> center had a cow when I told the staff to put the deck back together,
> but my advisor (bless him) stood behind me and insisted that if they had
> taken due care it wouldn't have happened.
>
> Ah cards, loved 'em (not). And drum cards. Boy there was an arcane art!
>
> ~~R
>
Did you have the diagonal line drawn on the top to help?

If they were Fortran, or COBOL, you could always sort on the line
number. I don't remember the other languages having line numbers.

Regards,
Les H

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"Mikkel L. Ellertson" 04-02-2008 06:04 PM

Linux is KING - Couldn't be hacked - Mac, Vista went down inflames
 
bruce wrote:

i recall my 1st use of a time share on the local university's machine..

my 7th grade math teach was taking colleges courses, in like 1972.. and she
had access to a tele-type machine with the dialup phone couple hooked to the
machine...

the machine created rollup punched out paper spools that we had written our
"basic" programs on....

i thought punch cards were a step up when i got into college later on!

i say all this as i cruise on a 4G-Mem/250G-Drive/17" laptop on a fast
wireless network!


my god i'm old!!!


Even better - it was a 110 baud connection. The teletype was
probably 72 characters wide, all capitals. The paper tape had up to
8 full size holes and one small alignment hole. You were probably
punching 7 bit ASCII code, possibly with parity. The aliment hole
was used by a toothed sprocket to move the tape on the teletype, but
could also be used as a clocking bit for optical readers.


There was also a 5 bit version that didn't use ASCII... Both types
also had a 20ma or 60ma current loop interface. Great for long
distance wired serial communications. The bast part is that were
almost entirely mechanical, with very little electronics.


The teletype was also popular with early home computers like the
Altar 8008, and other S-100 systems. CP/M had teletype support.


Now I feel old - I owned a model 33 teletype.

Mikkel
--

A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
Q: Why is top-posting a bad thing?


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